Mar 20, 2023  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Global Public Health

  
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    GHHE 000/5220 - Principles and Methods of Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This introductory course will cover principles and methods of applied infectious disease epidemiology. It will cover infectious disease terminology and epidemiology, as well as immunity, and how researchers study infectious diseases, its distribution, risk factors and causes, transmission, and control of selected infectious diseases relevant to the Middle East and Africa. At the end of the course, infectious diseases of global importance and their associated challenges, as well as the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases will be highlighted.

  
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    GHHE 000/5230 - Environmental Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an introduction to topics and methods in environmental epidemiology. Topical areas include selected air and water pollutants, radiation, pesticides, metals, environmental microbial exposures, persistent organic pollutants, hydraulic fracturing, endocrine-disrupting chemicals, disaster epidemiology, and climate change. Exposure assessment and statistical methods for evaluation of environmental and occupational factors will be considered in the context of specific applications. The course will prepare students to critically interpret environmental epidemiologic research, understand the types of questions that can and cannot be answered in environmental epidemiology, and help provide a foundation for designing and conducting such studies.

  
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    GHHE 000/5240 - Genetic and Cancer Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Genetic Epidemiology is a field of study that deals with the genetic etiology and distribution of diseases in populations. This course will provide students with a focused exposure to genetic analysis, with a major emphasis on association analysis. Topics will include different approaches to measuring the association of genes with disease: family history, heritability, and genetic association, how to model gene- environment interactions, epigenetics, and Mendelian Randomization as an approach to causal inference. Students will be exposed to the tools needed to critically review the literature in genetic epidemiology and human genetics. Cancer epidemiology and risk factors will be a particular focus by way of illustration.

  
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    GHHE 000/5250 - Epidemiology of Malnutrition, Metabolic Disorders, Obesity and Diabetes (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an exposition of major issues associated with poor nutrition, nutrient deficiencies, the surge in disorders of metabolism, obesity and diabetes epidemiology. The course will focus on methodological approaches relevant to research and relying on current literature. The interplay between mental health, behavior, societal factors and mass communication will also be addressed.

  
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    GHHE 000/5260 - Reproductive and Child Health Epidemiology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is a survey of pressing issues relevant to the epidemiologic study of reproductive, perinatal, and children health. A combination of lectures, readings and class discussion, the course will expose the student to challenges confronting women and children in MENA and Africa, as well as other LMICs, such as informal and rural settlements, education, labor and the impact of environmental risk factors, inclusive of the availability of effective health care. Students will better appreciate the important issues and challenges inherent in research within this field.

  
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    GHHE 000/5270 - Community-Driven Epidemiology: Environmental Justice and Equity (3 cr.)



    Description
    Low income communities and countries represent largely an unmet challenge for public health policy makers and scientists to conduct research on environmental and occupational hazards that impact their health. This community-driven research requires epidemiologists and other biomedical scientists to modify approaches used in more traditional research in order to engage these communities in identifying problems, provide solutions and insure sustainability. This class introduces concepts and methods in community-driven engagement, environmental equity research, and presents research needs, and offers opportunities for active involvement in problem-solving in environmental justice research through field work in urban and desert settlements. Methodological topics include public health and social justice, study design and analysis in environmental and occupational epidemiology, development of community-driven research questions, community-based participatory research, and preparation of reports that address community and policy needs. Possible topics include pesticide exposure, water scarcity and pollution, nutrition, sanitation, and energy production from biomass.

  
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    GHHE 000/5280 - Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    Provides training in systematic review and meta-analysis. Topics include problem definition, defining and searching the literature, extracting results and study characteristics, data set preparation, publication bias and funnel plot analysis, analysis of overall heterogeneity, stratified and meta-regression analysis of study and population characteristics, and preparation of reports for publication.

  
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    GHHE 000/5290 - Health Analytics and Informatics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Like many fields, if not more so, Public Health is not immune from the “big data revolution”. The “how” do healthcare providers, community groups, researchers and policy makers, mine, analyze, and use data to understand and improve population health, as well as keep an eye out for the impact of global practices/crises on local communities defines Health Analytics and Informatics. This course introduces students to key big data sources and analytic techniques, understand the differences between big data approaches and traditional statistics, and the techniques applicable to the areas of epidemiology and risk assessment, policy, health systems, community, and global health. Through case studies students will evaluate application, ethics, bias, and effectiveness of big data strategies.

  
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    GHHE 000/5330 - The Earth Lab (3 cr.)



    Description
    Environmental Assessment of Risk and Toxics on Health {EARTH] is an environmental quality and health monitoring and assessment laboratory that exposes and enables the student to common hands-on techniques and instrumentation used in environmental and biological monitoring. Students learn laboratory, field, and analytical skills through a solid introduction to experimental research in environmental sciences and engineering. Students are provided with applications in limnology, aquatic chemistry, analyses of environmental and biological specimens, and industrial hygiene measurements. Tests for volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, particulate matter and persistent pollutants will be covered.

  
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    GHHE 000/5331 - Health Effects of Environmental Agents (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to the general principles underlying the health effects of environmental agents. Students will gain an understanding of the mechanisms of interactions between environmental agents and living systems. This course will enable students to apply information derived from fundamental microbiology and toxicology studies to assessment of health hazards associated with exposure to environmental agents, identifying point and non-point sources, environmental transformation, and to predict the health consequences of these agents

  
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    GHHE 000/5332 - Environmental Exposure Assessment (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is intended to develop an understanding and appreciation of environmental exposure assessment and its role in providing the tools and information for toxicology, epidemiology, and risk management. In addition to the sampling, analytical, and mathematical fundamentals, the lectures incorporate real-world examples drawn from methods development in the National Exposure Research Laboratory of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) and the CDC-National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (CDC-NIOSH). Where LMIC nations, including Egypt, stand in terms of activity, regulation and enforcement will be compared in order to develop a paradigm for evolving improvement. Statistical concepts will be limited to calculations that can be performed on standard spreadsheet software as an initial introduction to key concepts.

