Mar 28, 2023  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 507/5282 - Quantitative Methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course aims to ensure that students understand, master and apply quantitative techniques used in modeling and decision-making related to development. More specifically, the course introduces the basic concepts of quantitative approaches to decision making. It also utilizes wide applications of quantitative techniques to analyze a variety of economic and social problems. Topics include: regression analyses, factor and cluster analysis, panel data and qualitative models.
     

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 509/5291 - An Advanced History of Economic Thought (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore, using bothprimary and secondary sources, the ideas put forth by the great economic thinkers. Class discussion will center on the immediate social impact of these ideas and the factors influencing the course of their evolutionary or revolutionary change over time. Further, this class will encourage students to think critically about the writings of the great economists and explore the possibility that ideological bias is an inexorable feature of science.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 506/5299 - Advanced Topics in Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor

     

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussion in special topics in Economics. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/1099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    A course that addresses broad intellectual concerns and is accessible to students from any major or class level.  The course is offered as part of the Freshman Level of the Core Curriculum.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/2011 - Education and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    Given our unique life experiences, we all have different worldviews regarding how education serves humanity and how it impacts the development of our societies. This introductory course will shed lights on the relationship between educational leadership and the sociology of education. Specifically, it will introduce you to a sustained inquiry into the social, cultural, historical and contemporary dynamics of education in the 21st century. You will (a) explore how formal and informal education relate to local, regional, and global trends; (b) examine, critique, and explain education in light of its origins, major influences, and consequences using a model that employs disciplines form the humanities, social sciences, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics); (c) create potential solutions that address local and global educational issues; and (d) construct meaning from readings about what education is and how culture influences teaching and learning.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/2021 - Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning (3 cr.)



    Description
    The overall goal of this course is to help students gain an understanding of the fundamental concepts of how students learn and how teachers teach. The former is achieved through a study of major classical and contemporary learning theories, while the latter is achieved through a study of knowledge of the fundamental teaching theories and what it takes to be an effective teacher. The connection between learning theories and teaching strategies will be made to link learning and teaching together. Students will be introduced to the main theories derived from neuro-scientific research. This focus will help students understand the roles of classroom teachers and how this should be based on explicit knowledge of learning theories. In addition, the basics of classroom assessment and lesson planning will be covered.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/2041 - Education in Historic & Modern Cairo (3 cr.)



    Description
    How were Egyptian citizens educated during different historical periods? This course explores the answer of this question through the experiential learning pedagogy based on Kolb’s theory of learning that requires concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization and active experimentation. With this theoretical background, the course includes field trips to “Historic Cairo” and its distinguished masterpieces of medieval art and architecture, museums, churches and mosques of central significance in Egyptian history. The overall goal of this course is to help undergraduate students take advantage of the various learning opportunities that are available in the rich laboratory of Cairo through a comprehensive interdisciplinary course. The course brings together students from various disciplines, such as engineering, arts, and the sciences.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/2099 - Selected Topics in Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course addresses contemporary issues in education and is open to all students regardless of major. May be taken more than once if content changes.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/3011 - Educating Children and Youth for a Sustainable Future (3 cr.)



    Description
    The natural resources available on planet earth are declining due to people’s misuse of these resources. This course presents the knowledge, skills and dispositions children and youth need in order to successfully meet the challenges and opportunities that await them as agents of change in a sustainable global development context, to preserve the planet’s resources. Through this course, students will achieve an understanding of education for sustainable development (ESD), how is it defined, why it is needed and how to infuse it into the educational system. ESD is perceived as a need for this generation and future generations in Egypt and elsewhere, for thinking about a future in which environmental, societal, and economic considerations are balanced, in the pursuit of development and improved quality of life.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/3021 - Educational Assessment and Instructional Design (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course is an introduction to educational assessment and its interdependent relationship with the design of instructional experiences. Traditional and alternative methods of assessment are covered, with the aim of helping students understand the design and implications of these assessments as well as apply some of them to instructional tasks. The course will also expose students to current issues related to the use of assessment in terms of policy, accountability, teaching, learning, and supporting diverse groups of students.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/3031 - Education, Civil Society and International Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    EDUC 2011  and EDUC 2021  

