May 21, 2024  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

English

  
  • ELIN 99/0102 - Advanced English (0 cr.)



  
  • ELIN 120/0301 - Intermediate English (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  • ELIN 000/0399 - Special Topics for English Language Learning (0 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Specified per topic

    Description
    Topics related to innovative English language learning, including academic reading, speaking, and listening.

  
  • ENGL 100/0210 - Academic English for the Liberal Arts (0 cr.)



    Description
    ENGL 0210 is a non-credit, concurrent, conference-centered course in which classes meet four days a week for a total of 12 (in-class) instructional hours, in addition to weekly conferences with the teacher. A student who for any reason misses more than the number of hours specified in the ENGL 0210 attendance policy will be dropped from the course. A student who is dropped will be allowed to retake the course the following semester. Sessions are devoted to the comprehension and summary of university-level texts, the introduction to basic research tools, the writing of essays on science and humanities topics and remedial grammar, within the context of individual teacher-student conferences. Students taking ENGL 0210 may enroll in no more than two academic courses with a maximum of 7 academic course credits. Any student who withdraws from ENGL 0210 must also withdraw from the two other academic courses.

    For new students, placement in Academic English for the Liberal Arts is determined by their score on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-Based Test (TOEFL-iBT) For students enrolled in the intensive English program, placement in Academic English for the Liberal Arts is determined by their scores on the IEP exit test. All students who have been admitted into ENGL 0210 must satisfactorily complete the course work within a time period not to exceed two full semesters and a summer session. Students taking ENGL 0210 in summer may not enroll in any other academic course.

  
  • ENGL 123/0310 - Effective Writing (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  • ENGL 124/0311 - Academic Reading (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  • ENGL 125/0312 - Listening and Speaking (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  • ENGL 199/0399 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students as part of the Primary Level Core.

    Notes
    May be taken concurrently with   .

English & Comparative Literature

  
  • ECLT 123/1023 - Experiencing Creativity: Texts and Images (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces short literary works juxtaposed to texts and visual material from different fields of knowledge in order to train students to read, differentiate, and interpret texts and images.

  
  • ECLT 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    A course that addresses broad intellectual concerns and is accessible to students from any major or class level. The course is offered as part of the Freshman Level of the Core Curriculum.

  
  • ECLT 200/2010 - Introduction to Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    For students interested in literature but not necessarily intending to major in the field, this course will enable the student to acquire the tools and learn the methods which would help him/her understand poetry, fiction and drama and develop a deeper appreciation of great literary texts from various places and times.

  
  • ECLT 201/2011 - Survey of British Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces students to a selection of major works in British Literature from its beginnings to the present.  It instructs students to analyze and interpret influential novels, plays, poems, and essays.  The course presents the development of British literature historically while emphasizing the cultural and aesthetic dimensions of the texts.

  
  • ECLT 202/2012 - Global English Literatures (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course explores modern literature written in English by native and non-native speakers (African, Arab, American, British, European, Indian, and Asian writers). This course emphasizes the stylistic analysis, theoretical examination, and historical context of shorter texts to develop an appreciation for the globalization of English-language literary production, and for the role of postcolonial writers.

  
  • ECLT 209/2019 - Introduction to American Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to key events and texts in the history and culture of the United States. Using films, literature and historical texts, the course will examine American culture within a historical context.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 299/2096 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Global Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  • ECLT 299/2097 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Arab World Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

  
  • ECLT 299/2099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Humanities (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major. 

  
  • ECLT 301/3001 - Medieval Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces the student to the literary culture and counter-culture of the Middle Ages through reading selected autobiographical and fictional texts from St. Augustine, Abelard, Heloise, Dante, Chaucer, Attar and The Arabian Nights.

  
  • ECLT 302/3002 - Literature of the Renaissance (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of Renaissance authors, beginning with Petrarch and the origins of the Renaissance in Italy. The course traces this cultural revolution as it spread from Italy to other parts of the European continent and finally to Tudor England.

  
  • ECLT 303/3003 - Seventeenth-Century Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The literary developments that followed the Renaissance are explored, culminating in discussion of John Milton and his epic masterpiece, Paradise Lost.