  
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    GHHE 000/5333 - Biological Monitoring in Exposure Assessment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Biological monitoring of chemical exposures in the environment and workplace is essential in exposure and risk assessment. Collection, analysis, and interpretation of occupational and epidemiological data are common elements in studies of the role of exposure to potentially hazardous agents in the development of human pathologies. This course will provide both practical and theoretical information based on current literature and knowledge on (1) the conduction of exposure and biological monitoring and the limitations of these methods; (2) newly developed and emerging methods/strategies on exposure assessment and biological monitoring, (3) the interpretation of biological monitoring data, and (4) how to select the most appropriate method of monitoring.

  
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    GHHE 000/5334 - Field Research in Environmental Health and Safety (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course targets students committed to research. The course relies on guest lecturers, readings and hands on exercises to provide an overview of relevant research, as well as cultural and ethical issues in community engagement. The student will apply their gained knowledge and skills to field study in a traditional industrial or community setting. This course raises awareness and offers possible solutions to issues that may arise when interacting with the target of environmental degradation and authorities for research purposes. The theoretical foundations in cultural sensitivity, personal security, communication, organization and research along with guided practical exercises in conducting field research will empower the practitioner to successfully conduct and implement research solutions. The result is the development of cross-cultural and applied research skills to tackle real life issues.

  
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    GHHE 000/5335 - Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Fundamentals of occupational safety and ergonomics with emphasis on physiological basis of industrial safety and ergonomic programs, including hazard recognition, analysis, control, and motivational factors pertaining to industrial accident and musculoskeletal disorder prevention. The biomechanical principles underlying movement and physical activity will be highlighted.

  
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    GHHE 000/5336 - Kinesiology and Biomechanics (3 cr.)



    Description
    An applied study of human performance, including musculoskeletal actions, analysis of motor skills, and training and conditioning techniques, with application of mechanical laws and principles to basic performance patterns. The course aims at enabling the analysis of human movement anatomically and mechanically. The student will understand the different types of skeletal muscle contractions, how they affect joint motion, and comprehend the importance of following the laws of physics when improving motor skills to mitigate injury and/or enhance recovery.

  
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    GHHE 000/5337 - Ergonomics for Injury Prevention and Accommodation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Starting with the premise that the job should fit the worker, ergonomics matches workplace conditions and job demands to the worker’s ability to ensure safety and productivity, inclusive of appropriate equipment design. It is essential for reducing musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs), which cause significant suffering, loss of productivity, and cost in many workplaces. A survey of the common injuries encountered in industrial and agricultural settings due to performers resistance to anatomical and physical laws will be introduced. In this course, you will learn about the different areas of study, standards, and approaches involved in ergonomics. It will increase your ability to spot ergonomic hazards. How ergonomics processes fit into the overall occupational health and safety management system of an organization will be highlighted.

  
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    GHHE 000/5340 - Principles of Toxicokinetics, Toxicodynamics, and Chemical Classes (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to the kinetic (exposure, absorption, biotransformation, excretion) determinants of chemical bioavailability, as well as the dynamic (chemical-biological interaction) determinants of biological response and effect. A survey of the major classes of natural and manufactured chemicals exerting adverse effects are highlighted, as are the scientific advances, human genomics which have significant implications toxicology and gene-environment interactions. New experimental techniques and scientific paradigms that are based on our understanding of genes and their actions are rapidly proliferating in laboratories; thus, the students need to have a broad knowledge of metabolism, mechanisms and effects of toxicants, as well as to understand techniques that are available for their laboratory research. Thus, the material that is covered spans basics of biochemical processes that are affected by environmental agents, to molecular mechanisms of action, and to current experimental approaches in environmental sciences and toxicology.

  
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    GHHE 000/5341 - Systemic and Molecular Toxicology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of Instructor

    Description
    This course is a survey of the detrimental effects of chemical exposure on biological processes. Taking an organ- and cell-specific approach, the effects of different chemical classes, industrial and therapeutic, on biochemical, molecular, structural and functional processes will be delineated. Current approaches used to document and monitor subclinical effects and early intervention based on biomarker discovery and advances in diagnostics will be illustrated.

  
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    GHHE 000/5342 - Case Studies in Pharmaceutical Toxicology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of Instructor.

    Description
    Following an overview of toxicological principles, the adverse effects of drugs and their interactions with other drugs and/or food, or therapeutic modification by pre-existing pathology are demonstrated through interactive case studies culled from actual clinical experiences. These include near-missed tragedies, erroneous prescriptions, therapy-induced pathologies, pesticides and persistent organic chemicals masquerading as therapeutics, and industrial chemicals masquerading as hormones. This draws on the students’ knowledge of physiology, pathophysiology and toxicodynamics.

  
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    GHHE 000/5343 - Chemical Teratogenesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    permission of Instructor.

    Description
    This course explores the basic processes of embryonic and fetal development as a basis for understanding the potential for pharmaceutical agents in inducing congenital defects. From the historical cases of thalidomide and hypervitaminosis A teratogenicity to the contemporary abuse of recreational drugs and the mandated FDA regulation pertaining to antibiotics, analgesics and anticoagulants, this course will elaborate on gestation period specific limitations in therapeutic usage.

  
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    GHHE 000/5344 - Chemical Carcinogenesis (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is intended to provide students with a basic foundation in the chemical and molecular biological aspects of chemical carcinogenesis. The course relies on bring elements of chemistry and molecular biology into a framework that makes clear where current research is heading. Topics are dynamic according to current literature and provide a broad exposure to contemporary issues in environmental sciences and environmental health, specifically the role of chemicals in carcinogenesis. The course aims to analyze, interpret and explain the results of original research in diverse areas of interest, from exposure to malignancy. This course contributes towards the basic public health concept of how exposures to mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals impacts on human health.

  
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    GHHE 000/5345 - Autonomic and Autocoid Pharmacology and Toxicology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    permission of Instructor.

