Jul 23, 2024  
2021-2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Sociology

  
  • SOC 460/4560 - Development Studies Seminar (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    12 credit hours of social science.

    Description
    Interdisciplinary and comparative analysis of development as a process and as a historical phenomenon. Critical evaluation of economic, political, social, and cultural technological and managerial factors that structure developmental change.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   ,  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information



Sociology-Anthropology

  
  • SOC/ANTH 507/5200 - Introduction to Migration and Refugee Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing or advanced undergraduate standing and permission of instructor.

    Description
    Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches in history, political science, sociology, economics and psychology, this introductory course examines the causes and consequences of population movements, and provides basic background , terminology and concepts for further studies in this field. It offers an overview of migrants’ trajectories across national boundaries, analyzes migrants’ integration and their transformative impact on as well as contribution to host societies. It examines the networks of relations migrants may maintain with their home countries. It also looks at the role of policies and practices of the humanitarian regime in shaping the experience and addressing the challenges faced by refugees, asylum seekers, and returnees.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 500/5201 - Classical Social Thought (3 cr.)



    Description
    An in-depth examination of classical sociological and anthropological theories of culture and society.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 501/5202 - Contemporary Social Thought (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    An in-depth examination fo contemporary sociological and anthropological theories of culture and society.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 505/5203 - Ethnographic Fieldwork (3 cr.)



    Description
    Techniques of participant observation, non-participant observation, and in-depth interviewing used in anthropology and ethnomethodology. Issues include problems of access, grounded theory and ethical issues. Students will normally carry out a fieldwork project for the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 506/5204 - The Magic of Numbers: Reading and Working with Numbers (3 cr.)



    Description
    A critical analysis of how to read numbers and statistics, their diverse meanings and effects. The seminar will also integrate basic knowledge about working with numbers and quantitative methods.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    If a students student takes SOC/ANTH 5203  then SOC-ANTH 5204 serves as an elective.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 510/5210 - Selected Topics in Sociology-Anthropology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics to be chosen according to specific interest, such as: work and precarity; affect; infrastructure; time and temporality; sociology of knowledge, among others.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    There can be different sections of the same course if the topics of the course change and are different.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 515/5215 - Relations: Kin, Friends and Neighors (3 cr.)



    Description
    Critical exploration of how relations are assembled and how they matter in contemporary lifeworlds. Special focus on how mobility, precarity, the anthropocene and neoliberal governance affect the ways humans and non-humans generate and break connections and ties.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 520/5220 - Gender and Sexuality (3 cr.)



    Description
    How sex roles and gender are socially constructed in cross-cultural perspectives: special emphasis on the impact of social-cultural change on gender relations.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 525/5225 - The Sacred and the Profane: Religion and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores a recurring theme in sociology and anthropology - the relationship between religion and society. Central to the investigations is a questioning of the role of religion in the creation of the modern world and the place of religion in modernity. Students will gain an understanding of the manner in which theorists attribute to religion a role in the formation of essential aspects of the modern world - capitalism, the nation-state, citizenship and science, and revisit the relationship between religion and contemporary society that escape the secularization paradigm. 

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 530/5230 - Theorizing the State (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers a critical reading of the concept of the state, particularly in relation to governance and power, regulation of subjects and citizens, discourses and practices of normalization of social orders, and limits to state power.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 535/5235 - Maintaining Systems of Global Inequality (3 cr.)



    Description
    Theories of the growth of the new international division of labor and its relationship to socioeconomic change in both developed and developing societies.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 540/5240 - Revisiting the Rural (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the remaking of rural communities in relation to historical shifts in capital and state dynamics, the organization and practice of everyday life, the politics of labor and property, and the production of desire and subjectivity.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 545/5245 - The City: The Making and Unmaking of Urban Lifeworlds (3 cr.)



    Description
    Critical readings about cities as spatio-temporal constellations both historically and in the contemporary world.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 555/5255 - Care, Well-Being and Decent Life (3 cr.)