  
  • ECLT 304/3004 - Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Dominant modes in European literature and thought between 1660 and 1760.
    Works not originally written in English will be read in English translations.

  
  • ECLT 305/3005 - Romanticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major European and American ideas and literary works of the period 1760-1848.
    Works not originally written in English will be read in English translations.

  
  • ECLT 306/3006 - Nineteenth-Century European Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major European works of fiction, poetry and drama from the period between 1789-1914.
    Works not originally written in English will be read in English translations.

  
  • ECLT 308/3008 - Modern European and American Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Selected readings of American and European authors representing literary trends from 1900 to the present

  
  • ECLT 310/3010 - American Literature to 1900 (3 cr.)



    Description
    Selected readings of literary works beginning with pre-Columbian oral traditions and moving from the colonial era to the early national period through to the late nineteenth century.

    Cross-listed
    Same as .
  
  • ECLT 311/3011 - Modern American Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Works of twentieth-century American writers. The reading list may be chosen to reflect changing ethnic and cultural phenomena and will vary from year to year.

    Cross-listed
    Same as .
  
  • ECLT 344/3014 - Literature and Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course concentrates on the intersection of the literary mode with the philosophical quest in Eastern and Western writing. Students are trained to analyze philosophical myths, tales, poems and dialogues as well as grasp the symbolic structures and expository techniques of philosophers.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   
    When Offered
    Offered in Spring.
  
  • ECLT 330/3030 - Literature and Cinema (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course investigates the relationship between literature and cinema and how they complement each other in representing textually and visually a broad theme, a historical period, or a national concern.

    Cross-listed
    FILM 3030  
  
  • ECLT 332/3032 - World Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course covers seminal literary works in both Western and non-Western canons, assigned in editions of excellent English translations.

  
  • ECLT 333/3033 - African Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course concentrates on modern literature of the African continent with special emphasis on sub-Saharan literary works, including their correspondence to North African literature. Texts by prominent writers from Africa (men and women/ black and white) will be analyzed in relation to the indigenous culture and oral creativity, as well as in relation to the colonial and post-colonial experience.

  
  • ECLT 345/3045 - Literature and Gender (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course investigates gender roles in literary texts and the image of women in different historical periods and cultural settings. Readings include Feminist and anti-Feminist literary and theoretical texts drawn from the North and the South.

  
  • ECLT 346/3046 - Third World Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course analyzes Third World literary texts from Asia, Africa and South America in their historical context and their contribution to post-colonial discourse.

  
  • ECLT 348/3048 - Contemporary Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course explores literary texts which marked the period following World War II as well as very recent European and American works in a comparative context.

  
  • ECLT 352/3052 - Recurrent Themes in Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course revolves around a selected literary theme (such as Romance, Friendship, or Loss among others), recurring in different cultures and regions of the world or/and recurring through the ages.  The literary theme might be in one genre (drama, fiction, or poetry) or in a combination of genres.

  
  • ECLT 353/3053 - Modern Drama (3 cr.)



    Description
    A study of mainly European drama in the period from Ibsen to the present, including plays by Shaw, Chekhov, Strindberg, Pirandello, Brecht, Sartre, Beckett, Pinter and others, and dealing with related developments in theatre, cultures and society.

  
  • ECLT 360/3060 - Shakespeare (3 cr.)



    Description
    Analysis of Shakespearean drama, including tragedy, comedy, history and romance. The course begins with an examination of the theatrical and historical content in which Shakespeare lived and wrote. It then focuses on individual plays, paying attention to the details of Shakespearean language, as well as to the broader issues of power, politics and gender.

  
  • ECLT 370/3070 - Creative Writing (3 cr.)



    Description
    A course on literary writing designed to accommodate the needs of diverse students.  Emphasis is on developing one’s own story-telling, play-writing, and/or poetic skills by studying the craft of influential authors from different regions and traditions.  The students will meet and interact with Cairo-based emerging and established creative writers as part of their course work.

  
  • ECLT 347/3099 - Selected Topics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examination of specific topics in genre and other areas of special interest and expertise of the faculty. May be repeated for credit if content changes. In recent years, the following have been offered under this heading: The Arabian Nights, The Lyrical Mode (in English, Arabic and French), Autobiographies, Literature and Cultural History, Literature and the Visual Arts, Literature and Urban Culture, Theory of Narrative, The European Novel, Figures of the Scared, T. S. Eliot, The Bloomsbury Group and Albert Camus.