    Description
    The autonomic nervous system is pervasive anatomically and physiologically. In recent decades the parallel between nervous system and immune system and their interaction in homeostatic and pathological conditions have become evident and are often targets of intervention. This course reviews the homeostatic physiology and interaction of these systems, as well as their role in disease processes such as innate immunity, hypersensitivities and autoimmune disease. The emphasis is placed on chemical mediators and their activity as elaborated by the two systems and as potential therapeutic targets.

  
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    GHHE 000/5346 - Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the molecular and cell biology of immune effectors, including inflammatory mediators and cytokines as pleiotropic agents with a fundamental role in regulation of innate and adaptive immunity, growth factors in tumor development and angiogenesis, signals in neuroimmune activity and degenerative processes. The rationale and mechanisms of therapeutic targeting of the immune system in allergies, autoimmunity and transplantation will be expounded, as will the targeting of the immune system by animate and chemical etiological factors to produce hyper- and hypo-activation.

  
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    GHHE 000/5347 - Environmental Cardiopulmonary Diseases (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    permission of Instructor.

    Description
    Both as a route of systemic exposure and as a target of inhaled pathogens and chemicals, the lungs and neighboring heart are vulnerable to infections, particulate air pollutants, including anthropogenic and manufactured nanoparticles, and irritant gases and solvents. The cellular dynamics of cardiac and pulmonary architecture, resident and infiltrating immunoeffectors and chemical milieu in precipitating COPD, airway hyperreactivity, primary and secondary infections and compromised pulmonary function, hypertension, and stroke are explored through didactic and applied case studies. Molecular and pathopharmacological mechanisms underlying risk, pathogenesis and intervention/management will be explored.

  
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    GHHE 000/5348 - Nanotoxicology and Safety: From Mechanisms to Regulation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Advances in drug formulations, cosmetics and manufacturing processes has embraced the use of nanoparticles as an efficient means for targeting biological and engineering processes. Nevertheless, based on our understanding of the toxicity of particulate matter and the altered physiochemical properties of these material, there is concern over the impact of naturally occurring and manufactured nanomaterials on human and ecological health.

  
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    GHHE 000/5349 - Neurotoxicology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The nervous system has unique vulnerabilities to insult from a wide variety of etiological factors. Recently, there is a recognition that many neurodegenerative and neurological disorders may be due to a combination of risk factors and gene-environmental interactions. The unique vulnerabilities are compounded by the heterogeneousity of cellular substrates, regional specialization, a wide host of neurotransmitters and autocoid influences, as well as the influence of age, regenerative capacities, and social stressors. This interplay between chemical environment, stress, genes and cellular characteristics is approached at the molecular, and functional level, with particular attention to early detection and diagnostics.

  
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    GHHE 000/5350 - Contemporary Issues in Environment, Sustainable Development and Health (3 cr.)



    Description
    This contemporary topic course provides students with an opportunity to cover issues at the juxtaposition of environmental and health sustainability, inclusive of social engagement, new methodologies and innovative project approaches and implementation. The special topics will give students an opportunity to get involved in hands-on, practical community-based learning with off campus community development and education components This may include field experience during the Winter/Summer semesters. The course will be carried out as a combination of on-campus and off-campus activities. Off campus activities will be offered either in the form of weekend trips or longer excursions and practical community projects when offered during the Summer/Winter sessions.

  
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    GHHE 000/5351 - Environmental Health and Sustainability in the Context of Human Geography (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces students to the nature of human geography as an academic discipline and as a body of useful knowledge through a survey of some of the field’s central challenges, concepts, methods and applications. Human geography enables us to reflect upon some of the important issues in contemporary society including: cultural diversity, environmental degradation, ethnic conflicts, globalization, poverty, racism, religious differences, overpopulation, transportation ills and urban sprawl. This provides a critical interpretation of the human inhabitation of the earth and the differences between, and the similarities amongst, people and the places and landscapes they create. By examining the cultural, economic, historical and social processes that create the spatial patterns and spatial relationships that modify the natural and built environments, one appreciates the challenges and maps a course towards remediation and solutions.

  
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    GHHE 000/5352 - Geography of Health and Healthcare (3 cr.)



    Description
    The terrain is a critical determinant of human health worldwide. The social and natural environments in which we live, including housing, transportation, climate, and environmental pollution, have profound effects on health, as do the availability and accessibility of health care services. This course examines the complex geographies of health and the methods of mapping, spatial analysis and qualitative inquiry that are used to understand and analyze the inequalities in geographic distributions of health care services, access, utilization and policies. The geographic inequalities in health care worldwide; the geographic distribution and maldistribution of health services, the impacts of health service locations on access and utilization, the political economy of health care, how place environments affect health and well-being, and the provision of services to address specific kinds of health issues (infectious, chronic, environmental) in specific places will be addressed in the form of case studies.

  
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    GHHE 000/5410 - Biomarkers: Exposure, Susceptibility, Effects and Efficacy (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course surveys the discovery and utility of biochemical and molecular biological indicators, or molecular metrics, for the characterization and diagnosis of exposure to etiological factors, genetic risk, deleterious effects of animate and inanimate pathogens and the successful intervention using pharmacotherapeutics. Relying on an understanding of basic principles of physiology, cell biology, cell signaling and molecular biology, the course capitalizes on state-of-the-art literature and case studies to illustrate the use of molecular metrics in the identification of disease susceptibility, effects of toxic agents, tumor identification and the design of personalized medical intervention.

  
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    GHHE 000/5420 - Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will provide a wide array of topics in the field pharmacogenomics and explore the growing importance of pharmacogenomics in the delivery and diagnosis pertinent to personalized medicine and therapeutic management. Students will be introduced to genomic concepts in genetic testing, future drug design, study interpretation, and clinical therapeutic decision making. The course will be divided into two sections. The first part of the course will examine the application of pharmacogenomics in medicine and drug design. In the second part of the course, the student will have the opportunity to apply pharmacogenomic concepts and decision making. This will be implemented via a patient case study developed by the student, or a written paper illustrating the influence of pharmacogenomics in medicine.

  
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    GHHE 000/5430 - Integrating Biomarkers in Population‐based Research (3 cr.)