    Description
    This course explores the changing roles of civil society in education and development, with a special emphasis on intergovernmental organizations, NGOs, community-based associations, and grassroots movements. The course introduces students to different educational ideologies for analyzing the relationships among civil society, citizenship and human development. Included are the corresponding themes of: democratic citizenship; national and global models of education for a competitive global free market; local and global network of human rights and peace education; and environmental movements and education in a global civil society. This is an interdisciplinary course for students interested in philosophical, social, economic, political or global studies.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/4031 - Gender and Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This class addresses the changing, but continuing, patterns of marginalization, power, authority, and unequal expectations, opportunities, and treatment through educational and social systems for all students, female and male. The focus is on historical, contemporary, and cultural contexts. A number of ways will be explored on how gender is played out, structured, reproduced and transformed in contemporary formal settings (classrooms from preschool to university) and informal settings (non-classrooms). Foundational issues to be investigated include: how gender complicates disciplinary knowledge (and vice versa), the (de) constructing and reinforcing of genders (via science, schooling, and social expectations), implications for teaching, society, and social justice as well as relationships among different cultural categories. Different narrative sources will be utilized, including biography, popular culture, primary source materials, and artifacts. This will be a multi-disciplinary class with material drawn from sociology, gender & women’s studies, history, and other fields, with specific application to educational policy and practice.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/4098 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Participants in this seminar will consider a significant current educational issue from multiple academic and professional perspectives. Open to all senior students regardless of major.

  
  •  

    EDUC 511/5201 - Foundations of Educational Research (3 cr.)



    Description
    The fundamental aim of this course is to assist MA candidates to develop the knowledge and skills essential to the identification and critical evaluation of educational research relevant to their professional interests and contexts. In the process, learners will become familiar with key issues in qualitative and quantitative research in the field of international and comparative education, and be able to distinguish between good and poor research.

    Notes
    This pre-requisite course must be taken in the first or second semester of study.
  
  •  

    EDUC 521/5202 - Social Foundations of Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    Using a multidisciplinary approach, the course will examine the underlying issues within contemporary educational policies, practices and theories. The course will draw on humanities and social science disciplines to foster the development of MA student’s interpretive, normative and critical perspectives on education both inside and outside of schools. It will also assist students as they explore the relationship of education (formal and informal) to societal, regional and global issues.

    Notes
    This pre-requisite course must be taken in the first or second semester of study.
  
  •  

    EDUC 531/5203 - Introduction to International & Comparative Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces MA students to the origins and development of the field of international and comparative education. The course addresses current educational concerns both on local and international levels, such as purposes of schooling, educational access and opportunity, education accountability and authority, teacher professionalism, and impact of globalization on education. The course also explores the relationship between education and national development, and deepens student’s understanding of methodological approaches to comparative and international education research.

  
  •  

    EDUC 541/5204 - Human Development & Learning Theory (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an introduction to human growth and development from infancy to adulthood. Emphasis is placed on the integration of various aspects of development, including cognitive, linguistic, social-emotional, and motor. Students will study theoretical and empirical advances in learning, including neuro-cognitive research, to understand learning from formal (school, university) perspectives, as well as social, informal perspectives.

  
  •  

    EDUC 551/5205 - Foundations of Instructional Practice (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an introduction to methods of instruction at primary, secondary, and higher education levels. While pragmatic concerns such as classroom management, lesson planning, differentiation, modes of learning, and standards-based instruction will all be covered, the course will emphasize theories and empirical evidence regarding various strategies, techniques, and philosophies of instruction. Curriculum development, assessment, and student-centered learning approaches will be covered.

  
  •  

    EDUC 532/5211 - Globalization, Development, and Educational Reform in the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course surveys policy and reform issues of education in the Arab World, with focus on specific initiatives and how they fit into the context of policy, culture, and economics. The course will examine traditional and non-traditional methods of teaching, school organization, and educational policy-making and will seek to understand how globalized reform initiatives, often instigated through development projects, have impacted those methods. Resulting modes of governance, policy and practice will be analyzed.

  
  •  

    EDUC 533/5212 - Comparative Gender, Adolescent, Youth, and Human Development Policy (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore gender, adolescent youth, and human development policy from a global perspective. The course will examine issues of gender with regard to social and education disparities, as well as women’s rights in comparative and international perspectives. It will also target the changing roles of youth and adolescents in society and the rights and responsibilities of young people. Particular attention will be given to the relationships between educational practices, systems, and policies and their relationship to life-work outcomes.

  
  •  

    EDUC 535/5213 - Educational Evaluation & Assessment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Contemporary educators are expected to know how to assess and evaluate the knowledge and performance of students, teachers, staff members, and themselves. In today’s reform-minded, information-based society, practitioners must be able to frame problems accurately, collect appropriate data, and analyze the information using acceptable approaches. This course will use a comparative approach, to help MA students learn to: (a) frame a problem using various approaches; (b) identify appropriate data; (c) analyze data; and (d) develop and evaluate alternative solutions to a defined problem. Students will also learn how to utilize current models and methods of assessment in educational contexts.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 536/5214 - Human Rights-based Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course surveys issues and specialized topics in human rights-based education policy, practice, and research. The course focuses on issues of educational availability and access in terms of gender, location, and fees; additionally, it focuses on access to education in conflict areas. The course also focuses on the rights of children in both formal educational environments and within communities. The course will explore these issues through cases and empirical research.