  
  • ECLT 000/4000 - Independent Study and Readings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of department.

    Description
    Guided readings in selected topics in English and Comparative Literature.

  
  • ECLT 409/4009 - Greek Classics in Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major works of Greek literature since 700 B.C., chosen on the basis of merit and influence and studied in the most artistic translations.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 410/4010 - Classics of the Ancient World (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major works in ancient Near Eastern and Latin literatures studied in the most artistic translations.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 411/4011 - History of Literary Criticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    Study of central documents in the tradition of Western literary criticism, from Plato to the Romantics.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 412/4012 - Modern Literary Criticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    Analysis of the major trends in modern literary theory, such as Russian formalism, new criticism and post-structuralism.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 447/4099 - Capstone Seminar: Selected Topics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examination of specific themes and other topics of special interest. This coure is designed to meet the requirements of a capstone seminar for the core curriculm. May be repeated for credit if content changes.

  
  • ECLT 000/5101 - Visual, Literary, and Critical Approaches to Gender in MENA (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course immerses students in the literary, historical, and theoretical debates within the academic fields of Middle East gender and women’s studies. Interdisciplinary approaches as well as varieties of theoretical positions and visual representations are discussed critically. Acknowledging the entanglements of regions, scholarly debates and political struggles, this course locates the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) within its worldly context.

    Cross-listed
    GWST 5101  
    When Offered
    Offered yearly.
    Repeatable
    Not repeatable
  
  • ECLT 506/5106 - Greek Classics in Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major works of Greek literature since 700 B.C., chosen on the basis of merit and influence and studied in the most artistic translations.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 507/5107 - Classics of the Ancient World (3 cr.)



    Description
    Major works in ancient Near Eastern and Latin literatures studied in the most artistic translations.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 508/5108 - History of Literary Criticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    Study of central documents in the history of literary criticism, from Plato to the Romantics.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 509/5109 - Modern Literary Criticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    Analysis of the major trends in modern literary theory, such as Russian formalism, new criticism and post-structuralism.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • ECLT 510/5110 - Renaissance Writers (3 cr.)



    Description
    Detailed study of the works of selected British or European writers from Petrarch to Shakespeare.

  
  • ECLT 512/5112 - Seventeenth-Century Writers (3 cr.)



    Description
    Detailed study of the works of selected seventeenth-century European and British writers.

  
  • ECLT 514/5114 - Eighteenth-Century Writers (3 cr.)



    Description
    Selected works of major eighteenth-century writers.

  
  • ECLT 516/5116 - The Romantic Movement (3 cr.)



    Description
    Selected critical problems in the Romantic movement..

  
  • ECLT 517/5117 - Nineteenth-Century Writers (3 cr.)



    Description
    Works of selected major nineteenth-century novelists and poets.

  
  • ECLT 523/5123 - Modern Poets (3 cr.)



    Description
    Readings and analyses of works of major British, European, and American poets from the beginnings of the Symbolist and Imagist movements to the present.

  
  • ECLT 531/5131 - The Modern Novel (3 cr.)



    Description
    Works of selected novelists of the twentieth century.

  
  • ECLT 540/5140 - Readings in American Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Guided reading.

  
  • ECLT 542/5142 - Readings in French Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Guided reading.

  
  • ECLT 543/5143 - Readings in British Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    Guided reading.

  
  • ECLT 545-546/5199-5299 - Selected Topics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Guided reading, research, and discussion. In recent years, the following courses have been offered under this heading: The Arabian Nights, The Lyrical Mode (in English, Arabic and French), Autobiographies, Literature and Cultural History, Literature and the Visual Arts, Literature and Urban Culture, Theory of Narrative, The European Novel, Figures of the Scared, T. S. Eliot, The Bloomsbury Group and Albert Camus.

    When Offered
    5199 offered in fall, 5299 in spring.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
  
  • ECLT 555/5255 - Research Methods in Literature (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces scholarship, debates, methods, and professional trends in the field of literary studies, considering questions of theory, application, interdisciplinary, and textuality. The goal of this course is to train students in the methods that they will use to conduct literary research in their papers and theses, giving careful attention to library resources and academic style.
     