    Description
    Biomarkers are increasingly used in population-based research, with varying success. On the plus side, they tend to be quantitative and relatively objective measures of an important exposure, covariate, or intermediate marker of disease. However, their pitfalls are often poorly appreciated, and frequently ignored. This course surveys the major issues relevant to the application of biomarkers in epidemiological research, including the logistical hurdles in biospecimen collection and storage, a critical assessment of biomarker quality, the interpretation of quantitative estimates, and the resultant analytic issues that often arise in statistical analysis. After taking this course, students should understand the important issues to consider in planning a molecular epidemiological study, and be able to critically assess the literature linking biomarkers to health endpoints.

  
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    GHHE 000/5440 - Nanotechnology: Scope and Frontiers in Precision Health (3 cr.)



    Description
    This introductory Nanotechnology course will provide background information on Nano synthesis, assembly, characterization with examples that are advanced in preclinical and clinical development. Novel nanoparticles have various applications across different industries including: data storage, photonic, microelectronic, energy, pharmaceutical, biomedical, tissue engineering, cell therapeutics, and cosmetics. An interesting aspect of nanoparticles is the wide range of materials classes in which nanoparticles are useful including semiconductor, metallic, ceramic, composite and polymer nanoparticles, including the unconventional and highly interesting topic dealing with nanoparticles in cosmetics such as whitening agents, moisturizers and antiaging products. This course is designed for professionals working across disciplines and industries seeking exposure to the latest advances as it applies to the biomedical sciences and medicine. This course is designed towards advancing the advantages offered by nanotechnology in affecting early diagnostics, efficacious therapy and mitigated toxicity. It is geared towards scientists, researchers, production managers and technical managers within materials, physical science and pharmaceutical industries, pharmacy, medicine and regulatory bodies in compliance with international guidelines.

  
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    GHHE 000/5450 - Nanoformulation, Targeting and Applications (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Nanoformulation, Targeting and applications course will provide background information on the science and the art of Nanoformulations benefiting from the Nano synthesis, assembly, characterization course that preceded this course. Nanoformulation is a very promising tool to enhance efficacy and delivery of drugs. In this regard, formulation of small molecule water insoluble compounds the nanoscale could reduce the required therapeutic dosages and subsequently reduced its cell toxicity. Based on biotechnology knowledge about specific molecular targets at the certain tissues, targeted nanoformulations would provide local delivery of lipophilic small molecule targeted to specific areas and thereby preventing systemic exposure, with improved efficacy and safety. In addition, using specific coating, better pharmacokinetic and internalization of nano-compounds could be achieved. Examples that are in advanced in preclinical and clinical development with various novel drug molecules will be discussed. This course is designed for professionals working across disciplines and industries seeking exposure to the latest advances as it applies to the biomedical sciences and medicine, and the potential benefits in the public health context. Participants will gain a familiarity and working knowledge in skills and techniques relevant to nanotechnology through hands-on experience and access to state-of-the-art equipment for materials characterization techniques via in person workshop or online demonstrations.

  
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    GHHE 000/5460 - Nanomanufacturing, QC and Regulatory Affairs (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Nanomanufacturing course will discuss various aspects of GLP and GMP Nanomanufacturing, QC, analytical chemistry, sterilization techniques, clean rooms, stability studies, and various Nanofabrication techniques. Examples of Nanomanufactured products that are in advanced in preclinical and clinical development with various novel drug molecules and nanodevices will be discussed including Nanomanufacturing of polymeric, Metal Matrix Nanocomposites, and Nanomaterial Synthesis and Nanodevice Fabrication. Additionally, Societal and economic Impacts of Nanomanufacturing will be discussed. This course provides advanced knowledge in GMP large scale Nanomanufacturing toward the advancement of Nanomedicine and personalized medicines. This course is designed for professionals working across disciplines and industries seeking exposure to the latest advances as it applies to the biomedical sciences and medicine.

  
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    GHHE 000/5470 - Nano-Enabled Precision Health (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will discuss the opportunities and the challenges in developing Nanobiotechnology applications from the bench to the bed side where Nanomedicine can offer exciting prospects in diagnostics and therapeutics and their combinations in various diseases ranging from Cardiovascular, Vascular, Neurology, Inflammatory, infectious, dermatological, Ophthalmological, hematological and oncological diseases. For Nanotherapeutics, many biologically active compounds that have the desired activity in vitro never make it to the clinic because of poor solubility, malabsorption, instability, short half-life, poor safety profiles, and/or sub-optimal efficacy profiles. By encapsulating or binding such compounds with nanostructures, the fate of the compound in the body is determined by the characteristics of the nanostructure. By carefully designing and engineering the nanostructure properties we can improve target accumulation while avoiding toxicity-sensitive tissues. For some biological drugs, like non-coding RNAs, combination with a nanostructure appears even a requirement to cross the many barriers on its way to site of action. For these strategies, nanomedicine is an integral part of drug development in the treatment and early detection of various disorders. For Nano diagnostics, the small volume and extremely high surface area of nanoparticles offers attractive properties for binding specific diagnostic probes that provide functional information. For thoronstics, where diagnostics and therapeutics are combined, nanotechnology is an attractive proposition. This advanced topics in NanoMedicine will integrate practical know-how as to the impact of nanomedicine; real-world applications of Nanobiotechnology in biomedical research, therapeutics and diagnostics; and the familiarity with approaches to nanoformulation and drug-delivery; challenges of neglecting issues of nano-safety and nanoformulation efficacy; market demands, regulatory hurdles confronted by nanomedicine; familiarity with the social and economic impact of Nanobiotechnology on commercialization. This course provides opportunities for career advancement in research, production and professional practice, and frontiers in precision health.

  
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    GHHE 000/5510 - Applied Neuroscience I (3 cr.)