  
  •  

    EDUC 575/5215 - Educational Policy Analysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the policy cycle and contextual factors that influence decisions, by enabling and refining student’s analytic skills. Topics will include the analysis of how policy is created; the ideal and actual forms of the policy cycle; how to create sustainable feedback systems; how to use appropriate analytic approaches to the study of data; and how to use appropriate analytic techniques to analyze policy choices.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 588/5216 - Research-Based Comparative Approaches to Educational Reform (3 cr.)



    Description
    Following an interdisciplinary approach, the course focuses on the reform of educational policy and practices at national, regional, and international levels. The course aims at acquainting students with educational reform trends and approaches including sector reform and school-based reform; developing students’ analytical skills of reform initiatives and outcomes in different countries; developing students’ research skills related to the monitoring and evaluation of reform projects; and promoting the approach of lifelong learning among students as researchers and reflective practitioners.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 534/5217 - Strategic Educational Planning and Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    Education and development are often considered strategically together. This course will examine, from an educational lens, the implications of educational planning in a country’s development. In particular, the course will examine the role of educational policy on the economy, cultural hegemony, and politics. Students will study human capital theory in relationship to various educational strategies. Students will also understand the economic tradeoffs in education as a strategy for development.

  
  •  

    EDUC 542/5221 - Transformational Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    Effective leaders recognize the interrelated nature of organizations and their environments. They understand that they need different leadership behaviors for different situations and contexts and are aware of how various constituents (i.e., administrators, teachers, parents, and students) interact within and across the domains of an organization. Finally, effective leaders behave in ways that nurture a desire in others to increase their individual and collective effectiveness. This course looks specifically at leadership in multiple educational venues within a global setting by looking at the cognitive (theoretical), intrapersonal (characteristics of a leader) and interpersonal (relational & contextual) aspects of leadership. This includes looking at organizations, team leading, formal and informal leadership.
    In addition, this course will introduce students to leadership theories which they will use to analyze organizational structures and determine the leadership style needed to transform educational settings. Specifically, Students will examine elements of leadership and explore how effective leaders create successful school change and innovation. Students will analyze case studies and leadership styles. The course content and activities encourage and promote students to be educational change agents. Students will study leadership traits, negotiation skills and change strategies in their own leadership and consider the effectiveness of these characteristics in different circumstances and/or cultural settings. Attention will also be directed to using facilitative power to make second order changes.

  
  •  

    EDUC 544/5222 - School Governance and Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the allocation of resources to support both student and faculty learning and the effective management of school operations to insure a safe and secure environment, conducive to learning. The course will cover the application of research on effective schools, models of supervision and leadership theory and implementation; it will also investigate the interconnectedness of instructional supervision, educational leadership and school governance and management.

  
  •  

    EDUC 546/5223 - Organizational Theory and Educational Institutions (3 cr.)



    Description
    Educational organizations - schools in particular - are complex environments that are considered to have competing demands. This course seeks to identify the organizational facets of educational institutions that either enhance or obstruct meaningful educational reform. By examining sociological, political, economic, and technical features of educational organizations, this course will expose opportunities for leadership-based change in these organizations.

  
  •  

    EDUC 573/5224 - Research-based Instructional Leadership (3 cr.)



    Description
    The task of improving teaching and learning in the classroom is one that all school administrators face. This course explores the theory and practice of instructional supervision within a school culture and its critical importance to student achievement. It focuses on the principal as the instructional leader in the school.


     

  
  •  

    EDUC 552/5231 - Online and Blended Learning Design and Instruction in Developing Countries (3 cr.)



    Description
    Online and blended learning have become commonplace instructional modalities all over the world. Integrating them into developing countries and Arab contexts presents its own challenges and opportunities. The first part of the course will focus on research related to the latter. The main part of the course will focus on design, assessment, and teaching principles for online and blended learning. Students will engage in real-world projects that involve the application of these principles to their own contexts. The final part will discuss the implications of some trends such as MOOCs and social media for instruction in the region. The course is relevant for educators and designers in both K-12 and higher education settings.

  
  •  

    EDUC 554/5232 - Literacy, Learning and Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    The primary goal of this course is to introduce new views of what literacy and learning are, and the consequent changes in their relationship to education.Topics will include: differentiating elite from mass literacy; the role of literacy in schooling; the application of these concepts to instruction in classroom settings (Pre-K-12 and higher education); and how the continuing evolution of these concepts may change their relationship to education yet again in future.

  
  •  

    EDUC 556/5233 - Action Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course will lead students into action research, a form of self-reflective systematic inquiry by practitioners on their own practice. The process of action research will assist students in assessing needs, documenting the steps of inquiry, analyzing data, and making informed decisions that can lead to desired educational outcomes. The course will equip students with research tools that can be used to contribute to school renewal and instructional improvement. Students will also learn about the four types of action research: collaborative, critical, classroom, and participatory. Finally, the course will critically examine a selected number of case studies from various regions.

