Sep 24, 2022  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 503/5203 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course discusses important organic classes, concepts, reactions and mechanisms not usually covered in depth in the undergraduate organic courses such as: heterocycles, photochemistry computational chemistry in modern organic chemistry and the art of planning multi-step syntheses.

  
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    CHEM 504/5204 - Methods of Structure Determination (3 cr.)



    Description
    Structure-properties relationships. Methods of structure determinations:
    diffraction methods, spectroscopic methods, resonance techniques, ionization-based techniques, magnetometry and other miscellaneous techniques. Case histories will be presented.
     

  
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    CHEM 505/5205 - Nanochemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to the basics of chemistry at the nanoscale, and would entail a general introduction to the nano world; physico-chemical considerations for properties at the nanoscale (band structures, typical and useful “nano effects” etc…); basic synthesis and fabrication methods for nano structures (top-down and bottom up approaches).

    Cross-listed
    NANO 5205 
  
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    CHEM 000/5206 - Advanced Food Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    Chemistry of food constituents, the changes these constituents undergo during processing, the chemistry and technology of meat and meat products, dairy products, fruit and vegetables, cereal products and alcoholic/non-alcoholic beverages, basic chemistry of color, odor and taste (sensory properties of foodstuffs).

  
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    CHEM 511/5211 - Applied Food Microbiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course consists of two lectures and one laboratory session per week. It is designed to train students on different aspects of food microbiology. It focuses on the biology and practical aspects of both pathogenic microorganisms and useful industrial bacteria associated with foodstuffs. The course also considers topics on food preservation regimes and laboratory methods for the detection of various food-born bacteria. Much emphasis is being placed on practical training via extensive laboratory classes planned in this course. This training involves practical work on both classical and modern methodologies in food microbiology.

  
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    CHEM 512/5212 - Food Safety Assurance (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course prepares students to participate in food safety monitoring and maintenance in various food industry and governmental health inspection sectors. The course encompasses topics on food-associated hazards and approaches to ensure food safety. In addition to lectures, the course will involve problem-based learning, class discussions and hands-on training on the application of food safety assurance systems. Multiple visits to modern safety units within food processing plants will be organized.

  
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    CHEM 513/5213 - Food Packaging (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the principles of Food Packaging including the chemistry and technology of packaging materials (metal, glass, plastics, and paper/paperboard), It will also cover main packaging technologies (Modified Atmosphere Packaging, Aseptic Packaging, Active and Intelligent Packaging, etc.) and technical processes for the production of packaging materials (extrusion, co-extrusion, lamination, high vacuum metallization, etc.). It will stress the significance of the phenomena of migration and permeation in packaging materials and finally it will review the main applications of packaging to basic food commodities.

  
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    CHEM 514/5214 - Nutritional Evaluation of Food during Processing (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course is designed to provide the students with in-depth information on the principles of food selection and food preparation. This course covers the physical, chemical, and nutritional changes which occur in food during storage, cooking, processing and preservation.

  
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    CHEM 515/5215 - Food Additives, Contaminants and Legislation (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course discusses the principles and various aspects of food additive utilization. It will train students on how to use analytical techniques to distinguish between “natural” and “artificial” additives.
    Regulation and approval of additives for use in foods will be covered.
     

  
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    CHEM 517/5217 - Sensory Evaluation of Food Products (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course consists of two lectures and one laboratory session per week. It investigates the nutritional, chemical, physical, and sensory properties of foods in relation to preparation procedures. It will present sensory characteristics of foods and assessment of color, texture, and flavor. The course will give the student the ability to apply sensory testing of foods, practice different types of sensory tests, and understand errors in sensory testing. It will assess the best environment for sensory testing and procedures of sensory testing, measurements and scales. Statistical analysis of sensory data such as discrimination tests, descriptive tests, hedonic tests, affective tests will also be discussed.

  
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    CHEM 518/5218 - Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals (3 cr.)



    Description
    Functional foods & nutraceuticals (FFN) and herbal products present some potential to improve the long-term health of the population through disease prevention. The move of FFN into the mainstream is part of the shift towards a preventative approach to health and disease and a move away from relying on pharmaceuticals to treat disease. This course introduces students to the FFN industry with its diversity of natural health products (NHP). Topics will cover classes of FFN and their connection to foods and drugs. Aspects of the development, production, quality control and assurance of FFN will be discussed. The safety and efficacy of individual FFN products are emphasized. Issues regarding the unique regulatory environment of natural heath products and their influence on the development and commercialization of these products in global markets will be presented.

