Feb 26, 2024  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

History

  
  • HIST 204/2402 - Europe from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (1337-1789) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the history of Europe from the start of the Hundred Years War to the French Revolution. It examines the major developments of European politics, society and culture as it moved from the late Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period (including the Renaissance and the Age of Enlightenment) to the beginning of the Age of Revolution.




  
  • HIST 205/2403 - Europe in the Age of Revolution and Reform (1789-1914) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Course explores Europe’s so-called “Long 19th century” from the French Revolution to World War I including many of the phenomena that came to define the century such as capitalism, nationalism, socialism, feminism and imperialism.

     

  
  • HIST 206/2404 - Europe in International Politics in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Course explores major development in European and international socio-economic politics from the end of the 1800s to the present day. It introduces the key events and trends of this tumultuous century including wars, revolutions, and ideological movements.

     

  
  • HIST 201/2501 - History of American Civilization to the Nineteenth Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of American cultural roots from the period of exploration through the foundation of a federal American republic, social and industrial challenges, the question of slavery, and the crisis of civil war.

  
  • HIST 202/2502 - History of Modern American Civilization (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of events leading to the creation of a distinct American culture as the United States meets the challenges of moral crisis, the industrial revolution, and world leadership from the nineteenth century to the present.

  
  • HIST 210/2602 - Religions of the World (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the academic study of religion. By looking at the history, beliefs, practices, institutions and cultural expressions of a number of different religions, students will broaden their understanding of religions other than their own, and of the diversity of the human religious experience. Students will learn to appreciate the variety of religions in the world, and the similarities and differences between them.

  
  • HIST 212/2604 - The Quest for the Historical Jesus (3 cr.)



    Description
    Investigates the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth within the context of Second Temple Judaism and Greco-Roman culture. Considers a range of pre-modern and modern interpretations of Jesus and the emergence of Christianity.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 243/2901 - History I: Pre-Dynastic Through Middle Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    The history of Pharaonic Egypt from predynastic times to the end of the Middle Kingdom will be covered. Literary sources will be augmented by archeological evidence

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Notes
    Field trips to archeological sites in the Cairo area are an obligatory aspect of the course.
  
  • HIST 244/2902 - History II: Middle Kingdom Through New Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of the instructor.

    Description
    The course will focus on the history of Pharaonic Egypt from the Middle Kingdom to the decline of the New Kingdom and will examine the texts, monuments and artifacts that underline our understanding of this era.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    Field trips to the Cairo Museum and other relevant sites are a required part of the course.
  
  • HIST 320/3105 - Big History (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    The course will not be open to students who have already taken   .

    Description
    A study of the earth, the universe and human civilizations that tries to understand how human beings are connected to their environments and the billions of years of historical evolution that preceded their appearance on the planet. Beginning with big bang cosmology and continuing all the way through to the future, it is an attempt to put everything - and everyone - into perspective.

  
  • HIST 319/3205 - Islamic Spain and North Africa (711-1492 A.D.) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Muslim Spain and North Africa. Its emphasis is on explaining how interactions among different ethnic groups (Arabs, Berbers, and Iberian natives) and different confessional communities (Jews, Christians, and Muslims) created social situations that made the Western Muslim lands unique in Islamic history.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 330/3206 - Urban Landscapes in the Modern Middle East/North Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents diverse histories of cities in the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the impact of French and British colonialism to Arab nationalism. It introduces students to central themes in modern urban history with emphasis on the city and the production of modern lives, rural migration and the transformation of the city, women and men in the city, and urban crisis and social movements.

  
  • HIST 331/3207 - History of Palestine/Israel (3 cr.)



    Description
    This survey course covers the history of modern Palestine and Israel. It is based on a comparative approach that allows students to engage with primary materials, secondary historical texts, literary narratives, and cinematic representations. This course provides students with the historical and theoretical tools to learn about and engage formations of nation and history in Palestine/Israel.

  
  • HIST 333/3208 - Zionism and Modern Judaism (3 cr.)



    Description
    The Zionist ideology and movement in its own terms, and in the context of modern Judaism. The course places Zionism in its historical and religious contexts, and examines its varieties. The Zionist movement is followed from its origins to the establishment of Israel. Related aspects of Israeli politics are then examined, with especial reference to ideological and religious debates.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 343/3210 - Birth of Muslim Community and Rise of the Arab Caliphates (3 cr.)