  
  • ECLT 599/5298 - Research Guidance and Thesis (no cr.)




Entrepreneurship

  
  • ENTR 413/3102 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MGMT 3201  or BADM 2001  

    Description
    This is an interdisciplinary course combining skills from all areas of business. It focuses on the creation of new business ventures with an emphasis on personal rather than corporate goals. Special focus is placed on problems encountered by the entrepreneurs in the Middle East and development of solutions to those problems. The course also prepares students for intrapreneur or entrepreneur business careers in startups and small and large corporations. It offers and understanding of the stages of business formation and what activities are appropriate at each stage of business development to meet financial goals including preparations of feasibility studies for business start-ups.

  
  • ENTR 303/3201 - Principles of Entrepreneurial Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FINC 2101  

    Description
    This course teaches about financing of new entrepreneurial ventures. The course will examine both the entrepreneur’s and investor’s perspective with special emphasis on the venture capital process.
     

  
  • ENTR 417/4301 - Entrepreneurship Lab: Developing and Launching a New Venture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 3102  

    Description
    This course is specially intended for non-business students, minors in entrepreneurship, and students writing business plans for new ventures. It concentrates on the mechanics of constructing a creative, realistic and effective business plans for a new concept that the student team has generated and developed. Thus, it is intended as a “hands-on” experience that explores the process that a person must go through to put together a proper business plan for a start-up venture.
     

  
  • ENTR 418/4302 - Corporate Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 413/3102 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)  

    Description
    The course aims at understanding the DNA of entrepreneurial firms through answering the questions of what are the characteristics of renowned corporates, why there is a need for developing corporate venturing and how to construct the elements of an entrepreneurial ecosystem. The course will stress on the related issues to creating intrapreneurship through strategic, culture, human resources as well as other managerial functions. The course will also tackle strategies for sustaining competitive advantage within the business world.

  
  • ENTR 419/4303 - Social Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 3102  

    Description
    This course introduces students to the social entrepreneurship phenomenon is which combines the passion of a social mission with an image of business-like discipline, innovation, and determination. The course discusses how social entrepreneurial practices blur the traditional lines between nonprofit enterprise, government and private sector contributes to the generation of a unique set of opportunities and challenges that characterize this new landscape of entrepreneurship.

  
  • ENTR 420/4501 - Family Business (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 413/3102 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)  

    Description
    This course will examine the causes and consequences of the creation of family fortunes, with a focus on the practical implications for family decision-making and how to create an institutional organization. The course will address challenges facing the family business with an insight on the succession planning and governance. The course will present several case studies of successful family business as well as failures with a stress on the cultural aspects associated with the local Egyptian one. The course also discusses the organizational behavior issues related to family businesses and what are their impacts on the business sustainability.

  
  • ENTR 421/4502 - Innovation and Technology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 413/3102 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)  

    Description
    The course is designed for business students; in a quest to understand the role of innovation and technology in entrepreneurial organizations as well as in society. The course will cover the different types of innovation in an organization with a special focus on business model innovation. The concept of technology will be addressed through understanding the fundamentals of product/service and process innovation as well as technology management in prominent organizations. Also the concept of intellectual property rights management and protection as well as new product/service development will be covered as contemporary concepts affecting the organizational effectiveness.

  
  • ENTR 000/4503 - Digital Strategy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 3102  

    Description
    This course focuses on the key skills, tools, methods, needed for creating effective digital innovations and building digital platforms that will boost customer acquisition and engagement and the diverse business models for sustaining these platforms. The course will deliberately expose the students to a large number of digital tools and tactics with the aim of addressing digital strategy from a 360 degree view analyzing and improving the design and content of every touch point of your digital platforms.

  
  • ENTR 470/4970 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of Instructor.

    Description
    Considers selected topics of current relevance in Entrepreneurship.

    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree.
  
  • ENTR 000/5201 - Entrepreneurship and Regional Opportunities (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is the first of two project-based courses that will focus on Entrepreneurial start-ups and Family Businesses in the MBA. It follows an experiential based learning pedagogy which allows students to explore different opportunities in the MENA and Africa markets that might lead to the creation of a business venture. Throughout this course students will scan regional prospects, create and evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, assess resources, test markets, and form teams driven by creativity and leadership that will lead to development of the first stage of an entrepreneurial venture.