    Description
    Structure and Function. This course is designed primarily for those seeking a career in the medical or biomedical professions. It will provide the student with a foundation for understanding neurological dysfunction and areas of research in the neurosciences. Integration, rather than segregation, between structure and function are emphasized. This course will enable the student to be conversant in the molecular and cellular structure and function of the nervous system, with emphasis on neuroplasticity and integrative function. The organizing theme is how neurological function is influenced by disease or trauma, learning and developmental change. This is illustrated in a multidisciplinary fashion: morphology, physiology, biochemistry and clinical manifestations. Examples of pathological, occupational and environmental causes of neurological disease are highlighted through lectures and neurocognitive exercises. The convergence of neurodegenerative mechanisms and approaches used in diagnosis and understanding of impairment are stressed as essential components of devising effective therapy. Permission of Instructor.

  
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    GHHE 000/5520 - Applied Neuroscience II (3 cr.)



    Description
    Neuropathology and Neurotherapeutics. This course comprises an elaboration and discussion of the biochemistry, molecular biology and cellular neurobiology of neurotransmission and vulnerability of the nervous system to disease. Capitalizing on this understanding, the pharmacological rationale for therapeutic intervention, including stem cell and gene therapy, in the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems are discussed, as are the unique vulnerabilities of the nervous system to environmental and occupational toxicants. Permission of Instructor.

  
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    GHHE 000/5530 - Neuroimmunology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Parallels are drawn between the nervous and immune systems in terms of the heterogeneity in cellular structure and intercellular signaling mechanisms. Recent evidence has brought to light the intimate relationship of the two systems in terms of nervous system regulation of immune system function and psychoimmunology. Long considered an immunoprivileged site, the nervous system is now recognized as a major target of immune activity during neurodegenerative disease, neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity. Both neurons and glia, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, have been shown to elaborate and respond to immune mediators as well as being immune effectors in homeostasis and neurological disorders. The diagnostic and therapeutic potential of understanding these interactions will be explored through lectures, discussions of timely literature and class room engagement. permission of Instructor.

  
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    GHHE 000/5540 - Genetics and Molecular Basis of Disease (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course lays down the foundation in basic genetic concepts with the objective of understanding the hereditability and/or molecular basis of disease. Recent evidence and diagnostic procedures suggest that genetic diseases make up a large proportion of the total disease burden in both pediatric and adult populations. Today′s health care practitioner and biomedical scientist must understand the science of medical genetics and the consequences of altered genomics and proteomics. Advances in the development of new and more accurate methods of diagnosing hereditary disease have led to a greater “genetic awareness” and recognition that genetics plays a role in all areas of medicine. Using a wide spectrum of examples, it will illustrate the impact of mutations as found in thalassemias, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Huntington’s Disease as causes of disease. It will also discuss genetics as a predisposing factor, such as in the case of birth defects, breast cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Diseases, alcoholism and some autoimmune disorders. Environmentally-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes will be a particular focus of the second half of the course.

  
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    GHHE 000/5550 - Systems Neurobiology in Public Health (3 cr.)



    Description
    The systems biology approach to disease examines how the interaction between the biological entity and environmental stressors influence the components of a biological system, and how the interactions between these components result in changes in the function and behavior of that system. Systems biology integrates genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic technologies to construct models of complex biological systems and diseases. Together, these technologies allow us to interrogate and refine our knowledge of cellular processes. This course will use a systems biological perspective to detail the most recent findings that link the environmental to human neurological disease. The course will include an assessment of systems-based tools to evaluate environmental health risks, an overview of molecular pathways that are essential for cellular survival after exposure to environmental stressors, recent findings on gene-environment interactions influencing environmental agent-induced diseases, with a nervous system focus, and the development of computational methods to predict susceptibility to these environmental etiological factors. Environmental stressors relevant to human health and disease, high-throughput technologies, and biological pathways associated with compromised function are integrated with earlier coursework on molecular and cellular biology, toxicology, pathology, and computational biology.

  
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    GHHE 000/6100 - Contemporary Challenges in Global Health I (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course deals with contemporary and timely issues relevant to global health, particularly in Egypt, MENA and Africa. These include, and are not limited to, poverty, hunger, malnutrition, stunted growth, sex inequality, maternal and child health. Relying on the instructor and student interest, the course integrates science, engineering, medicine, the social and behavioral sciences, and policy to provide a comprehensive picture of the subject matter, aligned with the Sustainability Developmental Goals (SDG) of 2030.

  
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    GHHE 000/6110 - Global Challenges in Environmental Medicine (3 cr.)



    Description
    Environmental impact on human health with the development of what often reaches epidemic proportions of concern is not limited to the interaction between an etiological factor and the individual. In fact, what this environment becomes is often determined by human behavior. In a global community, it has become a priority in public health prevention and communication. In an interdependent environment, questions of water and air quality have political and social ramifications, with human health being the victim. The efforts to increase agricultural yields through pesticide and synthetic fertilizer use and chronic illness are no longer issues confined to a village or a limited region. The race for prosperity through industrial development and adoption of the superficial trappings of prosperity are not without their medical consequences. Through the use of case studies, the interplay between culture, geopolitics, ecology and medicine, are explored: from Minamata Bay to the Hudson River to the Faroe Islands; the Amazon to Toms River, New Jersey; the sands of Arabia to Los Angeles; from acid rain to nanoparticles; from the Nile to bottled water.

  
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    GHHE 000/6120 - Leadership and Professional Development for Public Health Professionals (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to introduce the skills, concepts and interactions that are critical for the development and enhancement of leadership in the health care workplace. The lectures, discussions and exercises are targeted to physicians, pharmacists, clinical diagnosticians, nurses, biomedical researchers and industrial professionals. Guests and video topics will supplement the course work. The course requires student participation and student presentations.

  
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    GHHE 000/6130 - Current Issues in Public Health Outcomes (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course focuses on timely and contemporary issue in public health outcomes research. It may include such topics as bioinformatics, regulatory issues, recent discoveries and/or strategies in disease diagnosis, issues of public health and disease prevention based on breakthroughs, translational research, recent drug discovery and or diagnostic tools and the impact of genomics. This course requirement may also be satisfied with courses numbered 600 or higher in other related disciplines depending on the student’s interest and background. Other substitutions from other programs must be approved by the program director.

  
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    GHHE 000/6140 - Evidence-Based Medicine (3 cr.)