  
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    CHEM 519/5219 - Food Analysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and application of chemical, physical and instrumental methods of food analysis. Modern separation and instrumental analysis techniques that are used for detection of food constituents (e.g. moisture, ash, nitrogen, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals, etc) as well as contaminants (e.g. mycotoxins, pesticide residues, antimicrobial agents, heavy metals, etc) are stressed. Topics will include sample handling, preparation and analysis as well as the evaluation and reporting of data. Key analytical and separation techniques such as spectroscopy, titration, potentiometry, atomic absorption, chromatography and mass spectrometry will also be presented.

  
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    CHEM 000/5220 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3 cr.)



    Description
    Analysis & application of the physiological, biological and biochemical basis for differences in nutritional requirements throughout the principle stages of the life cycle - pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, older adulthood and the ways in which social & environmental factors influence nutritional status at each stage. This course provides an overview of nutrition during each life stage, commencing in utero, and continuing throughout the life cycle. It will discuss the biology of development, growth, maturation and aging and its impact on nutrition requirements, how to assess diet and nutrition status and how nutritional requirements can be achieved in the context of each major life stage.

  
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    CHEM 000/5221 - Nutrition & Diseases (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course provides the relationship between diet, nutrition and disease. The course will cover the methodology used to determine dietary, nutritional and body composition techniques and how evidence is gathered to determine the links between diet, nutrition and health. The relationship between diet and nutrition and the prevention and management of specific diseases and conditions such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis will be covered in depth. Main topics are: Malnutrition (obesity and undernutrition); metabolic syndrome; diabetes; cardiovascular diseases; food allergies, food intolerance, osteoporosis and cancer.

  
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    CHEM 000/5222 - Clinical Nutrition (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CHEM 5201  

    Description
    Clinical nutrition aims to provide a thorough grounding in all aspects of clinical nutrition and its application in prevention and disease management. This course reviews the array of assessment tools used in clinical nutrition practice including methodology, application, implications, strengths and limitations. During this course attention goes to various ways by which nutrition can be applied; oral nutrition and supplementations, tube feeding, parenteral nutrition. Students shall learn when to apply these different nutritional interventions and the pros and cons of the different feeding techniques.

  
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    CHEM 541/5241 - The Chemistry of Nanostructures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CHEM 5205 

    Description
    This course addresses the synthesis and chemical properties of the different categories of nanostructures such as carbon NANOubes/nanorods/ etc…, fullerenes, colloids, Self-assembled monolayer structures (SAMs), dendrimers and other macromolecules, oxide and inorganic nanotubes/fibers/rods/etc. For each category examples of applications would be giving to demonstrate the applicability of the properties discussed.

    Cross-listed
    NANO 5241 
  
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    CHEM 542/5242 - Nanoelectrochemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

     

    Description
    This course addresses the fundamentals of electrochemistry, and their application to the synthesis of nanostructures, together with applications (e.g. sensors, fuel cells, batteries, electrolysis, photovoltaic cells, reduction of carbon dioxide, environmental remediation, water disinfection, ect…). Characterization and analysis techniques would also be addressed.

    Cross-listed
    NANO 5242 
  
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    CHEM 552/5910 - Independent Study in Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of biotechnology may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings are assigned and frequent consultation held. Students may sign for up to 3 credits towards fulfilling M.Sc. requirements.
     

  
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    CHEM 551/5930 - Selected Topics in Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor

    Description
    Topics include: polymer science, quantum chemistry and spectroscopy, and molecular symmetry and applications.

  
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    CHEM 599/5980 - Research Guidance and Thesis (3 cr. + 3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    SCI 5940  

    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. Must be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.