  
  •  

    EDUC 557/5234 - Reaching Diverse and Underserved Learners (3 cr.)



    Description
    Traditional methods of teaching have been unable to meet the needs of all learners. Students with physical and learning disabilities, students for whom the language of instruction is not their first language, and students who come from impoverished backgrounds all tend to struggle to learn and demonstrate academic proficiency in traditional models of education. This course explores the methods of differentiation and the theoretical foundations of special education, second language instruction, and education of impoverished students. It provides an introduction to each of these areas by providing explicit classroom strategies while providing the underlying theoretical conditions for these strategies.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/5236 - Education for Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    The overall goal of this course is to help MA candidates achieve a deeper understanding of Education for Sustainable Development as a societal need for Egypt with an emphasis on STE2 AM education. We will examine the goals, strategies, and elements of Education for Sustainable Development as we consider “What is Education for Sustainability?” Our work will focus on using the “lens of sustainability”– considering the overlapping perspectives of the environment, the economy, equity and social justice- to frame learning  in formal and non-formal/ informal education settings and partnerships and collaboration between them. What knowledge, skills and dispositions do students need in order to successfully meet the challenges and opportunities that await them as agents of change in an ESD global context? What pedagogies could be utilized to present ESD issues in an interdisciplinary manner bringing together disciplines of science, technology, engineering, arts, humanities, and mathematics? Through exemplars and case studies, participants will be provided with opportunities to critically evaluate ESD policies and practices through an international lens focusing on theories and pedagogical practices. Furthermore, there will be analysis to different curricula design for sustainability components and to the challenges they encounter. This will help focus on how to develop interdisciplinary learning material that is the core essence of ESD and STEAM education and relevant to the community local needs in Egypt.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/5238 - Programs and Environments for Inclusive Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents theoretical information as well as practical examples of programs and environments that can benefit all learners. Methods of instructional planning will be covered, with a focus on how teachers can provide enriched learning environments for all learners.There is a focus on both the cognitive and social-emotional development of learners, in order to enable the educators enrolled in the class to create a cohesive community of learners in their future classrooms.

  
  •  

    EDUC 562/5241 - Pedagogy & Theory of Modern Teaching & Learning in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides students with an overview of trends, theories, principles, and practices in higher education instruction, including online learning and associated instructional models. Beginning with a focus on adult learning theory, as well as learning theories especially associated with traditional university-aged students, the course will provide both general and disciplinary-specific trends in content delivery and skill development. The course will examine new models of delivery in contexts of both learning theories and institutional missions. Students will conduct research projects that involve classroom observation, student outcome data analysis, and teacher and learner interviews, all with the purpose of providing specific guidance on instructional improvement from both and an organizational a classroom perspectives.

     

  
  •  

    EDUC 563/5242 - Theories of Student Development in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines patterns of intellectual, identity, and social development among older adolescents and adults, and how these relate to learning and development of desired outcomes of postsecondary education. It is designed to introduce graduate students to major theoretical perspectives, the research based on these theories, and how this body of theory and research can be used to guide the design of educational policies and practices in colleges and universities to promote college student learning and development.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 564/5243 - Policy and Administration in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an overview of both the organizational theories associated with higher education and the trends and practices in policy and administration of higher education. The course includes the role of governance and how it influences organizational structure, policy, and leadership. In addition, the course provides comparative knowledge on the impact of policies and organizational structures on resource allocation, learning outcomes, student satisfaction, labor market satisfaction, and other characteristics. Along with certain traditional elements of college and university life, we will be examining powerful forces radically altering post-secondary education.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/5259 - Selected Topics in International & Comparative Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents students with major education debates, practices and challenges which face educators around the world. The course addresses both persistent and emerging themes in learning, teaching, policy making, and educational leadership in schools and in higher education. The course may be taken twice if the topic is different.

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/5265 - Applied Projects in Inclusive Education (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    PSYC 5205  , EDUC 5204  , EDUC 5238  

    Description
    This is a hands-on course that will help students integrate theoretical acquired knowledge into their professional practice. The course will enhance the student’s ability to utilize reflective, experiential, and pragmatic pedagogic approaches in order to teach for diverse learners effectively. The course aims at promoting the facilitation of learning through peer observation, critical friends groups, and cognitive coaching. The 5265 course should be taken in the final semester of the diploma, after the student has completed PSYC 5205 , EDUC 5204 , and EDUC 5238 . It can be taken concurrently with either PSYC 5255  or EDUC 5232  

    Cross-listed
    PSYC 5265  
  
  •  

    EDUC 595/5281 - Supervised Fieldwork (3 cr.)



    Description
    This practical course provides participants with opportunities to interact in fieldwork settings, whether as classroom teachers or school-level educational leaders. Students complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork, with the distribution of activities based on the student’s background and interests, and with the agreement of the student’s advisor. Each student must participate in at least three different types of fieldwork activities, which could include peer observation, group-based interaction, observation by a qualified supervisor or mentor, or other parallel activity. Required of MA students who have never taken a documented fieldwork course with extensive classroom and/or school-based experience.
     