    Description
    The rise of Islam and Arab expansion, the classical period of Islamic civilization during its first centuries to the period of Abbasid political disintegration.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  • HIST 344/3211 - Caliphs and Sultans in the Age of Crusades and Mongols (3 cr.)



    Description
    The later Abbasid caliphate, the rise of Shi’ism and the Fatimids, Sunni consolidation under the Seljuks and Ayyubids, external threats to dar al-Islam; the rise of Mamluks .

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  • HIST 345/3212 - Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids and Mughols (3 cr.)



    Description
    The decline of the Mamluks; the Timurids in Persia; the age of gunpowder: the Safavid Ottoman, and Moghul empires and their decline.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  • HIST 355/3213 - State and Society in the Middle East, 1699-1914 (3 cr.)



    Description
    The Ottoman Empire and Iran: continuities and transformations. Imperial administration and relations with Europe. Challenges to the premodern order: regional and global economies; social and cultural trends

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 356/3214 - State and Society in the Middle East, 1906-present (3 cr.)



    Description
    Beginning with the Young Turk and Iran’s Constitutional revolutions, this course follows the fate of Middle Eastern societies and states during the twentieth century, with a special focus on colonialism and nationalism; independence movements and decolonization; the Arab-Israeli conflict; society, politics, and culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 000/3215 - Zawiyas, Harems, Coffee shops, Everyday Life in the Pre-Modern Mideast (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examination of major trends in social and cultural trends, movements, and institutions in the medieval and early modern Middle East. Includes the interpretation of cultural identity, the transmission of knowledge and culture, the construction of social status, and the integration or marginalization of specific social groups in family, social and state structures.

    Cross-listed
    Same as ARIC 3321  
  
  • HIST 000/3216 - Shi’i Muslims in History (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course focuses on the historical roles of Shi’i Muslims from the seventh century to the present. The aim of the course is to familiarize the student with the major Shi’i discourses as they evolved in specific historical contexts. While emphasis will be on the historical development of Twelver Shi’ism, other important groups such as the Ismai’liyya and the Zaydiyya will also receive due consideration.

    Cross-listed
    same as ARIC 3337  
  
  • HIST 357/3288 - Selected topics in Middle East History (3 cr.)



    Description
    Focuses on theme or topic in the history of the Middle East. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  • HIST 350/3302 - Violence, War, and Conflict in Modern Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore the complexities of violent conflicts on the African continent in the past 125 years. As violence, conflicts and wars seem to be crucial elements of Africa’s modern history; students will for example investigate if this means that Africans are inherently more violent than the rest of the world - or if such an assumption only disguises the complex historical roots of war and conflicts? Moreover, students will also discover that Africans have historically resisted violence and oppression just as often as they have promoted it. Students can expect to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary material and will be introduced to different African regions to get a deeper understanding of contexts of violence in Africa’s past and present. By the end of the course students will be able to critically analyze common narratives about “the violent continent” reproduced by mass media.
     

  
  • HIST 307/3405 - The Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation (3 cr.)



    Description
    An investigation of the development of European culture in the High Middle Ages and an examination of the ways in which European society was transformed by the intellectual and religious movements known as the Renaissance and the Reformation.

  
  • HIST 308/3406 - Europe in the Age of Reason (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the ways in which European intellectual developments during the Enlightenment were connected with socio-political changes in the seventeenth, eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

  
  • HIST 342/3903 - History of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Era (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    This course will study the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD. It will also examine the social consequences of the spread of Christianity in Egypt and the rise of Coptic culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  • HIST 346/3904 - Societies and Cultures of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent

    Description
    The course constitutes a historical overview of the societies and cultures of Egypt, the Mediterranean World and the Middle East, from the emergence of urban society in Iraq in the fourth millennium BCE to the rise and fall of the great empires of Babylon, Assyria, the Hitties, Archaemenid Persia, Greece and Rome. Special attention will be paid to the position of Ancient Egyptian civilization within the wider context of Ancient Near Eastern History.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  • HIST 000/4000 - Honors Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    HIST 4801  and HIST 4802  