  
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    CHEM 603/6103 - Bioseparation Processes for Food and Pharmaceutical Industries (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course deals with the separation processes used in food and pharmaceutical industries for the isolation and purification of biological molecules. The focus is on the science and engineering concepts underlying the separation, as well as the process calculations associated with each bioseparation unit operation. Key topics include principles and design calculations of centrifugation and cell disruption, extraction phase separations and equipment design, absorption equilibrium and column dynamics, chromatography plate theory, chromatography equipment and methods, dynamic scale-up, electric-field based methods, engineering analysis of membrane processes, membrane concentration polarization and fouling, modeling of filtration processes, crystallization and drying operations, and overall process development.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CHEM 615/6105 - Principles and Applications of Mass Spectrometry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course addresses the theory of mass spectrometry and develops the technique as a modern analytical tool to solving research problems in chemistry and biochemistry. It also addresses gas-phase ion chemistry. The course will be delivered in three sections: instrumentation, theory and applications. Topics will include ionization techniques, mass separation techniques and mass analyzers, ion dissociation, ion mobility, in addition it will include sophisticated experimental methods, such as tandem in space and tandem in time mass spectrometry. Mass spectral interpretation will also be covered for various applications, including environmental, food chemistry and medical sciences.

  
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    CHEM 000/6107 - Chemistry of Natural and Synthetic Polymers (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

     

    Description
    Synthesis and characterization of natural and synthetic polymers, their applications in drug delivery systems, food and goods storage and packaging, polymer nanocomposites, polymeric membranes.

  
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    CHEM 640/6240 - Nanoporous Materials (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     NANO 5205 

    Description
    Review of the field of nanoprous materials. Synthesis, characterization and surface modification. Adsorption and separation processes, biological and catalytic applications. Nanoporous materials for the removal of pollutants in the gaseous and liquid phases.

  
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    CHEM 000/6910 - Independent Study in Chemistry (3 cr. max.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of Chemistry may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

  
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    CHEM 000/6930 - Advanced Selected Topics in Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.

  
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    CHEM 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.


     

  
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    SCI 105/1005 - Science and Technology of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Not for credit for Science, Engineering and Computer Science students.

    Description
    Development of civilization in ancient Egypt. Primitive time reckoning and measurement. Building materials. Outline of the different chemical arts and crafts which developed in Egypt as interpreted from mural paintings and works of art. Mummification. Aspects of mathematics and medicine in ancient Egypt.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 109/1009 - Exploration of the Universe (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Not for credit for Science, Engineering and Computer Science students.

    Description
    An introduction to historical and conceptual developments in astronomy. Stars and galaxies: the sun as a case history in stellar evolution; the formation of elements in the stars. A survey of the sky with particular attention to the solar system: the members of the solar system as physical bodies with specific structures and as entities whose motion characteristics can be understood and predicted.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 150L/1015 - General Science Laboratory (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or concurrently and not for credit for Science, Engineering and Computer Science students, except for Actuarial Science students.

    Description
    Introduction to experimental techniques of measurement in the general fields of physics, chemistry, and other sciences.

    Hours
    One three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall, spring, and occasionally in winter and summer
  
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    SCI 120/1020 - Scientific Thinking (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course emphasizes the unifying aspects of the scientific approach to the study of nature and human behavior. About one-third of the course is devoted to scientific inquiry and investigation. The course focuses on fact identification and concept formation and testing. In the remaining parts, the students are exposed to applications of the approach in various disciplines. The course sets some basic concepts and theories of science into broad historical, philosophical, and cultural context and traces the development of these theories to their present status. This serves the double purpose of acquainting students with the appropriate setting in which a given idea gained relevance and exposing them to the evolution toward the current methods of investigation. Moral and ethical issues in science are examined.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 199/1930 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    SCI 240/2004 - Chemistry, Art and Archaeology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course provides students with some grounding in the application of Natural Sciences to the solution of problems related to Art and Archaeology and instigates in them an appreciation of the complementary contributions of the Humanities and Sciences to the study of particular phenomenon.  Students are introduced to analytical scientific techniques on a need to know basis depending on relevant applications.  Celebrated cases of fakes and forgeries are discussed.  The course aims at enhancing the student’s analytical ability and skills to solve problems related to forgery.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 250/2005 - Introduction to Geology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The environment of Earth and the natural forces that shape it; Earth’s materials, origin and its 4.5 billion years history; geological events and their implications in finding oil and gas and other natural energy resources; economic contributions of geology to the environment; special case studies with emphasis on Egypt are discussed.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 260/2006 - Environmental Geology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Environmental geology is applied geology focussing briefly on the entire spectrum of possible interactions between people and the physical environment.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    SCI 251L/2015 - Introduction to Geology Lab (1 cr.)



    Description
    Introduction to the physical properties of the earth material. Identification of minerals and all types of rocks; mode of preservation and identification; of fossils; topographic maps and map readings; geological maps and cross sections; remote sensing (aerial photography).