    Notes
    This course will be graded Pass-Fail.
  
  •  

    EDUC 580/5282 - Independent Study in International & Comparative Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent study in various areas of International & Comparative Education. To be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings and assignments are required, and frequent consultations are held.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 000/5288 - Comprehensive Exam (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Final semester before graduation

    Description
    Students prepare for comprehensive examinations, in lieu of a thesis.

  
  •  

    EDUC 593/5293 - Capstone Project (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    .

    Description
    Students undertake a capstone project related to their concentration, approved by student’s advisor and two faculty readers. The capstone should be an applied project, firmly grounded in a theoretical framework and a rigorous literature review.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 599/5299 - Research Guidance and Thesis (2 cr.)



    Description
    Guidance and approval of thesis research.


Egyptology

  
  •  

    EGPT 199/1099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to students as part of the Freshman Level of the Core Curriculum.

  
  •  

    EGPT 202/2020 - Ancient Egypt: An Introduction (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to history, society, religion, art and architecture of Ancient Egypt, including a description of the nature and character of the field of Egyptology. The continuing impact of Ancient Egypt on subsequent societies and cultures including that of modern Egypt will be examined.

    When Offered
    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EGPT 203/2030 - Introduction to Egyptian Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Only open to declared architecture majors and Egyptology majors.

    Description
    A basic class on Egyptian architecture, comprised of a brief introduction to the culture of the ancient Egyptians, followed by a series of lectures dealing with Egyptian architecture, the typology of Egyptian architecture, and the role it played in Egyptian society and culture. The raw materials and tools used by the Egyptians will be covered, as well as some of the motifs used in the buildings, and their ideas about architecture, including their use of light, water, and space in the buildings. The course includes sections on temples, tombs, and, with a brief discussion of urban planning. The course will conclude with a section on Egypt’s legacy to architecture, and how the use of the grammar of architecture changes over time. Field-trips will also constitute an important part of the course and will, in some cases, take the place of class-time.

  
  •  

    EGPT 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 204/2210 - Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The methods and theories of archaeological excavation and interpretation; archaeological evidence of human cultural development; archaeology as a social science.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 250/2250 - Ancient Egyptian Literature in Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will analyze Ancient Egyptian literary texts, including folk tales, myths, wisdom literature and poetry, in order to present ancient Egyptian culture through its literature and make students appreciate the depth and high level of this advanced culture in such an early period of Egypt’s long history.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 253/2251 - Hieroglyphics I (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces the student to the study of classical Egyptian script, grammar and hieroglyphic texts of the Middle Kingdom.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    EGPT 254/2252 - Hieroglyphics II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course is a continuation of   . Students will concentrate on the verbal forms of classical Egyptian.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    EGPT 301/3010 - Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Instructor’s consent

    Description
    The class examines Egypt’s history and geography and devotes special attention to the effect of geography and natural resources upon the development of Ancient Egyptian history, art, and civilization.
    Prerequisites instructors consent

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 361/3201 - Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course covers the period between the Predynastic and the Middle Kingdom and includes: reliefs, statuary, architecture, and minor arts, illustrated with images. The class focuses on learning how to look at and to analyze Egyptian art and to place it in its context. This course involves a significant amount of memorization that enables the student to create a mental data-bank that is useful when putting excavated material in context and in analyzing Egyptian art. There will be field-trips to the museum and to Giza and Saqqara durign the semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 362/3202 - Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course covers the period betweem the Middle Kingdom and the Ptolemaic Period. It includes: reliefs, statuary, architecture, and minor arts, illustrated with images. The class focuses on identifying the basic principles of Egyptian art and architecture, learning how to look at and to analyze Egyptian art and to place it in its context. There will be field-trips to the museum and to other sites, possibly including Luxor, during the semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 343/3211 - History of Ancient Egypt I: Pre-Dynastic Through Middle Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the history of Egypt from the Predynastic period to the Middle Kingdom. The course focuses on the ‘official’ history of Egypt rather than the cultural/social history which is covered in a separate course. The scope of ‘official’ history includes: the rise of the Egyptian state, the different rulers of Egypt and their contributions to the state in terms of buildings, religious changes and foreign policy, the economy, social organization, and Egypt’s foreign relations. Literary souces will be augmented by archaeological evidence. Field trips to archaeological sites in the Cairo area are an obligatory aspect of the course.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 344/3212 - History of Ancient Egypt II: Middle Kingdom through Ptolemaic Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the history of Egypt from the Middle Kingdom to the end of Pharaonic history. The course focuses on the ‘official’ history of Egypt rather than the cultural/social history that is covered in a separate course. The scope of ‘official’ history includes: the different rulers of Egypt and their contributions to the state in terms of buildings, religious changes and foreign policy, the economy, social organization, and Egypt’s foreign relations. Literary sources will be augmented by archaeological evidence. Field trips to archaeological sites are an important component of the course.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 403/4030 - Independent Study in Egyptology (1-3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent research projects in Egyptology, with consent of instructor and student’s adviser.

