Jun 04, 2023  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Executive Business Administration

  
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    EMBA 615/5615 - Global Supply Chain Management and Operational Excellence (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module is about supply chain management from suppliers to customers to clients, how to link it with marketing and business strategy and develop Global Business Networks. It addresses operational excellence as a competitive strategy, customer service versus operational efficiency from “built-to-forecast” to “build-to-order” and behavioral operational management
     

  
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    EMBA 616/5616 - Negotiation & Conflict Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It focuses on negotiation as an important process in resolving conflicts that may arise from differences in interests such as goal, priorities or competition from limited resources. It examines stakes, power, interdependence, trust, coalitions, communication, and personal negotiation styles. Participants practice cross-cultural negotiations, dispute resolution, coalition formulation. It addresses multiparty negotiations, extremely competitive negotiations and negotiations via Information Technology (IT).
     

  
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    EMBA 617/5617 - Entrepreneurial Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It covers the challenges involved in managing entrepreneurial ventures, whether they are start-ups, small entrepreneurial firm or units within larger, well-established companies. It focuses on the behaviors and attributes required to operate successfully within entrepreneurial environment. The module addresses the concepts, theory of practice of entrepreneurship in a dynamic international environment. It helps participants to understand the risks and rewards that accompany entrepreneurial activities and develop the skills of leadership while enhancing their own practice.
     

  
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    EMBA 618/5618 - Doing Business With The East (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module is live-in week in Hong Kong. Participants will be prepared for new challenges and opportunities that they will face in the business world, especially in China and Asia. The modules include introduction to Asia/China Business, Economic, social and political environments. Emphasis will be on China’s current Economy Development, Change in Business environment and managing in a Chinese context.
     

  
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    EMBA 619/5619 - Doing Business With The East (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module will be a continuation of above topic. There will be an overview about the Legal and Regulatory issues, managing Joint-Venture Partnerships, Entry strategies, Marketing and Human Resources challenges in China. Practical cases on Legal and Regulatory issues and on Successful Negotiation in China will be studies. Participants will be able to visit companies during their study.
     

  
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    EMBA 620/5620 - Corporate Governance & Social Responsibility (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on how corporate governance, as a set of processes, customs, policies, laws and institutions, affects the way the organization is directed and controlled. It examines how the quality of corporate governance system influences prices shares of the company and the cost of raising capital and how it complies with the legal and regulatory requirements. It addresses some important topics as the separation of ownership and control, property rights, reconciling conflicts between stakeholders and the role of the board of directors in ensuring accountability, fairness and transparency in the firm’s relationship with all its stakeholders.
     

  
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    EMBA 621/5621 - Business & Legal Environment (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module relates business to its legal environment. It provides broad analysis of how laws influence management decisions and strategies, how to review the characteristics of various legal structures and how to set the legal framework for doing business. It focuses on how business decisions and transactions should comply with the law. It familiarizes participants with certain basic legal concepts relating to doing business on national and international levels.
     

  
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    EMBA 622/5622 - Development & Rationale for Competitive Law (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module looks at how competition law fits in a larger context of economic policy. It covers the development and rationale for international competition law for firms, with reference to developing countries’ competition law as well as relevant provisions in the Egyptian competition policy and covers agreements between firms (cartels, joint ventures, mergers), monopolization, and public enforcement of law by competition authorities, private enforcement in the courts and the coordination of private and public enforcement.
     

  
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    EMBA 623/5623 - Adapting to Global Environment - Integration Consultation Project (4 cr.)



    Description
    Participants undertake a successful “consulting” project within their own organization, identifying a challenge or an opportunity they seek to address and undertaking the appropriate analysis leading to a recommended course of action. Participants are encouraged to apply and integrate several analytical tools and organizational skills learned in various courses of the program. It provides concrete tools and concepts for projects management. The module is taught in an interactive case-based format. Participants are expected to actively participate while providing insights from their own experiences with project management. Participants will understand why many projects fail, know the critical success factors, be able to define and analyze work breakdown structures and critical paths for projects, and understand the impact of uncertainty on project management.
     

  
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    EMBA 000/5624 - Independent Study - Selected Topics in Management (1-3 cr.)



    Description
    This module has been designed for professionals who want to improve their management skills, either to improve their roles or to progress within their current company. It also offers students the opportunity to develop their critical thinking on different topics and how they relate them to organizational issues of opportunity, inclusion, creativity and innovation and organizational effectiveness, etc.

    This will be delivered through supervised guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topics in Executive Management studies.

  
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    EMBA 000/5625 - Doing Business in Africa (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This course equips students with an appreciation of the challenges and opportunities of doing business in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The course enables students to investigate the multiple prospects for doing business in SSA and deals with the contextual factors that impact the potential success of organizations in SSA. It covers methods to examine the risk of doing business in SSA, be that for a new venture, or geographical expansion of an existing enterprise. This includes sensitizing participants about the different drivers of the ease of doing business in SSA like different regulatory frameworks, exchange controls, immigration requirements and ways of structuring the engagements.

    Notes
    This course will be offered in cooperation with Stellenbosch University (USB).