    Hours
    One three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    SCI 302/3002 - Science, Technology and the Environment (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Junior standing or higher.

    Description
    An introductory, multidisciplinary approach to studying the relationships between science, technology and the environment. Principles of ecosystem structure, function, balance, communities and populations. Principles of environmental sciences, outline of crises, overpopulation, depletion and pollution. Framework for understanding environmental problems. Group projects, aimed at exploring broad range of environmental issues from an interdisciplinary approach, constitute a major component of the course.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    SCI 450/4005 - Geology of Raw Materials (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of instructor

    Description
    An interdisciplinary study. The geology of naturally occurring minerals, methods for determining the utility of natural resources, and the environmentally sound industrial conversion of raw materials. Particular attention given to the natural resources of Egypt, especially to their importance in economic development.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    SCI 000/5940 - Graduate Thesis Seminar (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of 9 cr hrs

    Description
    Seminar on research topics, research methodology, proposal and thesis writing. The course is intended to serve as a forum in which graduate students can present and discuss their research work and learn various research skills


Comparative Religion

  
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    CREL 299/2096 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Global Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    CREL 299/2097 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Arab World Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    CREL 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    CREL 135/2601 - Dimensions of the Sacred: Exploring Religious Experience (3 cr.)



    Description
    What defines religion? What might explain the practically universal impulse to recognize the divine? This course investigates a variety of religions, according to common dimensions held by them that run across cultures: the social; the ethical; the doctrinal; the ritual; the mythic; the experiential; and the artistic.

  
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    CREL 210/2603 - Religions of the World (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the academic study of religion. By looking at the history, beliefs, practices, institutions and cultural expressions of a number of different religions, students will broaden their understanding of religions other than their own, and of the diversity of the human religious experience. Students will learn to appreciate the variety of the religions of the world, and the similarities and differences between them.

  
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    CREL 212/2605 - The Quest for the Historical Jesus (3 cr.)



    Description
    Investigates the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth within the context of Second Temple Judaism and Greco-Roman culture. Considers a range of pre-modern and modern interpretations of Jesus and the emergence of Christianity.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
  
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    CREL 220/2606 - Hinduism and Buddhism in India (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore the major dimensions of the two most important religions in India from 1500 BCE to 1000 CE. Along with providing an introduction to these two traditions, the course will give particular attention to the ways in which these religions have interacted historically.

  
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    CREL 230/2607 - Pilgrimage Traditions in the World’s Religions (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines pilgrimage as a unifying theme in exploration of human religiosity. While we will focus on what are called “ritual pilgrimages”, such as the Islamic hajj, we will also explore pilgrimage more metaphorically, by looking at the allegorical, mythological, and visionary journeys. As frameworks for our analyses, we will also look at humanistic and social scientific interpretive and theoretical models concerning pilgrimage.

  
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    CREL 333/3209 - Zionism and Modern Judaism (3 cr.)



    Description
    The Zionist ideology and movement in its own terms, and in the context of modern Judaism. The course places Zionism in its historical and religious contexts, and examines its varieties. The Zionist movement is followed from its origins to the establishment of Israel. Related aspects of Israeli politics are then examined, with especial reference to ideological and religious debates

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
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    CREL 320/3608 - Masters, Saints, and Saviors: Sacred Biography in the World’s Religions (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore one of the most important subjects in religious literature, the lives of great spiritual figures. We will investigate a variety of biographical and autobiographical materials from several different religious traditions, examining both form and function and testing whether or not we can make useful cross-cultural comparisons.

  
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    CREL 529/5609 - World Religions and the Study of Religion (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Islamic Studies MA program.

     

    Description
    This course will introduce students to the great world religions other than Islam, and will introduce them to current theories and methods in the academic field of Religious Studies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .


Computer Science and Engineering

  
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    CSCE 102/1000 - Introduction to Computers and their Applications (3 cr.)



    Description
    Introduction to computer-related terms and concepts. Scope limitations of the computer capabilities. Ethics and social impact of using computers. Basic skills related to the familiarity and efficient use of computer input/output devices, operating systems and computer communications. Training on popular computer applications (e.g. word processing, spread sheet, database and presentation graphics). Limited programming experience in a high-level language.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    This course is intended for arts students.
  