    When Offered
    Offered every semester.
  
  •  

    EGPT 440/4040 - Ancient Egyptian Religion and Ethics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.

    Description
    The course will examine in detail the beliefs and religious institutions of the Ancient Egyptians. Special attention will be devoted to official and popular religions, and to their manifestation in architecture as well as in the literature of Ancient Egypt.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 000/5030 - Independent Study and Guided Readings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Department approval.

    Description
    Guided individual readings and/or research on a subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member that is beyond the scope of what is offered.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be taken only twice.
  
  •  

    EGPT 304/5100 - Culture and Society of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

      and HIST 2902  .

    Description
    The course identifies the basic structure of ancient Egyptian society and culture, and places special emphasis upon the interaction of economics, social organization, environment, law, politics, and religion.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    EGPT 510/5100 - Culture and Society of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course will cover the cultural, technological, and social history of ancient Egypt, with an emphasis on using primary sources and, if appropriate, experimental work. The subject matter covered includes the social organization of Egypt, the economy, agriculture, food, medicine, crafts, building methods, family structure, etc.



     

  
  •  

    EGPT 341/5110 - Egypt in the First Millennium BC (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course covers the history of Egypt during the first millennium BC (1069-332 BC), a period characterized by much internal conflict and long periods of foreign domination. It examines the factors that led to the demise of Egypt’s New Kingdom, traces the rise of the Libyan and Nubian dynasties, and the subsequent annexation of Egypt by the Persian Empire. Special Attention will be devoted to the last dynasties of the Pharaonic tradition, Dynasties XXI-XXX.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 000/5111 - Egyptomania (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will enable students to recognize Egyptianizing art and architecture in Egypt and around the world and to understand its religious, social, and ideological origins. Students will also gain an understanding of Ancient Egypt’s cultural impact on the world.

  
  •  

    EGPT 530/5120 - Graeco-Roman Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will explore the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 342/5120 - History of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Era (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course will study the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD. It will also examine the social consequences of the spread of Christianity in Egypt and the rise of Coptic culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 512/5130 - Art, Societies, and Cultures of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course provides students with an overview of the prehistory and early historical periods of the ancient Near East. Considerable attention is given to the fundamental transitions which occurred in this region. In particular, we will examine: (1) the first emergence of settled village life, hierarchical social organization and the domestication of plants and animals during the Neolithic period; (2) the rise of urban centers, temple and palace elites and writing; (3) the emergence and spread of the states and subsequent militaristic empires which became the dominant political force in the ancient Near East for several millennia. This course examines both archaeological and historical evidence with a heavy emphasis on material culture, primary archaeological and historical data and the process of scholarly interpretation.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 346/5130 - Societies and Culture of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course constitutes a historical overview of the societies and cultures of Egypt, the Mediterranean world and the Middle East, from the emergence of urban society in Iraq in the fourth millennium BC to the rise and fall of the great empires of Babylon, Assyria, the Hitties, Achaemenid Persia, Greece and Rome. Special attention will be paid to the position of Ancient Egyptian civilization within the wider context of Ancient Near Eastern history.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 348/5140 - Societies and Cultures of Ancient Nubia (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent or of instructor.

    Description
    The course will survey the emergence of food-producing societies in Nubia and the Sudan from 6000 BC, and will examine the development of Nubian civilization from the Kerma culture and the kingdoms of Kush and Meröe to the advent of Islam. Special attention will be devoted to the interaction between Egyptian and Nubian civilizations.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 521/5140 - Societies and Cultures of Ancient Nubia (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is intended to serve as a broad survey of the development of history, culture and society in Nubia and the Northern Sudan from the earliest era of food production (ca. 6000-4000 BCE/BC) to the development of the medieval kingdoms of Nubia (ca. 600-700 CE/AD). Special attention will be devoted to the question of the relations - cultural, commercial, technological, political - between Ancient Egypt and Ancient Nubia. For the purposes of this class, the term “Nubia” will mean the long stretch of the Nile Valley that extends between the Nile’s First Cataract (located in Southern Egypt just south of the city of Aswan) and its Sixth Cataract (located in the Sudan some distance north of the city of Khartoum). The term “Nubian” will describe the people of this specific area as well as all the distinctive languages and cultures that flourished here from the beginning of recorded history to the early modern period.

  
  •  

    EGPT 400/5150 - Introduction to Coptic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Coptic represents the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language. The course will include reading of selected texts in two Coptic dialects.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 505/5150 - Introduction to Coptic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or basic hieroglyphs.