    Description
    The course is part of a three-semester sequence, with the Honors section of HIST 4801 forming the first part of the sequence and HIST 4802 forming the second part. This course provides students enrolled in the department’s Honors Program the opportunity to conduct original historical research, write a scholarly article under faculty supervision, and either submit the article for publication or make a public presentation of it at the annual EURECA conference. Preliminary work on the project will begin in HIST 4802 and will be completed in HIST 4000. Grading is P/F

  
  • HIST 425/4106 - Food in World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    An inter-disciplinary examination of the role of food in human history beginning with the agricultural revolution and including such topics as the Columbian exchange, industrialization, the rise of the restaurant, food as cultural identity, food policy and the state, fast food, gender roles, health and nutrition, and the emergence of modern attitudes towards food and the body.


     

  
  • HIST 430/4107 - The Environment in World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the relationship between humans and the environment from the Agricultural Revolution (c. 10,000 BCE) to the present with an emphasis on the Industrial Revolution and the modern world.

  
  • HIST 405/4188 - Selected Topics in World History (3 cr.)



    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 415/4215 - The Marriage Crisis and the Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines how men and women imagine their nations through marriage and understand their rights and duties in the twentieth-century Middle East. It shows how marriage is a lens that reflects and critiques larger socioeconomic and political issues. It also contributes to our historical understanding of the “marriage crisis”, which continues to dominate public debates today.

  
  • HIST 435/4216 - Social and Political History of Modern Cairo (3 cr.)



    Description
    The History of Cairo with an emphasis on social, political and economic developments in the twentieth century.

  
  • HIST 440/4217 - Colonialism and Imperialism in the Middle East and South Asia (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course deals with the history of colonialism and imperialism in the Middle East and South Asia. Its basic premise is that the colonial encounter was a formative one for both colonizer and colonized. We will be studying not only the political and military aspects of that encounter, but also its ideological and cultural ones. Topics touched upon include: Orientalism, imperialism and culture, medicine, law, urban planning, and gender.

  
  • HIST 454/4219 - Modern Movements in Islam (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or    or equivalent background.

    Description
    Trends of thought and activism that developed throughout the Muslim world from the eighteenth century onward and identified themselves as Islamic. This course looks at intellectual roots, affiliations, and differences. It investigates modernity, reform, statehood, and social change as addressed by state and non-state actors, in theory and in practice.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  • HIST 460/4220 - Selected Topics in Middle Eastern History, 600-1250 A. D. (3 cr.)



    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 463/4221 - Selected Topics in the History of Islamic Thought and Institutions (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 000/4222 - Egypt under Nasser (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    (1) Working Knowledge of colloquial Arabic

    (2) Junior standing in any field

    Description
    This course examines the Nasserite historical experience: its historiography, primary documents, legacy, milestone events, institutional frameworks, and trajectory-all within the regional and global contexts of that period.

  
  • HIST 000/4224 - Egypt in the Modern World Market (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the processes initiated with Egypt’s integration in the modern world market in the early nineteenth century. The course uses a general social history approach and places the examined processes in their regional and global contexts.

  
  • HIST 462/4288 - Selected Topics in the History of the Modern Middle East (3 cr.)



    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 461/4289 - Selected Topics in Middle Eastern History, 1250-1800 A. D. (3 cr.)



    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 412/4290 - Selected Topics in Modern Egyptian History (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics to be chosen according to specific interest, such as: the making of the modern Egyptian nation; cities, towns and villages in modern Egyptian history; social and cultural history of modern Egypt.

    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 450/4303 - Global Capitalism and Africa: An Economic History (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this seminar students will explore the relationship between the rise of capitalism and the integration of Sub-Saharan Africa’s labor and natural resources into the global economy in the nineteenth and twentieth century. We will be especially interested in two distinct but related issues: First, we want to explore the role of African labor, minerals, and agricultural products for the economic growth of the Global North. Second, we want to examine how oversea markets and foreign influences shaped local economies and “working lives” in different regions in Africa, and explore how Africans confronted these changes.
     

  
  • HIST 400/4400 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Description
    In exceptional circumstances, students may, with department approval, arrange to study beyond the regular course offerings. Open only to juniors and seniors with a minimum B average. May be repeated for credit if content changes.

  
  • HIST 402/4488 - Selected Topics in European History (3 cr.)



    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes
  
  • HIST 401/4588 - Selected Topics in the History of the United States (3 cr.)