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    CSCE 106/1001 - Fundamentals of Computing I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    College level preparation course in Mathematics or   .

    Description
    Introduces fundamental concepts and principles of computing systems, grand challenges in computing, analyzing and formulating solutions to multidisciplinary problems, basic algorithms for solving problems, as well as designing, implementing, and testing programs using one prime language and other supplementary languages. Using data and procedural abstractions as basic design principles, students learn how to design and implement basic data structures such as stacks and queues, and to apply various algorithms for operating on them. Also covers some numbering systems, data representation, and basic computer organization. The course uses the imperative and object-oriented paradigms.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 110/1101 - Fundamentals of Computing II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1001   and concurrent with CSCE 1102  

    ECNG students not required to take CSCE 1102 

    Description
    Introduces concepts and techniques for developing larger software systems. The object-oriented paradigm is further utilized using a modern programming language such as Java or C++. Covers topics that include classes and objects, inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism, more algorithms, basic design patterns, generics, testing. Also covers the design and implementation of data structures including but not limited to lists, trees, and graphs.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    CSCE 000/1102 - Fundamentals of Computing II Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with CSCE 1101  

    Description
    The laboratory will contribute to the capacity building and practice of knowledge units covered in CSCE 1101  (Fundamentals of Computing II).

  
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    CSCE 321/2202 - Analysis and Design of Algorithms (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      (or concurrent) and  CSCE 1101 . Must be taken concurrently with CSCE 2203 .

    Description
    Analysis and complexity bounds of basic classes of algorithms. Basic algorithm design methodologies: Brute force, Transform and Conquer, Divide and conquer, and Greedy methods. Dynamic Programming, Backtracking and Branch and Bound methods. Applications to problems such as sorting and searching, traveling salesperson, knapsack, optimal merge patterns and graph algorithms. Introduction to the theory of complexity.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 000/2203 - Analysis and Design of Algorithms Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 2131  or concurrent, and concurrent with CSCE 2202 

    Description
    The laboratory will contribute to the capacity building and practice of knowledge units covered in CSCE 2202  (Analysis and Design of Algorithms).

  
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    CSCE 230/2301 - Digital Design I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or concurrent. Must be taken concurrently with CSCE 2302 .

    Description
    Basic logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic minimization algorithms, modular design of combinational circuits, introduction to computer arithmetic, memory elements, sequential circuits, Finite State Machines analysis and design, top-down digital systems design approach, timing aspects of digital systems. Exposure to modern Electronic Design Automation tools, Hardware Description Languages and programmable logic devices. The laboratory component will cover experiments in digital electronics.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 239L/2302 - Digital Design I Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with   .

    Description
    The laboratory will cover experiments in digital design and experiments illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 231/2303 - Computer Organization and Assembly Language Programming (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  and (CSCE 2301  or ECNG 2101 ) cannot be taken concurrently with PHYS 2211  

    Description
    Different components of a modern computer system are studied; how they function, how to program them, and how to utilize their communication interfaces to make them work in harmony. The course tackles hardware interface programming techniques that provide an underlying infrastructure for operating system policies to utilize. Assembly language programming is thoroughly covered as the primary means to develop hands-on knowledge controlling major components of modern computer systems, namely CPU, Memory, and I/O devices. Course has programming hands-on in, but not limited to, the following: ISA instructions, RISC, CISC, processor modes, memory hierarchy, virtual memory, interrupts, I/O devices (memory and port mapped), DMA channels, PCI devices, and timers.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 253/2501 - Fundamentals of Database Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  

    Description
    Basic concepts, database system environment, DBMS. Components and architecture access structures, indexing and hashing, high-level data models, ER and EER model, the relational model, relational languages, relational algebra, relational calculus, SQL, introduction to functional dependencies and normalization, social and ethical context of databases.

    When Offered
    Offered in Fall and Spring
  
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    CSCE 201/2502 - Information Technology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

    Description
    Module 1: The Components of Information Technology: data technology, processing technology, and networking technology. Module 2: Computer Ethics and Social Issues. Module 3: Business, Economic and Development Impacts of Information Technology. Module 4: Computer Applications (in which students will be given the chance to create, modify and interact with sophisticated computer applications.)

    When Offered
    Offered once every year.
  
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    CSCE 315/3101 - Programming Language (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1001  

    Description
    A programming language different from those studied in   and   will be presented according to the interest of both students and faculty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    Students may repeat this course with different languages but only a maximum of four credits can be counted toward the concentration requirements.
  