    Description
    Coptic represents the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language. The course will include reading of selected texts in two Coptic dialects.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 353/5151 - Hieroglyphics III (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Students will read a number of Egyptian texts and learn how to translate and interpret written documents.

    When Offered
    Offered every fall.
  
  •  

    EGPT 500/5151 - Hieroglyphics III (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Students will read a number of Egyptian texts and learn how to translate and interpret written documents.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered every fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 401/5152 - Introduction to Hieratic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Hieratic is a script derived from hieroglyphics used mainly on papyrus. The course is a study of this script through reading selected texts literary, religious, or administrative- related to daily life in ancient Egypt .

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 402/5153 - Hieroglyphics IV (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The course consists of further reading of Egyptian texts with an introduction to the new Egyptian language of the later periods of Pharaonic history. In order to introduce students to epigraphy, they are required to copy and study texts from the Cairo Museum.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    EGPT 501/5153 - Hieroglyphics IV (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Hieroglyphics I-III or equivalent

    Description
    The course consists of further reading of Egyptian texts with an introduction to the new Egyptian language of the later periods of Pharaonic history. In order to introduce students to epigraphy, they are required to copy and study texts from Cairo Museum.


     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 000/5154 - Late Egyptian (3 cr.)



    Description
    This class introduces students to the language and literature of Egypt’s New Kingdom. Late Egyptian is a unique stage of Egyptian in which the vernacular found its way into the textual record. By the end of this course, students will be able to read a variety of literary and non-literary texts.

  
  •  

    EGPT 445/5160 - Selected Topics in Coptic Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course allows instructors to offer a topic in Coptic Studies. The topic will be chosen from year to year in coordination with the departments concerned and the dean of the School of HUSS, and according to the individual interests and areas of expertise of the instructors. Topics chosen may include various aspects of Coptic art and history, monasticism, folklore, or other subjects. The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  , , , , and  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall
    Repeatable
    The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.
    Notes
    Students in these majors may petition preferably before registration to have the course included in their major requirements.
  
  •  

    EGPT 539/5160 - Selected Topics in Coptic Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course allows instructors to offer a topic in Coptic Studies. The topic will be chosen from year to year in coordination with the departments concerned and the dean of the School of HUSS, and according to the individual interests and areas of expertise of the instructors. Topics chosen may include various aspects of Coptic art and history, monasticism, folklore, or other subjects.
    The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.
    Students in these majors may petition preferably before registration to have the course included in their major requirements.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  , , , ,  
  
  •  

    EGPT 459/5170 - Selected Topics in Cultural Resource Management and Museology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course deals with different types of cultural heritage present in Egypt and their physical and cultural environment, and with the various methods of managing them in order to ensure their proper preservation while making them accessible to tourists and scholars. At the instructor’s discretion, the course may also provide an understanding of the role of museums in the modern world and the basic methodology and practice of museum management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 545/5170 - Selected Topics in Cultural Resource Management and Museology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course deals with different types of cultural heritage present in Egypt and their physical and cultural environment, and with the various methods of managing them in order to ensure their proper preservation while making them accessible to tourists and scholars. At the instructor’s discretion, the course may also provide an understanding of the role of museums in the modern world and the basic methodology and practice of museum management.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 540/5180 - Advanced Method and Theory: Archaeological and Historical (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This seminar is geared to providing a methodological basis and theoretical approach for both the disciplines of archaeology and history. More time and emphasis will be put on the archaeological, however, as it is the more basic discipline in Egyptology.

     


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 491/5191 - Field Work (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor.

    Description
    Preference will be given to majors in Egyptology, anthropology, archaeology. Inquiries concerning the course must be made no fewer than seven months prior to the start of the summer semester for participation in archaeological and/or epigraphic fieldwork in Egypt. Sites and projects will vary.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    EGPT 591/5191 - Field Work (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor.

    Description
    Preference will be given to majors in Egyptology. Field-work may take the form of epigraphy, excavation, survey, or museum work. Inquiries concerning the course must be made no fewer than seven months prior to the start of the summer semester.

     

    Cross-listed
    same as  .
  
  •  

    EGPT 519/5199 - Selected Topics in Ancient Egyptian Art and Culture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The topic of this course changes regularly and can be taken more than once. The subject matter chosen for the course can be any aspect of ancient Egyptian art, architecture, archaeology and culture.

     

  
  •  

    EGPT 499/5199 - Selected Topics in Egyptology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: junior standing and/or consent of instructor.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    EGPT 522/5220 - Ancient Egyptian Religion and Ethics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will investigate ancient Egyptian religious beliefs and practices, their origin, and development. The great mythic Solar Cycle of creation and Osirian Cycle of betrayal and revenge, death and rebirth are discussed, as well as the place of the myriad local and minor Gods and Goddesses within Egyptian mythology. The interaction of sacred and secular in Egyptian society is considered through the nature of divine kingship, large temple institutions, and funerary foundations. The relationship between the state cults and private worship by noble and commoner is explored, and the nature and potency of ancient Egyptian magic and curses investigated. The nature and development of Egyptian funerary beliefs are also detailed.