    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  • HIST 420/4801 - Historical Theory and Methodology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: To be taken in senior year

    Description
    Seminar on historical thought from its emergence in the classical world to the present, including consideration of the Arab historical tradition. Covers schools of historical interpretation and methodological approaches. Major Capstone.

  
  • HIST 000/4802 - Preparation for Thesis Writting (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    HIST 4801  

    Description
    The course provides Honors students with an organized forum and timeline preparing, sharing, and
    honing the History Honors Thesis abstract and research proposal. This course is to be taken in the semester prior to the semester in which the actual research and writing of the Thesis are done.
    The Thesis is an article length (10,000 words) work of original scholarship ready to be submitted for publication and/or presented at AUC’s EURECA conference in the spring.

  
  • HIST 445/4905 - Selected Topics in Coptic Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course allows instructors to offer a topic in Coptic Studies. The topic will be chosen from year to year in coordination with the departments concerned and the dean of the School of HUSS, and according to the individual interests and areas of expertise of the instructors. Topics chosen may include various aspects of Coptic art and history, monasticism, folklore, or other subjects. The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  , ,   ,   .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall
    Notes
    Students in these majors may petition preferably before registration to have the course included in their major requirements.
  
  • HIST 542/5222 - Seminar on the Nineteenth-Century Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    Readings, discussion, and research.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • HIST 543/5223 - Seminar on the Twentieth-Century Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    Readings, discussion, and research.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .

Intensive English

  
  • ELIN 121/0302 - Advanced English (for Graduates) (0 cr.)




International Business

  
  • INTB 408/3501 - International Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The effect of the international financial environment on the major financial decisions of business. The international financial institution and their effect on firms operating in the international environment.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.
  
  • INTB 412/4601 - International Marketing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The marketing problems and opportunities of the exporter, licenser, or manufacturer in a foreign country. Topics include factors in assessing world marketing opportunities and the international market mix.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

International Human Rights Law

  
  • LAW 510/5210 - Introduction to International Human Rights Law and Critique (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to International Human Rights Law. As a gateway to the International Human Rights MA program, the course aims at providing participants with a forum to become acquainted with the basic conceptual underpinnings, institutional structures, and substantive complexity of international human rights.

  
  • LAW 511/5211 - International Humanitarian Law (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     ,   

    Description
    This course provides basic introduction to the field of international humanitarian law (IHL), otherwise known as the laws of war, the law or armed conflict, or jus in bello. It will consist in an overview of the existing substantive body of international law relating to the regulation of armed conflict, as well as an exploration of its internal structure and dynamics. It will discuss in a first part the relationship between humanitarian law and both general international law and international human rights Law, with regard to applicability implementation, and enforcement. In a second part, the course and materials will approach the “principle of distinction” and its implementation in the so-called “Geneva Law”, relating to protected persons, as well as the so-called “Hague Law”, relating to the means and methods of combat. Final sessions will discuss questions of implementation and criminal responsibility.

    When Offered
    This course is normally offered in the spring semester.
  
  • LAW 514/5214 - Human Rights in the Middle East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    . (Prerequisites can be waived by permission of the department).

    Description
    What does it mean to study human rights in the Middle East today? While exploring human rights violations in the Middle East might seem like a natural starting point, this course moves beyond that exercise. It aims at disrupting the traditional divisions and binaries of ‘economic and social rights’ versus ‘civil and political rights’. It engages with human rights as a series of intersectional moves that, together, fundamentally shape life in the Middle East. Additionally, the purpose of the course is not only to study structures of domination, such as authoritarianism, Islamism, patriarchy and neoliberalism, but also to engage with spaces of resistance and struggle. Whether it is the Arab revolutions, the recent protests in Iran, or the struggles of the Kurds across the region, the people of the Middle East have been engaging in different forms of resistance that fundamentally transformed the region over the course of the past decades. Normally offered in the spring semester

  
  • LAW 516/5216 - Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   . (Prerequisites can be waived by special permission of the Law department).

    Description
    Consideration of the historical development of the recognition of economic, social and cultural rights together with present convenants and other instruments operating at the international level. Specific rights such as the right to work, trade union rights, right to social security, right to adequate standards of living, health and education are considered as well as their philosophical underpinnings and social modalities.