Film

  
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    FILM 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    A course that addresses broad intellectual concerns and is accessible to students from any major or class level.  The course is offered as part of the Freshman Level of the Core Curriculum.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
  
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    FILM 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    FILM 220/2120 - Introduction to Film Art (3 cr.)



    Description
      An introduction to the art of cinema, covering basic film language, aesthetics, history and theory. Narrative feature (fiction), documentary (non-fiction), and avant-garde modes are analyzed in detail, and relevant films are screened in class to stimulate learning and discussion.

    When Offered
    Offered during Fall and Spring
    Notes
    Required for the Major and Minor in Film.
  
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    FILM 000/2121 - Introduction to Film Production (3 cr.)



    Description
    This introductory filmmaking course teaches Film students pre-production skills and techniques.
    The best directors, the most creative cinematographers and the most promising actors cannot produce a quality film without solid pre-production. On that account, participants in this course will be taken through the various stages of pre-production, from finding a strong story concept to writing a screenplay for production. Students will learn how to conduct research on their stories and how to build and create characters and write dialogues. They will be introduced to the craft of storytelling, story development and story structure in film. In addition, they will learn how to present their story concepts in the form of an exposé and a treatment. Assigned readings will complement practical knowledge and provide background to the craft of cinematic storytelling. The course will consist of lectures and exercises, take-home assignments, presentations and group critiques. An overview will be provided of all pre-production needs, from budgeting to crewing and scheduling. By the end of the course, students will write a screenplay and be able to pitch their story concepts for potential production during the following semester.

  
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    FILM 000/2122 - Introduction to Film Criticism (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2120  or consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is an extension of Introduction to Film Art (FILM 2120). Whereas the first course focuses on the basics of film language and textual analysis, Introduction to Film Criticism focuses on the major schools of film criticism and teaches students how to write about film using those critical methodologies. The course is required for Film majors, as it provides them with basic knowledge necessary for satisfactory performance in more advanced Film courses. The course is also open, with permission of the instructor, to non-Film majors/minors who are interested in a more comprehensive introduction to the field (e.g., students of media/journalism and comparative literature).

  
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    FILM 000/2123 - Introduction to Film Production II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2121  

    Description
    This course follows FILM 2121 - Introduction to Film Production. It will concentrate on the narrative form with the goal of writing, directing, performing, and producing original short films. It will survey the fundamental aesthetic and technical film elements and techniques including cinematography, directing, acting, sound recording, and editing. Students will have the opportunity to develop their screenplays written in FILM 2121. This course will consist of discussions, screenings, written and oral exercises, and group projects.

  
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    FILM 000/2201 - Acting I (3 cr.)



    Description
    A basic course in the fundamentals of acting, designed for majors, minors, and those with some previous experience. In-class exercises and improvisations, combined with rehearsed scenes and monologues from simple realistic texts, will help students gain proficiency in objective/obstacles, creation of character, basic voice and breath control, and basic body alignment and awareness.

    Cross-listed
    Same as THTR 2201  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring, and occasionally in the summer.
  
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    FILM 000/2211 - Acting in Arabic I (3 cr.)



    Description
    The art and craft of acting as a systematic process applied to the specific demands of Arabic Drama. Scene work and monologues from modern and contemporary Arabic plays.

    Cross-listed
    Same as THTR 2211 
    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring, and occasionally in the summer.
  
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    FILM 000/3030 - Literature and Cinema (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course investigates the relationship between literature and cinema and how they complement each other in representing textually and visually a broad theme, a historical period, or a national concern.

    Cross-listed
    ECLT 3030  
  
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    FILM 341/3041 - Anthropology and Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The history and practice of film in anthropology; film as ethnography; comparison of films and analytical ethnographies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    FILM 370/3070 - Selected Topics in Film (3 cr.)



    Description
    In-depth examination of specific topics in film determined by the special interests and expertise of the faculty..

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes
  
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    FILM 310/3110 - World Cinema (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of key international cinemas from the post-Second World War period to the present day, which have come to be understood retrospectively, during the contemporary period, as “world cinema.” Students will gain critical exposure to films and film movements such as Third World cinema, European New Waves and art films, the Japanese New Wave, Brazilian cinema novo, and the more recent North American “indie” cinema. In the process, students will learn how to locate and subject the socio-economic and ideologico-political conditions of world cinema to serious analysis and critique.

    When Offered
    Offered during Fall or Spring
  
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    FILM 000/3115 - American Cinema 1895-1945 (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a history of the most influential cinema in the world: Hollywood. American Cinema 1895-1945 concentrates on the first half of the twentieth century. Students will acquire broad knowledge of the early years of American cinema and of the classical Hollywood studio system, and will view films from the silent, black-and-white era as well as those made just after the introduction of sound and color. This course is designed for students from across the disciplines and carries no prerequisites.

  
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    FILM 000/3117 - American Cinema 1945-present (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a history of the most influential cinema in the world: Hollywood. American Cinema 1945-present concentrates on the second half of the twentieth century through the early twenty-first century. Students will acquire broad knowledge of the hey-day of Hollywood cinema and of the post-Hollywood era. This course is designed for students from across the disciplines and carries no prerequisites.