    In coordination with AUC Venture Lab, students will develop and practice conducting an entrepreneurial pitch, develop a business model to your proposed venture and go through the experience of assessing the feasibility, and the business model of that venture. Students will explore and discover the different ideas and pivot during that stage in an attempt to improve the viability of their proposed venture.

    Some of the activities students will be doing in the course:

    1. Assess your personal entrepreneurial capacity
    2. Differentiate between ideas and opportunities
    3. Differentiate between entrepreneurial and management thinking
    4. Scan regional opportunities and evaluate regional start-ups
    5. Experiment with idea generation techniques to help create, develop and assess your ideas
    6. Formulate a business concept, pitch it, defend it, and determine its feasibility
    7. Learn to pivot, modify your business idea as you gain more insights and market information


  
  • ENTR 000/5202 - Developing an Entrepreneurial Venture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENTR 5201  

    Description
    This is the second of two project-based courses that will focus on Entrepreneurial start-ups and Family Businesses in the MBA. It builds on the concepts and skills developed in the first project-based course. It is based on experiential learning with the objective of exposing the students to actual experimentation with their start-up business.

    Students will take the business concept, idea and model that was developed in the pre-requisite course and continue the entrepreneurship journey by establishing an enterprise that will strive to achieve profit and gain first steps towards sustainability.

    During this course, students will go through three cycles of reflection on their entrepreneurial venture:

    1. Introducing their products/services to the customers and gain first-hand knowledge on the reaction of the market. This includes meeting customers outside the class, pitching their value proposition, and negotiating with customers.
    2. Soliciting resources from suppliers/partners, conducting negotiations, quality control and ensuring delivery.
    3. Assessing their products, pricing, promotion, and people utilized in the process.


    After each phase Students will have an opportunity to pivot by changing their business model as a result of their evaluation of the previous phase and experience.

  
  • ENTR 000/5211 - Developing an Entrepreneurial Mindset (1.5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Co-requisite: ACCT 5211  

    Description
    This course will address entrepreneurship concepts as a prevailing phenomenon that is contributing to the economies of nations, and at the same time enhancing the well being of the human race. The concepts covered includes; innovation, value proposition, business models, resource allocation, competitive advantage, business strategies, lean startups. The course is mainly case oriented where students will relate the different concepts through the analysis of Egyptian as well as international cases. An interactive learning pedagogy will be adopted throughout the course, where discussions, debates, and role playing will be the main tools used. On the other hand, experiential learning will be enhanced through discussions with guest speakers’ entrepreneurs’ who can share their knowledge with the students.


Environmental Engineering

  
  • ENVE 561/5250 - Water Quality Control (3 cr.)



    Description
    Water quality parameters: standards and analysis; theory and basic processes for modeling fate and transport of pollutants in surface water bodies; integrated water pollution control strategies.

  
  • ENVE 562/5251 - Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Theory and design of unit operations and processes in environmental engineering, emphasizing water and wastewater treatment; namely: physical, chemical and biological unit processes, sludge handling processes.   

    Cross-listed
    Same as   but with additional requirements for graduate students.
  
  • ENVE 564/5252 - Air Pollution Control Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Air pollutants sources, sinks, and residence time. Costs of air pollution. Control strategies and systems design. Mathematical models of air pollution. Monitoring and control instruments.

  
  • ENVE 566/5254 - Solid and Hazardous Wastes Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid wastes - Nature, generation and collection.  Local and regional management strategies including recycling and recovery of useful products, landfilling, and incineration.  Hazardous wastes - Nature, generation and collection.  Risk assessment.  Management strategies including source reduction, treatment, recovery, landfilling, and incineration. 

    Cross-listed
    Same as   but with additional requirements for graduate students.

    Same as

      .

  
  • ENVE 567/5255 - Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    Chemical principles for quantitative solution of environmental engineering problems with a focus on aqueous systems. Concept of chemical equilibrium is developed to determine mass distribution of environmentally significant substances. Applications of acid-base, coordination, oxidation-reduction, and organic distribution reactions are developed for water and wastewater systems.