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    CSCE 316/3102 - Programming in Java (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  

    Description
    This course offers intermediate programming concepts in the Java programming language to include virtual machines, dynamic type checking, object serialization, inheritance and polymorphism, file manipulation, interfaces and packages. Java Applets, event handling, multithreading and network-based application development in Java are also covered along with a set of selected topics such as remote method invocation and remote database access using the language.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    CSCE 317/3103 - Object Oriented Programming (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  

    Description
    In-depth study of a typical object-oriented programming language (C++) from a software engineering perspective, with emphasis on features supporting the development of large, efficient and reusable object-oriented applications. Principles and practice of three software development paradigms: developing classes from scratch, reuse of existing classes, incremental extension of frameworks. Encapsulation, templates, polymorphism, dynamic binding and virtual methods, operator’s overloading, complex associations, dynamic aggregation, inheritance (single and multiple), exception handling, the standard template library. Introduction to UML for describing program designs.

    When Offered
    Offered Occasionally.
  
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    CSCE 325/3104 - Concepts of Programming Languages (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  

    Description
    Comparative study of abstraction, syntax, semantics, binding times, data and sequence control, run-time resources, translators, and storage of programming languages. Programming projects using selected programming languages to enhance practical aspects.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 330/3301 - Computer Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  . Must be taken concurrently with CSCE 3302 .

    Description
    The objectives of this course are to introduce the principles of Modern Computer Architecture and design. Topics to be discussed include Instruction Set Architectures, CPU data path design, CPU pipelining, Pipelining hazards, Instruction level parallelism, Dynamic scheduling, Speculation, Thread level parallelism, Multiprocessors, Memory hierarchy, Cache, Cache coherence, and Virtual memory.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 339L/3302 - Computer Architecture Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Concurrent with   

    Description
    The laboratory will cover experiments in computer architecture and hardware design and experiments illustrating material of course   .

    Cross-listed
    Same as   
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    CSCE 332/3303 - Fundamental Microelectronics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and CSCE 2301  or concurrent

    Description
    The course covers topics related to electronic devices and their applications such as diodes, transistors (BJT and MOSFET), and operational amplifiers with an emphasis on digital CMOS circuits design, simulation and analysis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 337/3304 - Digital Design II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   .

    Description
    VLSI fabrication, Design of complex CMOS gates, Combinational and Sequential logic structures in VLSI; Semiconductor memories and array structures; Introduction of ASIC design techniques and tools; design and programming of FPGAs using CAD tools; timing in sequential circuits; essential hazards; races in sequential circuits; Digital systems design; Datapath and Control design; Modeling and simulation; Fault models and testing.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 333/3311 - Data and Computer Communications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  and   

    Description
    Overview the network protocol stack and TCP/IP. Data transmission technologies, transmission impairments and channel capacity. Basics of wired and wireless transmission media. Signal encoding techniques. Introduction to error detection and correction. LAN fundamentals, Ethernet LANs, WLANs and MAC protocols. Cellular networks fundamental concepts and evolution from 1G to 5G networks.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 435/3312 - Computer Networks (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    PHYS 2211  and concurrent with CSCE 3313 

    Description
    Covers the fundamentals of computer networking. Topics include Introduction to computer networks, historical perspective and types, switching techniques, the concept of layering, network performance metrics, data link layer, network layer, IP networking and addressing, and the transport layer.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 439L/3313 - Computer Networks Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with CSCE 3312 .

    Description
    Offers hands-on experience in the area of computer networks. This includes basic network components, equipment, and experiments on network monitoring and virtualization tools, link layer, network layer, transport layer and application layer protocols, along with well-known static and dynamic routing protocols, in use in the Internet today.

    When Offered
    Offered in the Fall and Spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 345/3401 - Operating Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 2303  and concurrent with CSCE 3402  

    Description
    Operating systems concepts and structure. The Kernel, interrupts, system calls. Process concepts, operations, and implementation. Threads. Concurrency, interprocess communication and synchronization. Process scheduling. Resources and deadlocks. Memory management: swapping, paging, segmentation, virtual memory. File system interface, protection. Case studies: Windows, Linux, and MINIX.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 000/3402 - Operating Systems Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  and CSCE 3301  

    Description
    Fundamentals of systems programming, standard administration tools, shell programming, Make utility, file I/O, access rights for files and directories, system data files and information, system configuration, Unix processes, process control, synchronization, signals, daemons, interprocess communication, kernel adaptation and generation.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 342/3421 - Fundamentals of Computing and Communication Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course exposes attendees in breadth to the most viable systems relating to Information Technology, and their associated administration. This includes networking fundamentals and related management, operating systems, computer organization and architecture, hardware, firmware, and enterprise applications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Notes
    This course is not available for either Computer Science or Computer Engineering students.
  