    Description
    In the age of pharmacogenomics and global health care, it has become evident that the traditional paradigm in medical practice and therapeutics is no longer applicable. Scientific evidence has demonstrated that the diversity in our genetic profiles, diet, nutrition, cultural practices, and religious belief impact on our ability to deliver effective therapy, communicate risk of disease, implement preventative measures and predict the efficiency of health outcomes. Through case studies, these convergent issues are discussed.

  
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    GHHE 000/6180 - Microbiology and Infectious Disease (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is the study of methods used for collection, transport, processing, identification and reporting of bacteria from specimens taken from the human body. Students will be shown what is involved in determining the significance of different organisms in various clinical specimens and disease states. The principles of infection control will also be discussed. Students will be taught how to analyze and record laboratory data, comply with all safety procedures and recognize the limitations of a diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Students will also observe, practice and establish professional behaviors necessary to be a successful clinical laboratory scientist.

  
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    GHHE 000/6190 - Immune System in Health and Disease (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course in immunology is designed to provide a foundation on the essential mechanisms involved in the development of target-specific defenses. The cells, processes, and chemical mediators participating in the immune response, and the development of immunological memory will be discussed. The reasoning behind medical practices of prophylaxis through vaccination, immunesuppression, transplantation and diagnostic utility of the immune system will also be discussed. The immune system as a target and effector of disease will be illustrated through discussion of immunodeficiency, hypersensitivity responses, and autoimmunity. Finally, intervention in immune-based disorders will be illustrated.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/6210 - Public Health Informatics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field based on clinical medicine, mathematics, computer systems science and social sciences. Health informatics has been developed on this foundation to emerge as a separate scientific field with its own scientific issues and methods. It is of fundamental importance for effective information management within health and medical care, and for improving the quality of care and patient safety. Studies within health informatics develop knowledge about healthcare needs and the needs of patients/citizens for effective, appropriate information and knowledge management, and how its methods can be used to promote safe, knowledge-based, cost-effective, patient-centered and equal healthcare and prevention.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/6220 - Health Informatics and Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This advanced level course introduces through hand-on exercise and projects the public health professional to the principles and use of information and communication systems. The student will gain an understanding of the challenges confronted in data analytics in analyzing and delivering usable and accurate systems and solutions, while communicating information in a palatable form suited to the audience in question. The objective of the course is to give public health professionals a foundational and practical understanding of health informatics scope, and how it interfaces with diagnostic and epidemiological determinants. The student will gain a solid understanding of the fundamentals of health informatics so as to maximize the use of data sets and systems in the delivery of efficient, high quality health care.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/6230 - Health Informatics in Health Surveillance (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an overview of the concept, science, application, and significance of public health informatics as it applies to disease surveillance systems and their relationships within the broader health care system. Students will hear and discuss experience from professionals working or conducting research in the above areas. It will also explore Public Health Systems Analysis, Development and Information Management. Students will be familiarized with major data sets and repositories available for mining of public health raw data and secondary analysis, electronic medical records (EMR) management and privacy, and how information is used in decision and policy-making.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student dissertation. To be taken 11 times for credit.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/7110 - Molecular Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Agents and Resistance (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying antimicrobial therapy and the emergence of drug resistance. The application of molecular techniques to elucidate the efficacy of therapeutics and in the identification of infectious agents, as well as the emergence of resistant strains will be discussed through case studies and contemporary literature.

  
  •  

    GHHE 000/7120 - Contemporary Issues in Infectious Disease (3 cr.)



    Description
    Microbial agents are among the most adaptive organisms that precipitate diseases. Because of this rapid adaptation they pose a challenge to effective therapy. This course explores contemporary microbial challenges such as HIV, West Nile Virus, HPV, multi-drug resistant TB, malaria and MRSA. Therapeutic strategies, whether through vaccination or new drug development, will be discussed through a case study approach and reading of current literature.


Graphic Design

  
  •  

    DSGN 213/2113 - Introduction to Visual Cultures (3 cr.)



    Description
    This lecture course provides a primer in visual literacy across media, introducing students to key terms and methods for critically reading the visual world including iconology, formal analysis, art history, ideological analysis, and semiotics. Students gain fluency in understanding how images work in cultural context to communicate meaning, to express a sense of self, to convey pleasure, to sell things, and to distribute power. Questions of the effect of specific visual technologies are also engaged, particularly their impact on perception and conduct. Examples are drawn from fine art, advertising, film, popular culture, and new media.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 215/2115 - History of Graphic Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course introduces students to the conceptual and critical aspects of graphic design through the discourse of history and theory of visual communication. It addresses how international graphic design went hand in hand with social, political and technological developments around it. It is a chronological survey of graphic design through slide lectures and research.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 200/2200 - Design Foundations (3 cr.)



    Description
    This introductory studio course introduces students to the foundations of design in a cross-disciplinary environment through various media forms. Understanding the creative potential visual research holds, students undertake a continuous visual research project throughout the course. By means of lectures, group presentations, group discussions, class exercises and technical workshops, students develop their skills in the expressive use of analogue and various media as they realize several diverse design projects.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    DSGN 201/2201 - Design Principles & Practices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course encourages students to apply previously acquired knowledge of fundamental principles of graphic design to effectively communicate concepts in a visual representation that range from two-dimensional images to three-dimensional objects and site-specific installations. Through research, class exercises and critique, technical workshop, and design projects, students will learn to develop work plans and explore with cross-disciplinary expressions, production techniques, and materials in order to achieve communication goals.

  
  •  

    DSGN 202/2202 - Logo and Visual Identity Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2201  , DSGN 2115 , DSGN 2210  and    

    Description
    This course will prepare students to design logos and establish visual identities within the guidelines of brands, across a variety of media and applications.

    The course offers real client-designer experience. Students will have the chance to work with clients on real briefs and will learn to exercise and develop their visual problem solving and time management skills to meet clients’ expectations and deadlines. They will learn to handle the pressure of overlapping assignments.