    When Offered
    Normally offered only in the fall semester.
  
  • LAW 518/5218 - International Refugee Law (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   . (Prerequisites can be waived by special permission of the Law department).

    Description
    This course introduces the international refugee law regime and the background and historical context from which foundational concepts emerged. The bulk of the course is spent on the 1951 Refugee Convention and its Protocol, as well as the expanding mandate of UNHCR. The course considers some of the contradictions and dilemmas of international refugee law and takes into account developments in related areas of international human rights law, international humanitarian law and migration law. This course is required for all students seeking the MA or Diploma in Migration and Refugee Studies.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  • LAW 519/5219 - Human Rights in Africa (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    (Prerequisites may be waived by permission of the department)

    Description
    An overview of the contribution of the African continent to human rights law. The course will cover the specificities of Africa from the perspective of the development, interpretation, and enforcement of international human rights law from four perspectives: (1) the development and contributions of the African regional system of human rights, (2) the treatment of human rights issues in Africa by the universal system of human rights, (3) the place and application of human rights standards in selected African countries, and (4) the application of international humanitarian law in contemporary African conflict situations. As an advanced course dealing with the role of regional approaches and issues in the contemporary history of international human rights law, the substantive focus will be on the relevance of cultural and political specificity to human rights when seen from the perspective of the varied social contexts of the African continent. In light of the rich complexity of the African social, cultural and political background, some attention will be given to the particular situation of certain African States in the development of African human rights law, such as Egypt, Nigeria or South Africa. This course is offered at irregular intervals. Please contact the Department of Law for information about its availability.

  
  • LAW 575/5275 - Special Topics in International Human Rights Law (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Description
    Specialized areas of International Human Rights Law.

    Repeatable
    May be taken a second time for credit if content changes.
  
  • LAW 584/5284 - Human Rights in Practice (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    Internship for four to six months in an organization pursuing human rights activities, or active involvement on an institutional research project having a human rights emphasis. The work is assessed on the basis of a written report and discussion.
    This course is offered at irregular intervals. Please contact the Department of Law for information about its availability.


International Management

  
  • CEMS 000/5200 - Block Seminar (1.5 cr.)



    Description
    This is a 5-day seminar delivered before the start of term 1. The seminar, or part of it, could be held off campus (e.g. Cairo, Ain Sokhna, Hurgada, etc.) to capitalize on local attractions and touristic heritage of Egypt. Corporate partners would be involved in delivering speeches during the seminar.

    • The objective of this seminar is to introduce students to regional challenges that take place in Africa and the Middle East with including cultural specificities.
    • The seminar is based on blended learning with in-class sessions, guest speakers and a real life case solving and presentation by students.


  
  • CEMS 000/5201 - Global Strategy (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers an integrated perspective about the challenges associated with strategy design, implementation, and assessment within the international context. It addresses two central questions that top managers ought to answer: 1) What (international) businesses shall we get into and/or out of? And 2) How to compete? Considering both the firm’s unique characteristics and the structure of the markets where it competes. Through readings, case studies, a business strategy simulation, and interactive lectures, students are exposed to the latest techniques and methodologies for crafting corporate, business, and functional strategies meant to improve firms’ local and international competitiveness. Students will also be introduced to the relevant analytical techniques for diagnosing the competitive position of a business, and assessing alternative strategic directions in a global context. This course discusses topics related to global strategic management. Most students who join this program would have already taken an undergraduate strategy course. Accordingly, this course would not be discussing main stream strategy topics but rather topics related to global challenges in a dynamic global environment with special emphasis on the role played by technology and innovation in transforming the way global business is being conducted and strategies being formulated.

  
  • CEMS 000/5202 - Global Leadership (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Students admitted to the program are ones that would have already conducted at least 30 Cr of management education.

    Description
    This course focuses on current and critical issues in global management by examining the techniques and practices underpinning organizations across the globe. Through the lens of various functions of the organization and global management practices, decision-making processes will be unpacked including the impact these have on individuals, institutions and countries. This course will begin with reflective individual based assessments identifying individual traits, behavior and assumptions which will form the basis in understanding key ethical, social, cultural and cognitive factors affecting management practice and global organizations. Through a flipped classroom approach, students will be a central part to experiential and active learning, examining and reflecting on a range of management assumptions, communication and negotiation patterns and leadership styles that are integral to global management practice. This learning will be embedded and reinforced through the application of management concepts to ambiguous and complex business scenarios from international environments, preparing students for future international careers. As global citizens, students will explore and analyze key management theory and empirical evidence, and apply this to case studies and business scenarios, role play, group projects, individual assignments and reflections. By the end of this course, through a range of teaching and learning methods, students will develop a global managerial mindset through informed dialogue, educated and justified choices and decision making, negotiated teamwork and leadership skills that goes beyond traditional thinking.