  •  

    CSCE 346/3422 - Introduction to Information Security (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    This course introduces foundations of information security. It addresses cyber-security issues and common threats, basics of network security, general security principles and practices, basics of cryptology and cryptanalysis, information security management, and other selected topics.
    Not allowed for Computer Science or Computer Engineering students.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 465/3601 - Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 2202  

    Description
    The course will introduce students to the main foundational concepts and techniques used in Artificial Intelligence including searching and problem solving methods, representing knowledge, dealing with uncertainty, probabilistic reasoning, planning, learning decision rules from data, and statistical learning.

    When Offered
    Normally offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CSCE 363/3611 - Digital Signal Processing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and junior standing.

    Description
    Characterizations of signals, ADC and DAC, Fourier series and Fourier transform for discrete and continuous time signals, sampling, Digital spectrum analysis, discrete transforms, digital filters, audio and image processing applications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 341/3701 - Software Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  

    Description
    Basic concepts of software engineering project management, ethical and social issues as well as the software development life cycle. Techniques for software specification, design, implementation, validation, verification and documentation. State-of-the art tools for computer-aided software engineering (CASE tools) are used to support term projects.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 447/4101 - Compiler Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Principles and practices in the design of compilers. Lexical analysis. Syntax analysis, top-down and bottom-up parsing. Syntax-directed translation and syntax trees. Declarations, types, and symbol management. Run-time environments, storage organization, parameter passing, dynamic storage allocation. Intermediate languages and intermediate code generation. Code generation and optimization.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    Project: students construct a simple compiler that generates unoptimized code.
  
  •  

    CSCE 422/4201 - Theory of Computing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and Senior standing.

    Description
    Finite automata and regular expressions, context-free grammars and push-down automata, nondeterminism. Context-sensitive grammars and the Chomsky hierarchy of grammars. Turing machine and the halting problem. Undecidable problems. Church’s Conjecture and its implications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CSCE 432/4301 - Embedded Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 3301 CSCE 3401 CSCE 3312 , and Concurrent with CSCE 4302 

    Description
    This is a hands-on course on the theory and practice of developing low-power embedded systems with real-time constraints. Students will learn how to develop embedded hardware and software, interface a variety of sensors and actuators for interactive systems, communicate over embedded networks and use RTOS kernel to develop embedded software. The course will culminate with a significant project which will extend the concepts covered earlier in the course

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 438L/4302 - Embedded Systems Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     Concurrent with    

    Description
    The laboratory will cover experiments in embedded systems illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 000/4303 - Embedded Systems on Chip Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 3304  and CSCE 4301  

    Description
    Systems-on-Chip (SoCs) are at the core of most embedded computing and consumer devices nowadays. The course gives Hands-on coverage of the breadth of computer engineering within the context of SoCs, including on-chip memories and buses, I/O interfacing, RTL design of accelerators, firmware development and OS support. The course emphasizes hardware/software tradeoffs, and hardware/software codesign.

    When Offered
    Fall
  
  •  

    CSCE 437/4313 - Local and Metropolitan Area Networks (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Introduction to LAN, MAN and WAN. Topologies and transmission media. Protocol Architecture and Logical Link Control. Traditional LANs. High-Speed Ethernet-Like LANs, FDDI. ATM LANs. Wireless LANs. Network performance and management.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 436L/4314 - Local Area Networks Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    The laboratory will cover experiments in Local Area Networks to support and illustrate the material of the course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 000/4315 - Internet of Things Networking Protocols (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 2202  

    Description
    Covers introduction to networking fundamentals, Internet of Things (IoT) performance metrics, energy-efficient networking, IoT link layer protocols, e.g., IEEE 802.11, Bluetooth, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and IEEE 802.15.4, IoT network layer protocols, e.g., 6LoWPAN and Routing Protocol for Low Power and Lossy Networks (RPL), transport and application layer protocols, e.g., Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) and Message Queue Telemetry Transport (MQTT).