  
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    FILM 320/3120 - Cinema in Egypt and the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines various aspects of cinema in Egypt and the Arab World in order to understand its history, and determine the themes, the styles, and the character of this cinema which has been historically among the most influential in national world cinemas. Topics could include areas such as New Arab Cinemas, classical Egyptian cinema, the Arab film industry, independent Arab cinema, among others.

  
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    FILM 000/3125 - Topics in National Cinemas (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course variably focuses on a specific national and, where appropriate, regional cinema, such as that of Germany, France, Argentina, Brazil, Japan,Italy, England, Sub-Saharan Africa, India, China, Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Eastern Europe, Iran, Turkey, Russia or Scandinavia. The course considers recent shifts in the study of national cinemas that accounts for understanding the notion of “identity” in a global context. The course is open to students from across disciplines.

  
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    FILM 330/3130 - Film Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2122  

    Description
    This course provides a critical overview of the major theoretical approaches to the analysis and critique of cinematic art, including early theories of aesthetics, structure and form; modernist political and avant-garde critiques; theories of spectatorship and the cinematic apparatus; contemporary cultural studies; and theories of animation and new media. Films will be screened in class to facilitate understanding of the assigned theoretical readings. Required for Film majors. Required cumulative course for Film minors.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall or spring.
  
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    FILM 340/3140 - Documentary Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of the Director of the Film Program.

    Description
    A study of the non-fiction film, its international history, theoretical approaches to its structure and effects, and current issues in documentary production. Class screenings will be used to expose students to important and relevant examples of documentary cinema.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    FILM 000/3150 - Women and Film (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a basic history and theorization of the representation of women in cinema, filmmaking, and the field of film studies. The course engages in a historiographic analysis of feminist film theory while mapping aspects of women’s representation in cinema and her role behind the camera. The course is open to students from across disciplines, and should be of strong appeal to students majoring in psychology, sociology, anthropology, and comparative literature.

  
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    FILM 360/3160 - The Filmmaker (3 cr.)



    Description
    A detailed study of the themes, the characteristic style, development, and influence of the director within the world of cinema. The course will assess, compare, and/or contrast combinations of two to three filmmakers. Themes could inclulde empahsis on filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorcese, the Coen Brothers, Youssef Chahine, George Romero, George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Ingmar Bergman, Salah Abou-Seif, Pier Paolo Pasolini, among others.

  
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    FILM 390/3190 - Film Genres (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines questions relating to one or several generic film forms and conventions, drawing examples from Hollywood as well as from a variety of international cinemas. Topics might include the musical, comedy, horror films, film noir, the western, the historical epic, science fiction, etcetera.

  
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    FILM 352/3252 - Screenwriting (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2123  

    Description
    Provides an overview of the role of storytelling in filmmaking practice, introducing students to the techniques used by screenwriters to craft stories in both fiction and non-fiction formats and in other moving-image media such as television.

    When Offered
    Offered in Fall or Spring.
  
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    FILM 353/3253 - Digital Cinematography (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2123  

    Description
    This course focuses on developing the practical as well as aesthetic skills necessary for digital cinematography. As part of a fast emerging and increasingly dominant form of filmmaking, digital cinematography has become key in contemporary mainstream, alternative and independent filmmaking. Students will perform assignments and exercises manifesting their capacity to work with various applications of cinematographic techniques and their integration with lighting design and camera movement. This course is required for film Majors.

    When Offered
    Offered at least once per year.
    Notes
    Priority of registration in this course is given to declared Film majors and Film minors.
  
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    FILM 344/3254 - Digital Editing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2123  or consent of the Director of the Film Program.

    Description
    This course focuses on developing practical as well as aesthetic skills for digital forms of film editing. Students will engage in several assignments and exercises manifesting their capacity to work on various applications of editing techniques.

    When Offered
    Offered at least once every year.
    Notes
    Priority of registration in this course is given to declared Film majors and Film minors.
  
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    FILM 336/3306 - Sound for Picture Production (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2123  ;MUSC 2301  

    Description
    This course provides an in-depth, interactive study of sound and its relationship to picture. Topics will include post production areas relative to time code, synchronization, workflow, data interchange, sound recording and editing, lip-syncing and voice over tracks using ADR (Automatic Dialog Replacement), creating special effects with Foley, routing structures, sound mixing, and delivery methods. All of the above will be first described in class lectures and then applied practically in projects.

    Cross-listed
    Same as MUSC 3306  .
  
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    FILM 352/3352 - The Film Industry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 2122  

    Description
    This course theorizes the production, distribution, circulation, and exhibition practices of various film industries. It may include an examination of the relationship between a national film industry and other visual media; changing technologies and their impact on the medium; and connections and intersections between the film industry and other economic industries and dynamics. This course is required for Film majors.

  
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    FILM 354/3354 - Film Audience and Reception (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or consent of Visual Cultures Director.

    Description
    The course maps aspects of spectatorship, audience, and reception approaches as they intersect with experiences and study of cinema. The course provides students with tools to appreciate film as an interactive medium of communication. It explored these approaches with emphasis on spectatorial agency. Resistant and subversive reading, and hegemonic and counter-hegemonic readership and production.
     