    Description
    Critical examination of sensibilities and practices about decent life, care and well-being that are intimately tied to precarization of lives, displacement and mobility, and shifts in political subjectivities.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 565/5265 - Ethnicity, Identity and Nationalism (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the factors that contribute to modern nationalism or contradict it. Such factors include ethnic and other forms of identity such as those constructed around the notions of race, language, and religion. The approach to the imagined community is both cultural, dealing with identity formation and maintenance, and social, stressing processes and social groups.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 570/5270 - Environments, Ecologies and the Anthropocene (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course critically examines life in the anthropocene through an examination of the relations and ecologies that underwrite survival in the ongoing wreckage of capitalism, climate change, and political governance.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 575/5275 - Insurgent Publics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore social movements that emerge within larger social frames, and how they make claims on the cultural norms, logics of representation, policies, and politics of the public. It will critically explore how change happens within an established social imaginary.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 580/5280 - History and Memory (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an examination of the meanings and relationships between the past, memory and history in anthropological practices and debates. Specifically, it seeks an analysis of the conceptual and methodological boundaries between history production and collective memory paradigms.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 502/5285 - Reading Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    Critical readings of scholarship on Egypt with special emphasis on how contemporary debates in anthropology and sociology emerge in such engagements.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 000/5289 - Comprehensives (0 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a forum for an independent review of the main concepts of the program’s core subject areas in preparation for the comprehensive examination. The student will take a written examination at the conclusion of the course and must receive a passing grade to be successful. An oral examination may be required in addition to the written examination. The comprehensive examination may be repeated once. A student who fails the comprehensive examination a second time would be dismissed from the degree program at the end of the semester in which the examination was retaken.  

    When Offered
    When needed by students taking comprehensive exam.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 000/5295 - Reading Capital (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers a reading in the genealogies of capital in order to critically engage emergent political, economic and social forms. The course examines the nexus between events, structure, agency; Marxist conceptions of the making of histories; the variety of Marxian frameworks delineating the relation between socio-economic and political rights.

    Cross-listed
    Same as GWST 5106  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 591/5297 - Independent Study and Readings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Department approval.

    Description
    Guided individual readings and/or research on a subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member that will not be covered in a regularly offered course.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be taken only once.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 598/5298 - Thesis Writing Seminar (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   and either   ,  or the consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course serves as an intermediary phase between the research proposal and the Master’s thesis, which is designed to help students transition from fieldwork and data collection to data analysis and writing up. Students will be lead through a process of documenting, analyzing, and presenting their data in ways that emphasize faculty and peer evaluation and feedback.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • SOC/ANTH 599/5299 - Research Guidance and Thesis (no cr.)



    Description
    Consultation for students in problems related to their theses.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.


    Check course scheduling information



Sustainable Development

  
  • GREN 501/5201 - Global Changes and Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to the whole graduate program in Sustainable Development. It focuses on sustainable development and global changes - vital issues for humanity - with specific attention to the challenges in Egypt and developing countries and their transition from unsustainable to sustainable development. Topics include examples of unsustainable development and global challenges, the inter-linkages between the economy, society and environment, rethinking established ways of production and consumption, solid waste management, types of green businesses, the interrelationship between local and global challenges, economic growth, population growth, health and well-being, finding new ways of greening economics, water challenges and opportunities, renewable energy and energy efficiency, green buildings, sustainable agriculture, and climate change. The course prepares the students to face the community challenges and enables them to devise their solutions for those problem and contribute to creating a sustainable future.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 502/5202 - Engineering for a Sustainable Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid, industrial and hazardous waste generation and control, with an emphasis on sustainable engineering practices such as environmental impact assessment and performance, waste management, pollution prevention, waste minimization, cleaner production, energy recovery, recycling and reuse.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 503/5203 - Core Concepts & Applications for Social & Environmental Policy (3 cr.)



    Description
    Overview of issues and analytic approaches for social and environmental policy, including programmatic and policy responses to development challenges in the environment, health and social services, and anti-poverty programming, with an emphasis on applications and case studies of experience in the Middle East and North Africa. Application of analytic methods to understand the root causes of barriers to providing social services and protecting the environment, and potential solutions to address these challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 504/5204 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MGMT 5307  