  
  • CEMS 000/5203 - Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) Marketing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    For AUC Students : MKTG 2101  ; MKTG 3201  

    For non-AUC students :

    - A course in principles of Marketing
    - A course in Marketing Research

    Description
     Product, price, promotion and place: these are the four key areas in which marketing influences consumers. This innovative course takes the stance that poor consumers are distinctly disadvantaged in each of these areas. Documenting the imbalance of the exchange process by describing the business practice of those who market to poor consumers, issues related to basic necessities such as food, housing and transportation are addressed, as well as the consumption of `sin’ products by poor consumers. The problems faced by those who target low-income consumers are also examined, including the conflict between sound marketing practices and marginally ethical or unethical applications of those practices to this target customer group.

  
  • CEMS 000/5204 - Advanced Financial Management: Cases from the Middle East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    For AUC students : FINC 404/3201 - Investment Analysis (3 cr.)  
    For Non-AUC students : Introductory courses in basic concepts of Financial Management

    Description
    The main objective of this course is to analyze critical financial management issues faced by CFOs and investment bankers through practical case studies from the Middle East. Cases in Corporate Finance will focus on financing decisions, capital structure, advanced valuation methodologies including real options analysis as well as value based management. Cases in Investment Banking will tackle issuing related to corporate access to financial markets including public offerings, capital increases, convertible bonds, rights issues as well as trading and liquidity concerns for listed firms. Each topic will be covered using cases studies developed by the professor based on actual transactions he was involved in.

  
  • CEMS 000/5205 - Global Supply Chain Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    For AUC students: OPMG 401/4301 - Supply Chain Management (3 cr.)  
    For non-AUC students : An introductory course in Supply Chains at home university.

    Description
    This course focuses on the planning, processes, and activities of supply chain management for companies involved in international commerce. It discusses the basic theories of international trade, cultural differences in global supply chains, sustainability, risks, and security and the decision dilemmas related to outsourcing, offshoring and nearshoring. Students examine the end-to-end processes and operational challenges in managing global supply chains, such as, the basics of global trade, international transportation, duty, taxes, cultural differences, risks and security, and green supply chains issues. Please refer to program overview for a detailed description of the class sessions.

  
  • CEMS 000/5206 - Economics of Cultural Heritage (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will be covering a wide range of disciplines (such as Economics, culture, cultural heritage, consumer behavior, financial tools, accounting, marketing…) and related concepts and terminology. The course accompanies participants in a step by step approach to understand requirements of cultural heritage clients and projects, build a strategy phased out into clearly articulated tactics, plans and programs, develop the required organization that will deliver on the strategy put in place, develop cultural heritage products and services complete ecosystem and develop a business and financial model using different financial tools- to ensure the viability of the project.

  
  • CEMS 000/5210 - Business Communication Skills Seminar (0.5 cr.)



    Description
    This 1-day seminar is an introduction to modern business communication demonstrating ow effective communication can be achieved in organizations that are changing to meet new social, economic and technological demands. The subjects covered include:

    • Interpersonal communication, including the use and analysis of non-verbal communication
    • Group communication, including practical techniques to support discussion and meetings
    • Written presentation, including both paper and electronic documents
    • Oral presentation


  
  • CEMS 000/5220 - Global Citizenship Seminar (1 cr.)



    Description
    Highly publicized scandals and increased stakeholder activism for sustainable development have resulted in calls for more responsible global leadership. At the same time, emerging economies characterized by weak institutions, political instability, and a shaky rule of law have gained in importance for global business. The purpose of this 2-days seminar is to highlight the challenges that global leaders face in addressing the needs of diverse, cross-boundary stakeholders, with a particular focus on Western multinational enterprises (MNEs) doing business in emerging markets. The course will comprise guest lecturers from MNCs with special challenges given to students to work upon in teams to give suggested solutions. Moreover, the seminar will introduce students to traits and expectations from current Global leaders.