  
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    FILM 000/3402 - Documentary Production (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 3252 , FILM 3253  and FILM 3254 


     

     

    Description
    This course develops skills and techniques for producing documentary film, including planning, shooting, interviewing, lighting, sound recording, and editing. Since the course gives only a brief, accompanying overview of the history, theory, ethics, and modalities of nonfiction film, it is required that students take FILM 3140 - Documentary Film in advance of, or at the same time as, taking FILM 3402. Group projects, screenings, readings, tutorials, lectures, and discussions prepare students to produce their own documentary films.

  
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    FILM 000/4201 - Film Directing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites


    Description
    This course provides a practical overview of the artistic and technical craft of directing films, including scripting, auditioning, working with actors, and managing production crews. Directing techniques and the employment of cinematic elements for narrative and non-narrative storytelling will be illuminated through readings, discussions, screenings, tutorials, exercises, assignments, and group projects.

  
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    FILM 450/4250 - Senior Film Project (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FILM 3254  ; MUSC 3306  

    Description
    Senior students work on making their own film projects with the participation of other film students. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will develop their project through pre-production, production, post-production phases. Attention will be given to quality excellence rather than quantity and length films.
     

    When Offered
    Offered once a year in the spring semester.
    Notes
    Enrollment in this course is restricted to students with a declared Film Major.
  
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    FILM 000/4350 - Philosophy and Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Students other than Philosophy majors must take FILM 3130  prior to registering for this course.

    Description
    This course considers the relationship between philosophical reflection and aesthetic practice through the lens of cinema, with the purpose of engaging students of both philosophy and film theory in a cross-disciplinary investigation into cinema. The course will draw both from philosophical texts on film, and classical and contemporary film theory. Topics may include epistemological, ontological and ethical questions about film; the role of memory, subjectivity, identity, and desire in cinema; time, space, and the nature of the image; perspectives on sexuality, gender, and race in film; psychoanalytic, feminist, and postcolonial film theory, and analytic and continental approaches to film and philosophy.

    Cross-listed
    PHIL 5150  
  
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    FILM 456/4356 - Experiential Learning in Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Fourth year level in the Film major or consent of the Director of the Film Program. May be taken more than once.

    Description
    This course designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain practical experience and to work and learn within the film community (production, festivals, administration, archives, research) as interns, paid employees, or volunteers. Students interested in enrolling in this course should submit a proposal to the Film Program. The proposal should be submitted for approval at least one month in advance of beginning the work. Students should also include an official letter from the host institution which has agreed to supervise their project indicating approval of the proposed student project. The host institution should also agree to provide an evaluation of the quality of the student performance within two weeks after the end of the student project.

  
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    FILM 402/4402 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    This course is restricted to senior level students in the Film Major or Minor. Departmental approval required.
     

    Description
    With departmental approval, advanced students may arrange an individualized course topic to be completed under faculty supervision.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    FILM 470/5170 - Advanced Seminar in Film Studies and Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Fourth-year Film majors only, or consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to survey and investigate various and specialized areas of film studies. Topics may include history, theory, filmmakers, national cinemas, women in film, etc. Seminars may also discuss film industry and distribution, film media, festivals, production systems, etc. Within the framework of the seminar’s general topic, each student develops his/her more focused research project. This project builds upon and develops the material discussed in class and in the required readings.

    When Offered
    Offered in Fall.
    Notes
    Students may choose to take this course twice, provided the specific area of each of the seminars falls in a different area of study, and pending approval.

Finance

  
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    FINC 303/2101 - Business Finance I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 2001  and (MACT 2222  or (DSCI 1411  and DSCI 1412 ) or (MACT 4231  and MACT 4233  ) or MACT 3224  or PSYC 2000  or SOC 3103 ) and (ENGR 3222  or ECON 2011  or ECON 2021 )

    Description
    The study of the principles of finance and their application to business enterprises. Special emphasis on financial analysis, management of working capital, cost of capital, capital budgeting, long term financing, dividend policy and internal finance.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 404/3201 - Investment Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to the theory of investments. Topics include risk and return, the theory of portfolio selection, asset pricing models, valuation for stocks, bond pricing and the term structure of interest rates and options.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 405/3401 - Applied Banking (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Measuring returns and risks in banking, evaluation of a bank’s performance, introduction to lending techniques and risk rating methods. Analyzing creditworthiness of business firms and financial institutions. Credit-management techniques such as asset protection, asset conversion and cash-flow analysis are introduced.