    Description
    Innovation lies at the heart of economic growth in the modern world. Entrepreneurs with the ability and resourcefulness to establish their own business are critical to the process of innovation. Innovation is not just about starting a new business but it is also about creating and developing Innovative ways of management. Whether you are thinking of starting a new venture or developing innovative mechanisms of management in a large organization, you will need to understand Entrepreneurship and Innovation.
    This course takes students through the various aspects of starting, managing, and growing a business. Whether you want to start a new venture, a new project, or develop an innovative way of management. You will need to write a business plan? This course will teach you how to write a business plan, its benefits and how does it differ from a feasibility study.
    Opportunity identification, clear business and market definition, segmentation, and entry, building a team and creating a suitable organizational form, avoiding common pitfalls, and various strategies for starting or growing a business , are among the numerous facets of entrepreneurship covered in the course.
    Methods employed include individual and group case analysis, writing a business plan, interviews with, and talks by, entrepreneurs, and profiling of successes and failures.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and MGMT 5307  .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 505/5205 - Environment and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course uses a broad interdisciplinary approach to analyze the relationship between development and environmental degradation, the ways in which development enhances protection, and the issues of sustainable development. It covers the social movements that may emerge around the environmental concerns, and the social processes that lead to environmental risks.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 511/5211 - Water Desalination (3 cr.)



    Description
    Description of methods of water analysis and treatment. Study of the properties of water and aqueous solutions. Detailed discussion and analysis of design, maintenance, energy requirements and economics of the major processes of desalination, such as distillation, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 513/5213 - Solid and Hazardous Wastes Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid wastes - Nature, generation and collection. Local and regional management strategies including recycling and recovery of useful products, landfilling, and incineration. . Hazardous wastes - Nature, generation and collection. Risk assessment. Management strategies including source reduction, treatment, recovery, landfilling, and incineration.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   /  .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 514/5214 - Green Buildings (3 cr.)



    Description
    Climate change and the building sector, Environmental impacts of the Construction Industry, Concept of Green Buildings, different rating systems, Sustainable Sites, Energy and Atmosphere, Indoor Environmental Quality, Materials & Resources, recycling contents & VOC, Green Building for Existing Buildings, water efficiency, life cycle cost analysis, innovation on design.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5215 - Sustainability of Thermal Systems (3 cr.)



    Description
    Energy systems; energy demand; energy audit; sustainable development; energy efficiency; energy management.

    Cross-listed
    MENG 6261  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5216 - Water-Energy-Food Nexus (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course is an introduction to sustainable development and its relation to the Water-Energy-Food Nexus. This connection between three critical resources offers a conceptual tool for achieving sustainable development. It has become increasingly important to understand the interdependencies and interrelationships between the three resources. Finding new approaches to manage the nexus could contribute significantly to achieving the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This course focuses on sustainable development and global changes which are vital issues for humanity. There is specific attention paid to the challenges in developed and developing countries and their transition from unsustainable to sustainable practices.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5217 - Renewable Energy Systems (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the technical, economic and social aspects of renewable energy and its link with societies. Different renewable energy technologies (wind, solar, hydro, biomass, etc.) are investigated and the strengths and weaknesses of different policy options (feed-in tariffs, net-metering, etc.) are discussed. With a focus on solar energy, students will learn about implementing renewable energies at the local, national, and regional levels as well as exploring renewable energies through a business perspective.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5218 - Sustainable Agriculture (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces the concept of Sustainable Agriculture to sustainable development master’s students. It seeks to enable students understand how to increase food production in a way that ensures efficient usage and management of natural resources in a changing environment. The course ensures that the student acquires knowledge of practical concepts and attains skills that are paramount in tackling the most important challenges in the agricultural sector.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5219 - Selected Topics in Green Technologies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Selected topics of interest to green technologies. Topics will vary depending on contemporary tends in the field of green technologies and may reflect interdisciplinary content.