  
  •  

    EGPT 525/5230 - Settlement and Daily Life in Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar introduces students to the material culture of the ancient Egyptians, specifically that of their settlements and daily life. The seminar concentrates on the archaeological evidence from settlements of the three most important periods of ancient Egyptian civilization: the Old, Middle and New Kingdoms. The seminar will first discuss urban settlement patterns in ancient Egypt, and secondly the processes by which material assemblages form in settlements. The plans and structure of dwellings will also be considered along with the material evidence found inside of them.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 526/5240 - Death and Burial in Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will cover the funerary practices and beliefs of ancient Egypt from the Old Kingdom to the Graeco-Roman period. The subject matter covered will include the process of mummification and the spells used during the operation; the development of coffins, sarcophagi, amulets, canopic jars, canopic chests, shabtis, and other tomb furnishings; the evolution of the tomb, both royal and private, and any symbolic values that might be attached to the decoration and architecture; funerals, the cult of the dead, economic foundations supporting the tomb, and the religious rituals associated with funerals, the afterlife, and the mortuary cult. Experimental archaeology (mummification) might be involved in this class.

     

  
  •  

    EGPT 532/5310 - Classical Art and Archaeology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the techniques and methods of Classical Archaeology as revealed through an examination of the major monuments and artefacts of the Greek and Roman world from Prehistory to the Late Empire. Architecture, sculpture, fresco painting, and the minor arts are examined at such sights as Mycenae, Olympia, Athens, Pompeii, and Rome.

  
  •  

    EGPT 531/5320 - The Romano-Byzantine World and Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to familiarise students with the material and historical culture of the Late Antique and Byzantine periods, with an emphasis on the geographical area of the eastern Mediterranean and Egypt. This course includes direct experience with actual works of Late Antique and Byzantine visual culture.

  
  •  

    EGPT 533/5330 - Coptic Art and Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    A course designed to introduce students to Coptic art and architecture, with an emphasis on monasticism. Field trips are required.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 541/5420 - Material Culture: Looking at Artifacts in Context (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course will provide an overview of different types of objects from funerary, ritual, and quotidian contexts, with special museum sessions. It is designed to familiarize students with different types of material culture of ancient Egypt so that they can identify and work with objects confidently, in museums or on excavations.

     

  
  •  

    EGPT 542/5430 - Site Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is intended for students to learn about the history of a site in preparation for working at it, or on excavated material from it. They will choose sites and research its excavation history, as well as tracing back any documentation culled from the accounts of Eastern and Western travellers and historians. Understanding, using, and critiquing site reports will form part of the course, as well as learning to ask questions of the data. Site visits, local accounts, and modern imaging techniques should be used in order to understand and explore the past and present of the chosen site.
     

  
  •  

    EGPT 560/5440 - The Iconography of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    A course In Egyptian art.

    Description
    The civilization of ancient Egypt left behind a vast material culture, both inscribed and decorated. An important part of a student’s understanding of ancient Egypt is to be able to recognize and understand the attributes and symbols recorded and depicted on ancient Egyptian monuments. This class is designed to draw upon students’ understanding of hieroglyphs, art and religion, and apply their knowledge to the comprehension of the iconography in tombs, temples, and in the minor arts.

     

  
  •  

    EGPT 504/5510 - Advanced Hieratic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    The class consists of more advanced readings from the different stages of the hieratic writing, the different hands encountered, and the different categories of texts. Although this course will focus primarily on Palaeography, the translation of these texts will also familiarize students with aspects of the culture they may not necessarily have come across as undergraduates. They will also enhance their training in grammar and improve their knowledge of the Ancient Egyptian Language in general.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 502/5520 - Introduction to Demotic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Equivalency to advanced hieroglyphs.

    Description
    Demotic is a cursive script derived from Hieratic, and rooted in Hieroglyphics. It emerged in the 7th century B.C. and remained in use in parallel with Hieroglyphics and Hieratic, and later also with Coptic until the Byzantine Period, when the latter language took over. The Egyptian Language in its Demotic manifestation has further developed and new grammatical forms and vocabulary have appeared. In this class students will learn Demotic and work on a series of different texts.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 503/5530 - Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
         or equivalent.

    Description
    Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs are mostly used for historic or religious texts of the Greco-Roman Period. Although the hieroglyphic signs are mostly known, the scribes assign different phonetic values to them based on a different system that needs to be understood and practiced. Religious texts in the Greco Roman Period are written in a more elaborate manner, with more details and explanatory glosses and are, therefore very important for a better understanding of Ancient Egyptian religion and its development across time.

 

Page: 1 <- 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14Forward 10 -> 25