  
  • CEMS 000/5221 - Skill Seminar (0.5 cr.)



    Description
    These series of one-day seminars will be delivered by the corporate partner. An example of topics that may be offered: time management; social and emotional intelligence, teamwork dynamics, professionalism and positive attitude, integrity and responsibility, business etiquette.

  
  • CEMS 000/5250 - Business Project (7.5 cr.)



    Description
    The Business Project is the most complex program element of the (MIM/CEMS), as it involves at least three stakeholders: the students, the university advisor, and the client company. It mainly corresponds to a team field study project carried out by the students in Term 2. Corporate and Social Partners representatives would be invited to participate in the field study projects and offer a platform for the students to work on a real-life “problem” or managerial issue that companies would like to solve or to address. Students will develop consultant-client relationship with the organization to 1) analyze and diagnose the organization’s request: and 2) Develop the detected opportunities with proposed course of actions while applying the latest knowledge or theories in management research to problem solving.  The organization would pose challenges to the students as topics for their business projects and this topic list would be updated regularly. Faculty members from the School will serve as advisors on each project group. Each project group normally consists of three to four students and conducts a strategically focused study.

  
  • CEMS 000/5355 - International Internship (0 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Complete TERM1 and TERM 2 requirements of Master in International Management /CEMS

    Description
    Internships provide students with the real-life professional learning experience. The CEMS internship must therefore be at the level of a graduate recruit in order to provide valuable business experience. Each student is required to perform a minimum of 8-week international internship during the summer outside the home institution where he/she applied, after completing semester two. Internships can take place at a CEMS Corporate Partner, although not compulsory. They can also take place at CEMS Social Partners or other non-profit organization such as in a humanitarian mission, provided responsibility levels correspond. Students are responsible for finding their own internship and for all official documents required for the employment.


Journalism & Mass Communication

  
  • JRMC 200/2200 - Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introductory survey of the theory, history, structure, and function of mass communication in the Middle East and globally.

    Notes
    Open to all university students.
  
  • JRMC 201/2201 - Media Writing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Acceptance into the major

    Description
    Study and practice of basic writing, editing, and reporting techniques used in the international media; newsroom practices to develop listening, reading, writing and editing skills.

  
  • JRMC 202/2202 - Multimedia Writing and Production (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Cross-media study and practice of writing, reporting and production for print, broadcast, and the internet.

  
  • JRMC 203/2203 - Mass Media Ethics and Responsibility (3 cr.)



    Description
    Critical analyses of media laws and professional philosophies, standards, and practices in journalism, public relations, advertising, and other fields of mass communication. Discussion of ethical and practical considerations and dilemmas in different professional and social contexts.

  
  • JRMC 000/2208 - Media Literacy in the Digital Age (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 2200  

    Description
    This course takes both a critical (theory) and a creative (practice) approach to news and media literacy in the digital age using various media contexts. Students will activate and exercise their media literacy skills and dispositions by accessing, analyzing, and evaluating news and other media; and creating, producing, and communicating their discoveries through the use of social media platforms. 

  
  • JRMC 230/2230 - Photography Foundations 1 (3 cr.)



    Description
    History of photography, digital camera skills, visual composition, digital production, developing assignment ideas, interpreting images.
     

  
  • JRMC 250/2250 - Global Media Systems (3 cr.)



    Description
    Comparative study of global communication systems and theory in relation to national and international development.

    Notes
    Open to all university students.
  
  • JRMC 270/2270 - Online Communication (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the Internet as a medium of communication, as well as to its nature, development, and future. Students will examine how the Internet is being used, and how it is affecting communities and societies at large. Ethical aspects of the online experience will also be covered.

  
  • JRMC 000/2280 - Entertainment Media (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 2202  

    Description
    Students learn about the functions and influences of the entertainment industry - from television, film and music journalism, to video game journalism and celebrity coverage; its social and ethical parameters; and how social media is an integral component.

  
  • JRMC 299/2299 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment is limited and priority is given to students with declared JMC majors.
  
  • JRMC 301/3301 - Journalism Editing and Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Principles of, and laboratory practice in, copyediting and proofreading; headline writing; scaling and cropping photographs; and layout and design.