    When Offered
    Offered twice a year.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 408/3501 - International Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The effect of the international financial environment on the major financial decisions of business. The international financial institution and their effect on firms operating in the international environment.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 410/4202 - Capital Markets (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the structure and mechanics of financial markets coupled with a practical perspective of the use of finacial tools and their applications. It will introduce students to capital markets with global applications to various financial instruments including debt, equity and derivative securities, such as forwards, futures, and options. The course, as well, aims to widen students understanding of the various risks encountered by financial institutions and the means by which they are mitigated and managed.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in courses is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in courses specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 412/4203 - Options and Derivatives (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Overview of basic derivative securities; forwards, futures and options. The focus is on the valuation of these securities and the use of derivatives for hedging risks. More complex derivatives may be covered.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 415/4204 - Portfolio Theory and its Applications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Portfolio Theory provides students with basic concepts and models of financial theory and introduces them to the evaluation of quantity risk and return decisions. Subjects that are offered in this course: Capital assets Pricing Theory; Arbitrage Pricing Theory; Derivatives and Portfolio Selection and Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 414/4301 - Corporate Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course introduces students to basic concepts of corporate finance in the Egyptian environment. The course will cover the theory and application of capital budgeting techniques and capital structure choice of firms.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 000/4302 - Introduction to Private Equity and Direct Investments (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FINC 3201  

    Description
    This course gives an introduction to private equity and direct investments. The course reviews the theoretical foundations of private equity and valuation techniques and applies them to various aspects of private equity deals using real life cases. The course examines how private equity firms operate, how private equity deals are executed, methods used by private equity firms for identifying value as well as lessons that companies can learn from private equity.

  
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    FINC 470/4970 - Special Topics in Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FINC 3201  

    Description
    Considers selected topics of current relevance in Financial Management.

    Cross-listed
    ACCT 4004  
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 475/4975 - Independent Study in Financial Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of FINC unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
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    FINC 527/5201 - Managerial Economics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course aims at applying economic principles to managerial decision making. The course covers topics such as demand, costs and market structure and their relation to pricing, product choice and resource allocation. This course also covers Macroeconomic topics such as saving, investment and the rate of interest; the theory of inflation; and economic growth.

  
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    FINC 540/5202 - Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or ACCT 5211  

    Description
    It is a basic business finance course, dealing with various aspects of financial decision making. It provides an introduction to time value of money; bond and stock valuation; ratio analysis; financing decisions; capital budgeting; cost of capital; capital structure; risk and return; dividend policy; operating and financial leverage; and working capital management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    FINC 541/5203 - Investments and Portfolio Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201   and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    This course will examine four different types of asset markets: equity markets, fixed income markets, futures markets and options markets. It will focus on the valuation of assets in these markets, the empirical evidence on asset valuation models, and strategies that can be employed to achieve various investment goals.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    FINC 535/5204 - Applied Financial Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    This course introduces the main econometric methods and techniques used in the analysis of issues related to finance. The course will cover econometric models and their application to various financial problems such as: the testing of market efficiency, empirical testing of the various asset pricing models (CAPM, Fama French, APT), measuring and forecasting volatility of bond and stock returns (ARCH and GARCH models) and tests for market contagion amongst others.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 000/5211 - Managerial Economics in Business (1.5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Co-requisite: OPMG 5211  

    Description
    This course utilizes micro and macroeconomic analyses in formulating and executing corporate strategy. The mix of academic and applied knowledge enables students to understand how managers can maximize real shareholders’ wealth within the context of 1) the firm’s short and long-run operating cost structure, 2) static and dynamic market structures and, 3) cyclical and structural macroeconomic dynamics. Topics include nameplate capacity, capacity utilization rate, pricing policies and risk management policies among other strategic decisions such as mergers and acquisitions.

  
  •  

    FINC 000/5230 - Statistical and numerical methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course gives an introduction to numerical methods and statistics essential in a wide range of finance applications. The course consists of two main components: Numerical Methods and Statistics. 

    The topics covered in the numerical methods component include: Numerical differentiation, integration, interpolation and curve fitting (regression analysis). Solution of linear and non-linear algebraic equations. Matrix operations, and applications to solution of systems of linear equations. Introduction to numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations.

    The topics covered in the statistical component include: Probability and distribution theory. Large sample theory including the Central Limit Theorem. Elements of statistical inference including estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Introduction to regression analysis.

  
  •  

    FINC 542/5311 - International Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    This is a course on international financial markets and exchange rates. Topics include pricing in the foreign currency and use of forward exchange for hedging short-term returns and market efficiency in the international money markets, foreign currency options, international capital asset pricing, pricing of foreign currency bonds, currency swaps, syndicated loans, foreign currency financing and exposure management


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    FINC 543/5312 - Financial Institutions and Markets (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    This course will analyze the role of financial markets and financial institutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be on debt contracts and securities and on innovations in the bond and money markets. The functions of commercial banks, investment banks, and other financial intermediaries will be covered. Aspects of the regulation of these institutions will also be examined.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 512/5313 - Options and Derivatives (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  , FINC 5202  and FINC 5203  .

    Description
    This course covers a list of advanced topics in derivative securities. It assumes that students have taken an introductory course in derivatives as well as an introduction to fixed-income markets. The first part of the course develops numerical techniques which are used to implement pricing methodologies. The techniques are applied to exotic options and real options. The second part of the course develops term structure models and options based on fixed income securities.