  
  • ENVE 569/5258 - Groundwater Hydrology and Contamination (3 cr.)



    Description
    Groundwater and well hydraulics with applications to water supply and control of contaminants; groundwater contamination; development, solution and application of contaminant transport equations; groundwater remediation; introduction to unsaturated flow.

  
  • ENVE 580/5910 - Independent Study in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

    Notes
    (Students may sign for up to 3 credits towards fulfilling M. Sc. requirements).
  
  • ENVE 592/5930 - Advanced Topics in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    Topics to be chosen every year according to specific interests.

    Repeatable
    May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.
  
  • ENVE 599/5980 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENGR 5940  

    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis.

    Repeatable
    Must be taken twice for credit.
  
  • ENVE 662/6250 - Advanced Treatment Processes (3 cr.)



    Description
    Description, design, and applications of advanced technologies for removal of contaminants from environmental media; membrane technologies - nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, membrane bioreactors; adsorption; biological activated carbon; biofilters; pulsators; tube settlers; advanced oxidation processes - ozonation, UV radiation, photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation and reduction; cryogenic and thermal processes.
     

  
  • ENVE 680/6910 - Independent Study in Environmental Engineering (3 cr. Max.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of environmental engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.
     

  
  • ENVE 692/6930 - Advanced Selected Topics in Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.
     

  
  • ENVE 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.
     


Executive Business Administration

  
  • EMBA 601/5601 - Leading and Navigating Strategic Change (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on planning, implementing and managing change in a fast-changing dynamic environment of today. It assists executives to understand challenges, tools, and burdens associated with initializing and implementing major changes in the organization. It addresses change efforts, reconstructing and reengineering and organizational adaptation decisions and developing action plans for making smooth transformation process and preventing resistance to change from employees and providing effective leadership of people in the organization.
     

  
  • EMBA 603/5603 - Data Analysis and Analytical Decision Modeling for Optimizing Decisions (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on exploring the use of sample data, survey, regression analysis, decision models and statistical methods for estimating, predicting, and forecasting and making business decision. It will also include applications to total quality management, polling, employee attitude surveys, market research, operation and finance. It improves participants modeling skills, which are the key to success. Participants learn about weaknesses and strengths of quantitative models. It provides them with a reality check on the forecasts, enables ‘what if’ analysis and provides an integrated view of business, and is a key step in valuation.
     

  
  • EMBA 604/5604 - Managerial Economics (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module covers the basics of microeconomics (supply, demand, market price and output, production, cost and market equilibrium) and the international macroeconomics and monetary environment within which business operate. It provides intensive overview of economic analysis of firms, industries, markets, forms of competition, role of industry structure, the influence of government policies. It provides framework that participants use to understand the performance of international economies and financial markets, linkage among countries through trade, exchange rates and the balance of payment, business cycles and rescissions, inflation and deflation, and the effects of the governments’ macroeconomic policies.
     

  
  • EMBA 605/5605 - Strategic Accounting (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module addresses corporate financial reports as an important means of communication with investors and with managers in making tactical and strategic decisions. It focuses on the development, analysis and use of these reports and what assumptions and concepts accountants use to prepare them, and why they use those assumptions and concepts. It introduces basic costs concepts and develops techniques such as cost drivers, activity-based accounting, customer profitability, value-add and values chain analysis, and target costing. Other topics may include mergers and acquisitions, purchase and pooling, free cash flow and financial statement analysis, studies the nature, design and decision-facilitating role of cost systems and focuses on the effects of strategy, technology and the environment on cost system designs. Tools such as budgets, variance analysis, benchmarking, transfer pricing and balanced scorecard are used to illustrate planning, control and performance measurement systems that facilitate successful implementation of organization’s strategies
     

  
  • EMBA 606/5606 - Financial Management (2 cr.)



    Description
    It introduces the basic principles of finance. It addresses topics as discounting techniques and applications, evaluation of capital expenditure, estimating cost of capital, bond and stock valuation and investment decisions under uncertainty. Participants are expected by the end of this module to apply basic valuation formulas to standard financial instruments.
     