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
    Notes
    Maybe taken more than once if content changes.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5220 - Integrated Water Resources Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces the concept of integrated water resource management (IWRM) to sustainable development master’s students. Integrated Water Resources Management is a coordinated, goal-directed process which promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and related resources in order to maximize economic and social welfare in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of vital ecosystems and the environment. The course highlights the global water status and the different aspects related water analysis and treatment and explores the different properties of water and aqueous solutions. Water quality for human consumption, water quality for agriculture, water quality for industrial use will be discussed. Basic concepts of the major processes of desalination are elaborated, such as distillation, reverse osmosis, forward osmosis and electro dialysis. The course will discuss the topics both in depth and breadth with case studies when available.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 521/5221 - Marketing Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    Highlights the role of marketing as a process for creating value and managing customer relationships. The course addresses the marketing challenge of designing and implementing the best combination of marketing variables to carry out a firm’s strategy in its target markets. Further, this course seeks to develop the student’s skills in applying the analytic perspectives and concepts of marketing to such decisions as: segmentation, targeting, positioning, branding, pricing, distribution and promotion. The goal is to understand how the firm can benefit by creating and delivering value to its customers and stakeholders. The new role of marketing is emphasized including: stakeholder marketing, internal marketing, social marketing, customer relationship management and other recent trends in the market. This course takes an analytical approach to the study of marketing problems of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 522/5222 - Strategic Management of Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Innovation is regarded as a critical source of competitive advantage in an increasingly changing environment. Innovation is production or adoption, assimilation, and exploitation of a value-added novelty in economic and social spheres; renewal and enlargement of products, services, and markets; development of new methods of production; and establishment of new management systems. This course will study the theory and practice of innovation as a process and an outcome based on a comprehensive model of innovation which consists of three determinants: innovation leadership, managerial levers and business processes. The course will examine the impact of accelerating innovation on cost, product quality and marketability; organizational changes required to couple R&D with marketing and commercialization; and the managerial skills and professional expertise needed to develop a sustainable innovation practice within an organization.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and ECNG 5273  .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 523/5223 - Managing in a Dynamic Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course aims at acquainting the student with how a leader could manage an organization in a dynamic environment. The course focuses on the main functions of a manager such as planning, organizing, controlling, motivation, team building and with special emphasis on leadership. It emphasizes contemporary and applied management in a global and dynamic environment. It also aims at developing an understanding of the tasks that managers must perform to keep the organization running both effectively and efficiently. In addition, the course emphasizes the environmental constraints imposed on the Egyptian manager and attempts to explore ways of applying the principles of management in Egyptian enterprises.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 524/5224 - Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or ACCT 5211  

    Description
    It is a basic business finance course, dealing with various aspects of financial decision making. It provides an introduction to time value of money; bond and stock valuation; ratio analysis; financing decisions; capital budgeting; cost of capital; capital structure; risk and return; dividend policy; operating and financial leverage; and working capital management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 531/5231 - Policy for Sustainable Cities (3 cr.)



    Description
    Explores policy choices facing urban managers, planners, and the communities they serve with regard to putting cities on a path to sustainability. Considers how allocation of, control over, and use of key land and financial resources shapes urban development from political economy, governance and space planning perspectives. Examines participatory planning and other methods to engage urban stakeholders in management of cities as well as tools to promote adoption of green technologies in the urban housing, industrial, transport, power, water, and commercial building sectors.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 532/5232 - Greening the Built Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examines core concepts, analytic tools, and program models needed to develop the urban built environment in ways that are socially and environmentally sustainable. Gives particular attention to retrofitting and sustainability upgrades for the existing urban core, developing new communities on a sustainable model, and providing affordable options for low-income urban residents, including upgrading of informal areas as well as new developments. Explores how the spatial distribution of work and housing choices interacts with transport/transit systems, energy use, and infrastructure to shape urban sustainability outcomes.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 533/5233 - Urban Infrastructure Development for Sustainability (3 cr.)



    Description
    Considers how the development of critical infrastructure (power generation and transmission, water/wastewater, transport/transit, and waste management) can be directed toward socially and environmentally sound and economically viable models. Provides an understanding of alternative infrastructure financing, regulation, and implementation models from state provision to public-private partnerships. Explores how infrastructure network choices shape city expansion, urban quality of life, and efficiency outcomes in a dynamic urban context.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 534/5234 - Egyptian Environmental Law (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will give you a broad practical understanding of the Egyptian environmental law. The course is designed to introduce you to the fascinating variety of important environmental challenges addressed by environmental laws, the difficult policy issues surrounding environmental problems, and the legal complexities of environmental regulatory and administrative schemes. Environmental laws can be extremely complex. This course, however, gives you the foundation by covering the “fundamentals” of Egyptian environmental law. You will also develop some critical analytical and research skills (such as analyzing problems and reading statutes) that are transferable to all areas of environmental law.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5235 - Corporate Social Responsibility and NGO Partnerships (3 cr.)