     

     

  
  •  

    FINC 516/5314 - Real Estate Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202 

    Description
    The course introduces main elements of real estate Finance. It begins with a comprehensive introduction of mortgage from the perspective of capital market investors. The mortgage basics are then used in investment analysis of income producing properties. The public debt and equity are introduced in the third part of this course.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 518/5315 - Islamic Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202 

    Description
    Islamic Finance is one of the fastest growing and most innovative financial disciplines in the international financial markets. It is growing at a rate of 15-20 % each year. It is one of the least understood both by the western financial community and indeed by those in Islamic communities. This course offers a clear and understandable examination of this dynamic area of finance. It will help participants to fully understand the fundamental principles underlying modern Islamic finance, as well as modern practices prevailing in this industry.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 000/5320 - Financial Computing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FINC 5202  

    Description
    This course introduces students to the real world challenges of implementing machine learning based trading strategies including the algorithmic steps from information gathering to market orders. The focus is on how to apply probabilistic machine learning approaches to trading decisions. We consider statistical approaches like linear regression, Q-Learning, KNN and regression trees and how to apply them to actual stock trading situations.

  
  •  

    FINC 513/5331 - Fixed Income Securities (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202 

    Description
    This is a course on fixed-income securities and related derivatives. It covers basic analytical tools in fixed-income markets. Topics include relative pricing of fixed-income securities, forward rates, yield-to-maturity, yield-curve trading strategies and immunization techniques. It also discusses term structure models, fixed-income securities with embedded options, and derivatives with fixed-income underlying securities. Instruments to be discussed are forward rate agreements, bond and interest rate futures, interest rate swaps, fixed-income options, mortgage-backed securities, and credit derivatives. The course emphasizes analytical techniques, rather than institutional details.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 545/5333 - Private Equity and Venture Capital (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    The course focuses on private equity and venture capital cycles. Emphasis is placed on the valuation concepts and their application to privately held companies. Case studies are an integral part of the course.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 544/5351 - Advanced Corporate Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

     

    Description
    This is an advanced corporate finance course with an emphasis on debt and equity management, security issuance, and distribution policy. Topics include descriptions of types of debt and equity, tradeoffs in the choice of an optimal capital structure; the role of capital structure in competitive strategy; the design of capital structure and securities to control information problems and limit conflicts of interest between different classes of security holders; procedures and costs of issuing securities including initial public offerings, and the determinants of optimal payout policy. The course is intended for those with career objectives in financial management, the corporate finance aspects of investment banking, or general management.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    FINC 517/5352 - Financial Modeling (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  

    Description
    This is a hands on course that introduces financial concepts through analytic frameworks and financial models that can be used to identify and solve financial management issues. The course guides students through various intermediate methods and techniques of financial modeling in Microsoft Excel emphasizing the use of (1) Excel Solver for Optimization, (2) Monte Carlo Simulation and (3) Excel’s Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming language.

  
  •  

    FINC 514/5353 - Financial Risk Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    This course deals with the ways in which risks are quantified and managed by financial institutions. Among the topics covered are the nature of financial institutions and their regulation, market risk, credit risk, operational risk, liquidity risk, and the credit crisis of 2007.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 570/5370 - Selected Topics in Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ACCT 5201  and FINC 5202  .

    Description
    It considers selected topics of current relevance in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 575/5375 - Independent Study in Financial Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of FINC unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 599/5401 - Thesis (9 cr.)



    Description
    The Master thesis will ensure that students can demonstrate the ability to address a timely and original research question through relevant research methodology. The thesis should include the following components: a novel and feasible research question, a comprehensive literature review, a detailed presentation of data and methods for conducting the research and collection and analysis of data. The final outcome is a formal write-up of the thesis and a public defense in front of a panel.

     

     

     

    Hours
    Nine credit hours to be taken in three consecutive semesters

  
  •  

    FINC 590/5402 - Research Methodology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers an overview of different research methods and processes in the area of finance. The course outcome will be the completion and presentation of a comprehensive research proposal for a research study.


Gender and Women’s Studies

  
  •  

    GWST 500/5100 - Theorizing Gender (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar introduces students to the core theoretical literature and debates in the field of gender and women studies. In addition to laying the intellectual foundation for further academic work in gender and women’s studies, the seminar also engages contemporary debates on traveling theory with a particular focus on the Global South. All GWST MA students are required to take this course in their first semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    GWST 501/5101 - Visual, Literary, and Critical Approaches to Gender in MENA (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course immerses students in the literary, historical, and theoretical debates within the academic field of MENA Gender and Women’s Studies. Interdisciplinary approaches as well as varieties of theoretical positions and visual representations are discussed critically. Acknowledging the entanglements of regions, scholarly debates and political struggles, this course locates the MENA in its worldly context. 
     