  
  • EMBA 607/5607 - Corporate Financial Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It analysis corporate financial decisions. It introduces the structure of markets, the evaluation of assets and concepts of risk-adjusted returns. It addresses essential topics as market efficiency, capital structure, dividend and stock repurchase policy, and firms’ use of options and convertible securities. By the end of this module, participants should be able to understand the underlying analytical framework for corporate finance.
     

  
  • EMBA 608/5608 - Talent Management, Coaching & Mentoring (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The act of management is all about amplifying the human capability of an organization. This module addresses the people side of business from a general management perspective. Within the context of newer thinking in “Talent management and Organizational Performance”, the module integrates concepts from strategy, organizational behavior, talent management, motivation, incentives, empowerment, leadership, organizational design, and transformation. It assist the participants in developing a deeper understanding of how human capability (talent) can be amplified or dampened by the enabling or disabling attributes of the intangible assets of a company (structure, leadership, culture, information, networks, beliefs, values, and reward systems); and it equips the participants with management practices, approaches and coaching and mentoring skills, that can be employed to optimize the various inter-related levers of talent and organizational performance.
     

  
  • EMBA 609/5609 - Managerial Decision Making and Operation Management (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module introduces operation from the general managers’ point of view rather than operation specialist. It approaches the integration, efficiency and effectiveness of managerial functions in support of development of the organization’s strategic goals, improving business decisions and achieving competitive advantage. It discusses operating systems: production process, process design and flow analysis, inventory concepts and models, time-to-market and responsiveness, project management, effects of uncertainty and waiting lines in producing an organization’s products and services. It focuses on quality management and statistical quality controls, as well as recent process-improvement ideas. Case studies are used to highlight central issues.
     

  
  • EMBA 610/5610 - Global Marketing Management (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module examines strategies over the product lifecycle including growth strategies for mature and declining markets, and defensive strategies. It addresses the importance of companies being market-driven and customer focused and presents current theories and practices of marketing management. Participants will be able to have an integrative strategic view of marketing, including the impact of globalization, information technologies and challenges to implement them.
     

  
  • EMBA 611/5611 - Competitive & Corporate Strategy (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    Corporate Strategy focuses on business policy by a firm and the development and implementation of a business strategy that will allow the firm to achieve its goals and objectives. Achieving these goals and objectives usually occurs within a competitive context, in which other rival organizations seek similar if not the same ends (e.g. market share, profits, control of scarce resources, etc.). How a firm stands against its rivals’ attempts and how it develops and implements a competitive strategy. Topics include industry analysis and competitive advantage as it derives from the firm’s strategic investments, resources allocation, and organizational coalitions.
     

  
  • EMBA 612/5612 - E- Business & Managers’ Toolkit (2 cr.)



    Description
    The module examines application of information resources and technology in organizations. The objective is to familiarize participants with key concepts in the use and management of Information Technology (IT). Topics covered include selected aspects of hardware, software, organizing data and information, telecommunication, electronic commerce, transaction processing systems, decision support systems, business intelligence systems and systems development. Participants will learn how do information technologies create value and affect the structure of competition.
     

  
  • EMBA 613/5613 - Leadership & Team Building (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The leadership module moves participants to a deeper understanding of their leadership competencies and personality style through personal analysis and assessments.  Participants will be able to integrate managerial skills and effective concepts of leadership (Traits, Competencies and Ethics) of the work place. They will learn how to understand to better coach others when in leadership role and how to flex their styles as needed to lead others more effectively. They will be able to refine and update their personal development goals, as needed in response to circumstances on the job and further feedback in providing leadership solutions. The module also focuses on team building and effective strategies for better group decision making, team leadership, resolving conflict within and across teams, evaluating and rewarding teams’ performance and developing a team-focused organizational culture.

  
  • EMBA 614/5614 - Innovation and Creating the Best Practices of Tomorrow (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It explores a broader, more inclusive view of innovation, enabling the manager to employ innovation as a more effective competitive weapon, leading to an understanding of state-of-the-art “Innovation Process Management” within and between firms and across geographies. It addresses how to make creative energy the goal of the organization and energizes the staff to be creative and see problems not as obstacles but as opportunities for innovation.
     

 

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