  
  • JRMC 000/3303 - Data for Media (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the fundamental concepts and principles that underlie techniques for extracting useful information and knowledge from digital data. The primary goal of the course is to help you view problems from a data perspective and understand how to systematically analyze such problems. This data-analytic thinking can then be applied in a variety of ways, from data journalism to customer relationship management to data-driven decision making.

  
  • JRMC 305/3305 - Introduction to Visual Communication (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introductory laboratory in basics of typography, desktop publishing, digital design of publications and advertising. Taught by lecture with practical application.

  
  • JRMC 000/3307 - Sports Media (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 201/2201 - Media Writing (3 cr.)  
    JRMC 202/2202 - Multimedia Writing and Production (3 cr.)  

    Description
    Introduction and application to the sports media industry; the course explores the essential reporting and the art of covering sports news across all media outlets (newspapers, magazines, radio, television and online media); the course covers the ethical codes that make a well balanced story in the fast growing field of sports media coverage.

  
  • JRMC 310/3310 - Public Opinion, Persuasion and Propaganda (3 cr.)



    Description
    Theoretical and practical study of the social role of international and national mass media, policymakers and the public in formation of public opinion.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Open to all university students.
  
  • JRMC 312/3312 - Multimedia Journalism Lab: The Caravan (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 2202  

    Description
    Supervised newsroom experience in reporting, writing, editing, designing and layout for print, broadcast and online version of The Caravan and AUC TV.

  
  • JRMC 315/3315 - Introduction to Advertising (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 2202  

    Description
    Survey of professional principles and practices in advertising and their relationship to business and government, with special emphasis on the United States and Egypt.

  
  • JRMC 320/3320 - Mass Communication Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Junior standing.

    Description
    Methods and theories used in mass communication research. Emphasis on the various methods and measurement tools used in message, communicator and audience measurements. They will learn to work with statistics, databases, specialized websites and other resources.

  
  • JRMC 330/3330 - Photojournalism and Documentary Practices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    History of photojournalism, advanced camera skills, photographic lighting skills, visual story-telling strategies, editing and sequencing, research subjects, building a portfolio.
     

  
  • JRMC 333/3333 - Research for Journalists (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    A research course designed specifically for journalists, providing students with a broad understanding of how to find and analyze various forms of information. They will learn to use databases, specialized websites and other Internet resources and how to organize and apply their findings for news and feature reporting.

  
  • JRMC 337/3337 - TV Scriptwriting and Production (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Classroom and field training in basic television scriptwriting and story production. Instruction in theoretical principles that differentiate television from print journalism, ethical aspects of picture use and editing and related topics. Requires weekly practice hours outside class time.

  
  • JRMC 339/3339 - Studio Production: AUC TV (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 2202  

    Description
    Techniques of television production and presentation from planning and writing to directing and producing. Topics of study include elements of various forms of television writing, production, design, lighting, graphics, program planning and production practices in a studio or workshop setting. Requires weekly practice time outside class to provide AUC TV’s daily news bulletin.
     

  
  • JRMC 355/3355 - Creative Strategy and Advertising Copywriting (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Development of creative strategy, writing advertising and promotional copy, designing and preparing layouts for various media, planning and executing written and oral presentations.

  
  • JRMC 000/3360 - Introduction to Podcasting (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to podcasting. Students will gain experience in listening, conceptualizing, organizing, writing and producing a variety of podcast formats.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring
  
  • JRMC 000/3366 - Online Behavior and Web Analytics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     Junior Standing

    Description
    This course proficiently tackles today’s business challenges with this powerful new framework that will permanently change how students think about analytics. It provides a wealth of tactics for creating a pragmatic strategy, applying analytical techniques correctly, solving challenges such as measuring social media and multi-channel campaigns, achieving optimal success by leveraging experimentation, and employing approaches for truly listening to your customers.

  
  • JRMC 000/3380 - Digital Storytelling (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    JRMC 203/2203 - Mass Media Ethics and Responsibility (3 cr.)  
    Junior Level

    Description
    Defining the components that make a good story you want to tell to your audience. Identifying the tools that best serve your story; learning the art of storytelling through the usage of emerging technologies; studying the different techniques that add value to the production process; learning the ethical standards necessary in the storytelling process in the digital age.

 

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