    Cross-listed
    ECLT 5101  
    When Offered
    Offered yearly.
    Repeatable
    May be taken more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    GWST 502/5102 - Justice: Histories and Theories (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to justice as a problem in contemporary cultural, legal and philosophical debates. The course explores the different domains through which justice becomes a universal language of rights, and the resultant compartmentalization of human experiences along parameters in which culture is presumed to be non-existent, rendering different forms of justice, such as gender justice, appendixes to the already known. This course will engage with questions of distribution of justice - economic, social, political, historical- in the contemporary world with special focus on locating theories of justice in the practice thereof. It is conceived as laying the intellectual foundation for the GWST gender and justice graduate concentration, for graduate work in IHRLand other related fields.This is a joint course offered by the Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies and the Department of Law. This course is offered at irregular intervals. Please contact the Department of Law for information about its availability.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    GWST 504/5104 - Mobilities: Gender and Migration (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar provides an in depth engagement with the growing sub-field of Gender and Migration. Themes covered include: international gendered labor markets, migration to and from the Middle East, domestic labor, trafficking, displacement through conflict and development, remittances, and human rights. This is a joint course offered by the Center for Migration Studies and Refugee Studies and the Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GWST 506/5106 - Reading Capital (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers a reading in the genealogies of capital in order to critically engage emergent political, economic and social forms. The course examines the nexus between events, structure, agency; Marxist conceptions of the making of histories; the variety of Marxian frameworks delineating the relation between socio-economic and political rights.

    Cross-listed
    same as SOC/ANTH 5295  
  
  •  

    GWST 507/5107 - Critical Geographies: Reading the Global South (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar explores the spatial and its social, political and gendered effects with a particular focus on dispossession. It introduces students to critical work about space in the social sciences aimed towards social transformation.
     

  
  •  

    GWST 508/5108 - Women and Human Rights (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar explores the historical development of the notion of the human from the 1950’s to the present. It introduces students to women’s struggles for incorporation into human rights discourses, the consolidation of dominant regulatory processes, and their contemporary critical feminist engagements.
     

  
  •  

    GWST 000/5109 - Theorizing the Urban (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar engages debates in contemporary neoliberal urbanism with a particular focus on the global south. With more than half of the world’s population now residing in cities, the assemblages of the social laboratory are firmly grounded in the urban. The seminar explores the ongoing reconfigurations in the social laboratory: the production of gendered (raced and classed) subjectivities, housing, land, networks and livelihoods in the everyday life of diverse urban configurations.

  
  •  

    GWST 570/5170 - Special Topics in Gender and Women’s Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Alternating selected topics.

    Repeatable
    May be taken more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    GWST 580/5180 - Independent Study and Readings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Approval of IGWS Graduate Advisory Committee.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    GWST 505/5205 - Gender and Feminist Research Methodologies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to gender and feminist approaches to dominant theories of knowledge and research methodologies in the social sciences.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    GWST 599/5299 - Research Guidance and Thesis (no cr.)



    Description
    Consultation for students in problems related to their thesis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

Global Public Health

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5110 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The objectives are to educate the student in the research skills (statistics and experimental design) and mathematical applications in the data analysis required to design and conduct rigorous peer-reviewed studies in the applied sciences, inclusive of the biomedical and physical sciences, as well as public health. A sound foundation is essential in preparing and critiquing the literature, regulatory reports, and incorporating statistics in preparing a satisfactory research proposal and reporting research outcomes in an informative manner. Students will gain, through hands-on experience, exercises, and examination, the ability to use appropriate summary and inferential statistical analysis. Associations between determinants and outcomes through parametric and non-parametric measures, data transformation for multivariate analysis will be covered through exercises. The use of statistical packages suitable for scientific and public health research will be introduced. In short, students will also be able to design, experimentally and statistically, appropriate studies that can withstand appropriate peer review. The course is open to all interdisciplinary MSc and PhD students and is a core requirement in some (e.g., MPH and MSc in BIOT).

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5120 - Introduction to Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Public health practitioners and researchers, regardless of their discipline or specialty, rely on the results of epidemiologic research and often employ epidemiologic concepts, methods, and perspectives. Clinicians providing evidence-based health care do as well. This course presents a general introduction to the approach, concepts, methods, and perspectives of epidemiology for students and practitioners in a broad range of public health and related disciplines. The course employs problem-based learning where you apply the epidemiologic approach to a variety of current public health questions. Through GHHE 510 you will improve your ability to think analytically and to understand and interpret population-based and clinical research.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5130 - Environmental & Occupational Health (3 cr.)



    Description
    These courses survey local and global environmental health issues. Students will utilize selected readings and media to characterize the impact of environmental agents on human health, the environmental consequences of anthropogenic activities, and the interdependency between humans and the natural environment. The course targets graduate students in public health and those from other disciplines who are interested in research focused on public health issues. For those with biological, biomedical and medical backgrounds GHHE 520 is the required course. GHHE525 provides a survey of biological and chemical concepts not covered in undergraduate major for the non-biologist.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5135 - Environmental Health for the Non-Scientist (3 cr.)