  
  •  

    DSGN 210/2210 - Typography I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course is an introduction to and experimentation with different aspects of Latin and Arabic typography. It addresses letter forms and their legibility, visual organization, classification and text applications. Projects will explore the fundamentals of Latin and Arabic typography in terms of history, theory and practice.

  
  •  

    DSGN 240/2240 - Color (3 cr.)



    Description
    A series of experiences devoted to the development of the perception of color and its use as a tool for the graphic designer. The physics of color, colored light, colored pigments and the color wheel. The study of Johannes Litten’s color theory and Labert Munsell’s color solid, the psychology of color and application of its relations to different design fields. There will be an emphasis on using gouache paint and matching paint colors with digital color and printing as well as exploring digital color on the computer.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 245/2245 - Illustration (3 cr.)



    Description
    Students explore the different media of illustration for different end products in this studio course.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 250/2250 - Digital Practice I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2200  

    Description
    In this course students will be introduced to the basics of digital image making, core layout-design principles and simple animation. Students will work across multiple software applications to understand each’s strength, scope of usage and workflow to produce for both print and digital.

  
  •  

    DSGN 317/3117 - History of Advertising in the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    A course on the history of advertising in the Arab world that studies visual communication in the region from the rise of the printing press to the introduction of multinational brands.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 318/3118 - History of Arabic Calligraphy (3 cr.)



    Description
    A Slide-lecture based course that will introduce students to the history of Arabic calligraphy from the early Quran scripts, through highlights of the creative output of different Islamic dynasties until the introduction of the printing press. It will discuss the aesthetics of the calligraphic Arabic word and different stages of development of the script on paper and different media.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 303/3203 - Publication Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2201  DSGN 2115  DSGN 3220  DSGN 2250  

    Description
    The course focuses on the different formats that a printed word can appear in on different items like magazines, newspapers, books and web/digital publishing. Students are given briefs that push for exploration of the thinking process (Content, Message, Organization) the reading process (Typography and Layout of publications), and building process (Structure and Integration).

  
  •  

    DSGN 304/3204 - Packaging Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2201  DSGN 2115    and    

    Description
    Understanding shelf-life and presence, this studio course is based on designing and understanding communication graphics for packaged products. Students experiment with structures of products and the application of type, color, and image on different media like paper, plastic, nylon etc. Projects may be based on real market client briefs and/or experimental ideas.

  
  •  

    DSGN 305/3205 - Retail Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    • DSGN 2201 ,   
    • Wave   only to architecture students who have declared the Design of Interior Spaces minor.
    • Instructor approval required.


    Description
    This course is concerned with the design and user experience of a retail space. It can contain several branches of design like architecture, interior design, industrial design, advertising and graphic design.

  
  •  

    DSGN 000/3210 - Information Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites


    Description
    The information design course will focus on communicating complex information with visually appealing graphics. Participants will develop a deep understanding and broad knowledge of data visualization and pictorial language in theory and practice. They will learn how to create clear and meaningful visualizations for specific topics, target groups, and applications.

    When Offered
    Once a year (Spring or Fall)
    Repeatable
    No
  
  •  

    DSGN 313/3213 - Interactive Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     DSGN 3250  

    Description
    This course provides an overview of core design principles on how to create a User Experience that includes a digital product. The students will learn about the complete design process from User-centred Research and its methods, problem definition, concept ideation, Concept Prototyping and Testing, User Interface Design to presentation and documentation of such a project. In specific this course focuses on how to create Mobile Applications using most relevant application for prototyping.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    DSGN 320/3220 - Typography II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     DSGN 2250   

    Description
    This studio course covers the fundamentals of type, its characteristics, vocabulary, and terminology, as well as creative uses of type and how it is integrated into successful Latin and Arabic designs. It will introduce students to the history and current practice of typography in all areas of communication design: from editorial design to advanced information graphics and screen-based interactive media.

    The course contains a combination of projects, class assignments, and presentations that focus on refining students’ abilities to understand and use fonts and typesetting software to create and analyse typographic prototypes for print, screen, and three-dimensional design. Students will develop an understanding of the interrelationship between text, content, and audience in context and functions, considering coordination factors, visual hierarchy, speed, clarity, print systems, colour media, and materials.

  
  •  

    DSGN 330/3230 - Type Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course will cover the study and design of Arabic typefaces including Arabic type design, its aesthetics, and functional strengths, as well as introduce students to the rules of Arabic calligraphy. Students will learn how to adapt their Arabic type designs to the needs of their communities and as means through which their ideas are communicated.

  
  •  

    DSGN 335/3235 - Animation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course is a basic animation course where students will be introduced to different animation techniques, principles and concepts. Students will learn traditional animation, stop-motion animation, and Digital Animation with Adobe After effects.

    They will learn how to create a professional workflow by using Xsheet, keyframes, in between, passing positions, timeline and digital compositing.

  
  •  

    DSGN 350/3250 - Digital Practices II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    In this course students will receive advanced level instructions using software for layout and digital image making. The students will work on multiple image formats producing digital and print outcome. The learning outcome will support the execution and production of their creative work. This course will work across multiple computer design applications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    DSGN 360/3260 - Photography for Designers (3 cr.)



    Description
    How to write a photography brief, what is a product shot, how to cast the right model for your concept, food styling and photography, and working with different photographers. How and when to work with photo banks. Students will learn how to work as designers with different specialized photographers and understand the different needs of each photo assignment.

  
  •  

    DSGN 365/3265 - Advertising and Branding (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    A theory and practice course on the world of art direction for advertising. Students will be exposed to classic advertising concepts like total branding and new ones like CRM and activation. The course is studio based and might include real market briefs or experimental ones.

  
  •  

    DSGN 000/3270 - Selected Topics in Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of Instructor

    Description
    This course is an in-depth examination of specific topics in Design determined by the special interests and expertise of the faculty. This course may be repeated or taken concurrently when course content is different.

  
  •  

    DSGN 400/4200 - Design field practices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of all Major Courses.

    Description
    This course exposes students to different design communities around the world. It is field research based. It will introduce students to new and emerging design practices and methodologies while building their international design network by connecting them to design events, professionals and students in different countries.