    Description
    Overview of corporate social responsibility principles and applications from a developing country perspective. Issues in responsible corporate management, including addressing environmental, social, and accountability challenges. Tools for implementing and assessing corporate social responsibility programming, including mechanisms for developing effective partnerships with nonprofit organizations. Extensive use of cases from developing country experience.

    Cross-listed
    PPAD 5128  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5236 - International Migration and Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    The course provides an overview of recent literature and debates concerned with the relationships between migration and development. Migration and development are related issues. On the one hand, development is a determinant of migration. International differentials in development, mainly economic (labor-, income- and capital-related), but also political (state- and society-related), will be reviewed. These elements apply at the sending end as push factors (underemployment and unemployment; poverty; poor access to welfare; low rewards to skills; poor governance, political or civil instability, etc.) and at the receiving end as pull factors (jobs availability; higher incomes; social security; higher education; networks of previous migrants; etc.). On the other hand, migration has an impact on development. International mobility of workers and their family members can work for, or against, development. Debates on the impact of development include the following:


    Destination Countries:
    Considering whether migrant workers compete with or complement local labor? Do they reduce or increase average incomes/wages? Contribute to or drain host country welfare services?
    Origin Countries:
    While migrant remittances provide for better housing, education and health of families left behind, their impact on the local and national economy is much debated. Do they boost production or imports? Do they create employment or deter entry into the local labour market? Do they lead to sustainable patterns of development? Do they further the access to credit of local communities and migrants themselves? To what extent do migrants establish businesses as a result of their earnings abroad? To what extent do governments foster development along with migrant communities and host countries with migration-induced development through confidence building, infrastructure and skills training? Under what conditions does migration of skills result in a brain drain or a brain gain for sending countries? In both sending and receiving countries, different patterns of migration: circular, return, temporary, permanent, regular/irregular may have different impacts on development.

    Cross-listed
    Same as MRS 5103 


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 544/5244 - Cities: Structure and Dynamics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The structure of urban forms, patterns of city life, and the relationship of cities to the wider societies of which they are part.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5245 - Community Assessment and Program Evaluation (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course exposes students to concepts and methods of applied research in community psychology, specifically community assessment and program evaluation. Assessment techniques may focus on community needs and assets/ resources assessment. Students will gain knowledge and skills in program evaluation, including evaluation theories, different types of evaluation (including process, outcome, and impact), and qualitative and quantitative evaluation methodologies. There will be an emphasis on strengths-based, participatory, and empowerment-oriented approaches, as well as professional ethics.

    Cross-listed
    PSYC 5233  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5246 - Community Psychology and Systems Theory (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the core theories, values, and methodologies of community psychology and systems theory. An emphasis is placed on the ecological perspective, empowerment theory, sociocultural and cross-cultural competence, community inclusion and partnership, and ethical, reflective practice.

    Cross-listed
    PSYC 5210  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5247 - Prevention and Intervention in Communities (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills related to prevention across the lifespan, health promotion, and other types of community interventions. Students are exposed to a variety of community and preventive interventions, so as to prepare them to think about, work with, and lead community and preventive interventions in the future. The course provides training in community program development by offering opportunities for students to participate in program development, implementation, or management. Multicultural sensitivity and professional ethics are addressed.

    Cross-listed
    PSYC 5243  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5248 - Consultation to Non-Profit Organizations (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills for consultation with non-profit organizations, using a participatory and strengths-based approach. Topics include understanding the nonprofit sector, phases and theories of consultation, establishing and marketing a consultation business, and ethical and professional  competence. Nonprofit consultation often focuses on strategic planning, organization development, needs assessment, capacity and resource development, program evaluation, and fundraising.

    Cross-listed
    PSYC 5253  


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 571/5251 - Graduate Thesis Seminar I (2 cr.)



    Description
    Seminar on multi-disciplinary research topics, research methodology, thesis writing, and presentations given by invited speakers. Speakers from different backgrounds and experiences will be invited from the involved schools as well as the international partners.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 572/5252 - Graduate Thesis Seminar II (1 cr.)



    Description
    Seminar on research plans given by students to discuss their thesis topics and the results they obtained in their works. In the case of twinning thesis, students should organize together the seminar. However, every student should provide a presentation on his/her part of the research.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 573/5253 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr. + 3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. It must be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.
     