    Description
    (intended for Engineers, chemists and physicists who may not have bioscience experience) Following a survey of key biological and chemical concepts, this course surveys local and global environmental health issues. Students will utilize selected readings and media to characterize the impact of environmental agents on human health, the environmental consequences of anthropogenic activities, and the interdependency between humans and the natural environment. The course targets graduate students in public health and those from other disciplines who are interested in research focused on public health issues. GHHE5135 provides a survey of biological and chemical concepts that may be lacking during the undergraduate major. For those with biological, biomedical and medical backgrounds GHHE 5130  is the required course.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5140 - Bioethics in Research (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will be discussion format based on ethical issues involved in health care and medical research in general, and human studies, in particular. Students will have focused reading on the ethical issues involved in medical practice and research and will apply the readings to case studies during discussion. Topics covered will include but are not limited to: Morality and research ethics, ethical issues before research committees, ethical issues involving human and animal subjects, reporting of research, and conflict of interest. All students will be required to also attain NIH Institutional Review Board (IRB) or Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee online training Certification.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5150 - Global Health Communication and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    This advanced student-faculty research course offers opportunities for students to explore the role of grassroots education modalities, including entertainment-education, a strategy for promoting healthy behavior and well-being, reducing risk, primarily in developing countries. This course examines not only “behavior” change at the individual level, but also “development” change that emphasizes changing environments and contexts (such as poverty or gender relations) in different communities that are likely to affect sustainable change. Choosing their own critical topics, students craft multiple drafts of policy papers similar to those produced by the World Health Organization and design a campaign to inform target audiences at different education levels of society.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5160 - Thesis Research



    Description
    (repeated to satisfy PhD research residency requirements)

    In consultation with the Program Director, the student will identify an appropriate area of research and mentor, if they have not done so during SCI 5940 . The student will develop a research proposal per School guidelines and as instructed in SCI 5940 . The specific topic and nature of the research will be determined by the student and mentor who will seek approval from the Program Director. On receiving approval, a committee of no less than three individuals, internal or external, will be constituted to act in an advisory capacity and for the proposal defense. On successful defense of the proposal the student will commence the research. Studies involving humans must be approved by the University’s IRB. Studies involving animals must be approved by IACUC. Projects involving laboratory data collection and management must adhere to GLP requirements.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5180 - Experimental Design and Research Methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    Qualitative research has a long history in the social sciences. Its roots can be traced to anthropology, philosophy and sociology and its use as a method of inquiry goes back to the early decades of the twentieth century. Qualitative approaches are becoming part of alternative forms of research in medicine as practitioners look at the complex health issues that are often confronted. Qualitative research tends to seek answers to problems about which little is known and its aim is to elicit explanations from the “patient’s point of view”; thus seeking the meaning or the experience of the individual. In other words, qualitative methods enable researchers to access areas of inquiry not typically amenable to quantitative research. In contrast, the use of “objective” measures based on diagnostic criteria, whether physiologically or laboratory-based often rely on numbers, but cannot be completely removed from qualitative aspects of a diagnosis. The aim of this course is to introduce some of the qualitative and quantitative research methods currently used in health care research and to explore how they can be appropriately and fruitfully employed.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5190 - Diseases and Social Perception (3 cr.)



    Description
    Diseases have meanings and those meanings translate into the way in which sufferers and society perceive and engage with their disease. Discourse on disease is often most charged when the disease in question threatens to cross borders, socioeconomic, national, or otherwise and, in these instances, the media is often complicit with “othering” the disease in a way that may have very real, material consequences. Examples from recent media coverage that have “otherized” the etiology of diseases, whether the disease covered is SARS as an Asian disease, the swine flu as a Mexican disease, Tuberculosis as an immigrant disease, or HIV/AIDs as a Haitian disease. In addition, effective therapy and support is often hampered by how social perception stigmatizes diseases such as mental illness, autism, Down syndrome and the like. This is no less so in the case of the sufferer’s self-image: when a woman undergoes a radical mastectomy, or when one is the victim of a disfiguring accident. The outcome, in terms of disease management and resources, is further influenced by the media’s shaping of society’s perception of the “disease of the day” through language. Through a look at several case studies and current literature, this course will focus on the ways in which disease takes on meaning and, in many cases, emerges as a signifier for something altogether different.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5195 - Advanced Good Laboratory Practices and Laboratory Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides training in the principles of good laboratory practice for personnel of laboratories who wish to produce test results that are fit for the purpose and which would stand up to the scrutiny of inspection. This allows for the reliability, retrieval, and accountability for test results. These procedures are applicable to diagnostic laboratory procedures, research, forensic and in the drug safety and development sector. Topics include safety, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) government regulations, and quality assurance in the laboratory. Students will learn and apply management and quality assurance skills and concepts applicable to different laboratory settings, including specimen collection, and performance per CLIA’88-and /or moderate-complexity testing. Students will also demonstrate competency in a wide variety of techniques used to collect, process and test specimens.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/5210 - Advanced Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Epidemiology investigates the distribution and trends of health-disease conditions, causes, and risks for populations. Epidemiology a dynamic and evolving discipline, considered one of the core pillars of Public Health, community or global. The overall goal of this course is providing graduate students a foundation of theory and tools to apply as a Public Health professional in research and practice settings. Students apply descriptive Epidemiology, calculate health indicators, and write Epidemiological reports for situational analysis; describe, propose, and apply appropriate study designs, and analyze health disparities. Calculation and interpretation of standard measures of frequency and association, and logistic and multiple regression are used to estimate the extent and impact of disease and injury on individuals’ lives. Students will deeply comprehend key issues in Social Determinants of Health and propose interventions to solve real life Public Health problems.

 

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