  
  •  

    DSGN 410/4210 - Portfolio (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of all major courses.

    Description
    This course helps students create and promote their image in the market through discussions on career pathways. It will prepare students for the professional world guiding them on how to design a digital and printed portfolio, a resume and a personal corporate identity.

  
  •  

    DSGN 420/4220 - Production for Designers (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2201  DSGN 2115  DSGN 2210  DSGN 2250  

    Description
    Design production is explored in all its phases and aspects in this course. From preparing files for different design products to color separation and advanced techniques in printing. Students will be exposed to different highlights in the history of printing and will be acquainted with printing terminology, and the visual and tactile aspects of paper, printing and binding.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 469/4269 - Senior Project Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    1. Completion of all 2000 and 3000 level of concentration courses.
    2. Completion of at least four studio courses.
    3. Completion of at least two technical courses (Senior Standing).


    Description
    An independent research with a topic approved by the department. Students are requested to work independently and submit a comprehensive paper on their chosen topic.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 470/4270 - Senior Project Practice (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Independent design project as a continuation of researched topics approved previously by the department. Visiting critics will be invited to review as assess the final project.
     

  
  •  

    DSGN 000/4302 - Independent Study (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Under the guidance of a faculty member, the student conducts research or a design project on a specific topic. The student will present his/her results by submitting the research paper and/or design project determined by the supervisor.

  
  •  

    DSGN 315/5115 - History of Graphic Design in the Arab world (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSGN 2115  

    Description
    Exploring a relatively new field in the region, this course explores the history of graphic design in the Arab world by looking at publication design, political posters, children’s books and commercial design that have been instrumental in the development of social and political ideas in the region. The course presents to students a thorough review on the work of particular time periods and designers in the Arab world shedding light on the origins of printing and typography, Islamic manuscripts design, Arabic calligraphy and its revival, Modern art and its impact in design, visual identity and conceptual images, postmodern design and the digital revolution.


History

  
  •  

    HIST 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students.

  
  •  

    HIST 110/1101 - World Cultures (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the development and diffusion of culture throughout the world from the great ancient civilizations to the present. The focus will be on making connections across time and space and developing a deeper understanding of the human community in all its aspects: political, social, economic, cultural and environmental.

  
  •  

    HIST 111/1102 - Big History for Freshmen (3 cr.)



    Description
    A study of the earth, the universe and human civilizations that tries to understand how human beings are connected to their environments and the billions of years of historical evolution that preceded their appearance on the planet. Beginning with big bang cosmology and continuing all the way through to the future, it is an attempt to put everything - and everyone - into perspective.

  
  •  

    HIST 122/1103 - Words That Made History: Great Speeches of the 20th Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    Readings and recordings of historic speeches. Studies the lives of the speakers, the contexts in which the speeches were delivered, the rhetoric of the speeches, and the impact the speeches had, both on events and on the English language.

  
  •  

    HIST 123/1201 - Family History in the Modern Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    Focuses on research and fieldwork. Acquaints students with interview techniques and methods in oral and family history. By integrating their own family stories into various conceptual and chronological frameworks, students will discover how history relates to them.

  
  •  

    HIST 209/2019 - Introduction to American Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to key events and texts in the history and culture of the United States. Using films, literature and historical texts, the course will examine American culture within a historical context.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 299/2096 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Global Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 299/2097 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Arab World Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.
     

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 299/2099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Humanities (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 207/2104 - World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    The development of human society from 11,000 BCE to the present. Using archaeology, anthropology, ethno-biology and traditional history, this course examines the civilizations of Polynesia, China, India, Africa, Meso-America, South America, the United States, Europe and the Middle East in order to explain why some societies today are politically, economically and technologically more powerful than others.

  
  •  

    HIST 211/2202 - History In The Making (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers introductory history topics, each taught in a separate section. Topics focus on major historical events or movements and will be traced through contemporary literary or visual documentary records and representations of those closely involved. Topics will also examine the way interpretation of such materials may alter over time. Topics will change according to instructor and students should consult current course schedules.

  
  •  

    HIST 246/2203 - Survey of Arab History (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents the history of the Arabic-speaking Middle East from pre-Islamic times to the modern era, with emphasis on the principal political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments and their relevance to the contemporary Middle East. The course introduces students to historical methodology and different interpretive approaches. It attempts to foster a critical attitude toward sources and provides a context in which students can apply skills and concepts acquired in other.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 247/2204 - The Making of the Modern Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    A historical tour of how we got where we are today. The course starts with the late pre-modern Arab world and Ottoman empire, and moves through various forms of threat, influence, change, and modernization to the present. Events in the Arab world are examined in their wider, global context.

  
  •  

    HIST 000/2300 - Precolonial Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will offer a broad overview of African history from the development of early human societies to the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade at the start of the 19th century. Its main goal is to introduce students to the conceptual resources and methodological tools needed to understand a range of different African societies, including hunters and gathers, pastoralists, land-based empires, and complex states built through long distance trade and slavery. In addition to these broad systemic and structural themes, this course endeavors to discover the experiences of individual Africans before the entrenchment of European colonial powers to see what their lives in a precolonial African context can tell us about our own. Finally, this course aims to introduce students to some of the most important historiographical debates that have taken place since 1945 about precolonial African histories to enable students to make their own arguments about the precolonial African past.

    Repeatable
    Yes, in case a student fails the first time taken.
  
  •  

    HIST 250/2301 - Colonial and Postcolonial Africa



    Description
    This course will examine the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the eve of the European colonization to the present day. In combining a thematic and chronological approach students will discover the complex history of various people and regions in Africa during this period. Topics range from the imperial scramble to colonize Africa to the integration of African societies into the colonial and global economy; from Western perceptions of Africa and Africans to the social, political and economical impacts of colonial policies; and from Africans’ struggles for freedom during decolonization to Africa’s post independence experience.
     

  
  •  

    HIST 203/2401 - Western Civilization from Antiquity to Medieval Europe (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the history of western society from ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages with emphasis on the ideas and institutions that led to the growth and expansion of European civilization.

 

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