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 445/4411 - Fundamentals of Distributed Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Introduction to distributed systems. Modeling, specifications, consistency, fault tolerance, interprocess communication, network and distributed operating systems, distributed mutual exclusion, distributed deadlock detection, load balancing and process migration.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CSCE 446/4421 - Computer Security (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Fundamentals of computer security. Identification and authentication. Access control, different approaches for inclusion of a security kernel. Security in UNIX and Windows. How security is broken and how it is evaluated. Distributed systems security, World Wide Web security, and network security. Practical experience to be gained through an assigned project to evaluate the security of a real operational system.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CSCE 453/4501 - Database Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Advanced relational database theory: functional dependencies, multivalued dependencies, join dependencies, inclusion dependencies. System catalog implementation, query optimization techniques, transaction processing, concurrency control, database security, backup and recovery strategies. Advanced data modeling (e.g. object-oriented databases), distributed and client server architectures, and further exposure to social and ethical issues in databases.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CSCE 456/4502 - Design of Web-based Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 2501  or MOIS 3201 *

    *for MICT students only

    Description
    Introduction to the Web as a platform, the Web as an n-tier client-server architecture, basic components of a web-based application, developing static and dynamic web pages. Enhancing Web pages using Scripting languages. Developing Web-based applications. Using Server-extension techniques and tools. Introduction to XML and its associated technologies. Emerging technologies and tools on the web. Wireless Web protocols and techniques.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall

  
  •  

    CSCE 401/4503 - Internet-based Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    The World Wide Web as a business domain, E-Business and E-Commerce, Network Options and Infrastructure, HTML/XML and WWW Site Design, Emerging technologies, WWW Tools, Internet Issues and Implications (Security issues, social and ethical issues, legal issues), Costs and Resources, Internet Services Providers.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 427/4602 - Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  ,  and   

    Description
    An introduction to basic concepts in the design, analysis, and application for computational neural networks. Mathematical models of biological neurons. Multilayer perceptrons backward error propagation. Hopfield networks and Boltzmann machines. Radial-basis function networks. Kohonen self-organizing feature maps. Adaptive Resonance Theory networks.

    When Offered
    Offered Occasionally.
  
  •  

    CSCE 000/4603 - Fundamentals of Computer Vision (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 110/1101 - Fundamentals of Computing II (3 cr.)  

    Description
    Image acquisition, image transformations, gray level operations, histogram equalization, spatial filtering, edge detection, line and circle detection, generalized Hough transform, connected components labeling. Haar features, object detection with Adaboost, applications: face detection, open CV programming.

  
  •  

    CSCE 000/4604 - Practical Machine Deep Learning (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 2202  

    MACT 1122  

    Description
    Supervised and Unsupervised learning, Logistic and soft-max regression, Perception and multilayer neural networks, Back-propagation, Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), Recurrent Neural Network, Generative models, Reinforcement Learning, case studies.

  
  •  

    CSCE 455/4621 - Computer Graphics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    CSCE 1101  ,  

    Description
    Overview of graphic systems and interactive devices. Output primitives and their attributes. Two-dimensional transformations, segments, windowing, and clipping. Introduction to three-dimensional representation and viewing.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CSCE 441/4701 - Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The structure of complex systems. The evolution and elements of the object model. The nature of objects and classes. Relationships among classes and objects. Object-oriented analysis and design. Putting key object-oriented techniques to work in constructing large-scale software systems. Case studies covered to demonstrate the use of an object-oriented development process in the construction of software systems. Object-oriented metrics. Testing object-oriented software. Performance evaluation. Advanced topics including design patterns and component-based software development.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
  
  •  

    CSCE 448/4702 - Secure Systems Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   

    Description
    This course introduces the main security problems found in contemporary systems and addresses how such problems are introduced and how we may work towards their eradication. The course enables students to treat security issues as an important and integral part of system design and development. It also provides them with a solid understanding of the basic ideas and techniques used in assessing and addressing security risks.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 495/4910 - Guided Studies in Computer Science and Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    Under the guidance of a faculty member, the student carries on a reading, research, or a project on a specific computer-science topic. The student will present his/her results by submitting a report or passing an examination as determined by the supervisor.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CSCE 485/4930 - Selected Topics in Computer Science and Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Junior standing or higher.

    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and major students. May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
 

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