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5281 - Sustainable Development Project Part One (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Advisor Approval.

    Description
    Students complete three courses that cover the three dimensions (social, environment and economic) of advisor-supported community-based project applying learning from the M.Sc. Program in Sustainable Development. Upon approval, students can take this course with the other two courses concurrently. Part one will focus on the analysis of the project needs and the fact findings through field visits.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5282 - Sustainable Development Project Part Two (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Advisor Approval.

    Description
    Students complete three courses that cover the three dimensions (social, environment and economic) of advisor-supported community-based project applying learning from the M.Sc. Program in Sustainable Development. Upon approval, students can take this course with the other two courses concurrently. Part two will focus on the planning of the community problem which should respect the principles of sustainable development and participatory approach.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5283 - Sustainable Development Project Part Three (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Advisor Approval.

    Description
    Students complete three courses that cover the three dimensions (social, environment and economic) of advisor-supported community-based project applying learning from the M.Sc. Program in Sustainable Development. Upon approval, students can take this course with the other two courses concurrently. Part three will focus on planning the action plan for implementing the planned solutions and validating the implementation with the identified stakeholders in the field.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • GREN 000/5910 - Independent Study in Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers for students the change to study beyond the regular course offerings. Guided reading for research and discussions based on a subject of mutual interest to the student and the responsible faculty member. The student demonstrates his/her achievement by submitting deliverables according to the agreement with the responsible faculty and in line with the course load of a graduate course.


    Check course scheduling information



Teaching & Learning

  
  • TEAL 000/5201 - Fundamentals of Curriculum Design, Theory, & Practice (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     Admission to program

    Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive orientation to curriculum theory from both historical and contemporary contexts and as it applies to practice in design. Students will understand the foundations of the field through a global survey of curriculum theorists. Using contemporary and global understandings of curriculum as applied in governmental educational systems, students will also learn about strategies and best practices in curriculum development. Specific attention will be given to principles of curriculum design for all levels of student learning.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5202 - Learning Theory & Educational Psychology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5201  

    Description
    This course examines educational practice from cognitive, linguistic, developmental, and psychological perspectives. Students will understand various aspects of human learning with particular attention to the ways these aspects are affected by contemporary and evidence-based classroom practices.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5203 - Social & Political Theories of Educational Practice (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5202  

    Description
    This course will use social and political theories of education to examine contemporary educational practice. This course is intended to provide pre-service or in-service teachers with strong foundations of advocacy for children and youth. The course also provides teachers with tools to distinguish evidence-based practices in education from politically- or socially-motivated practices.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5204 - Assessment of Student Learning (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5203  

    Description
    Students will learn theories, strategies, and approaches to develop and implement formative and summative evaluations of student learning to assess student knowledge, skill, and/or disposition in multiple contexts. Particular attention will be placed on design of assessments as they relate to particular educational objectives. Assessment and evaluation theory will also be covered in depth.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5205 - Differentiation of Instruction for Diverse Learners (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5204  

    Description
    This course provides theory, evidence, and tools for the implementation of differentiated instruction across all content areas and grade levels. In particular, it provides students with a comprehensive understanding of ability and disability, particularly in educational contexts. Both school- and classroom-based strategies will be covered.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5206 - Problem-based Instructional Models (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5205  

    Description
    In order to provide students with a solid foundation of instructional practices that can be implemented at any age level or content area, this course provides theory, strategy, and evidence on various instructional models that put problem-solving, creativity, and design at the center of student learning activity. Evidence-based approaches will be covered in depth to provide students with a strong working knowledge of pedagogical methodologies.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5207 - Promoting Independent & Lifelong Learners (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5206  

    Description
    This course provides strategies, theory, and evidence on practices and educational environments that encourage independent and lifelong learning. Rather than teaching for simplistic learning objectives, ultimately students should be engaged by their teachers such that they develop curiosity and habits of reading and investigation.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5208 - Teaching Capstone (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5207  

    Description
    This course is a practicum, whereby students will connect theory to practice through demonstrations of teaching skill in real-life situations, either in their own schools or in laboratory school settings.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • TEAL 000/5209 - Teaching Portfolio (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    TEAL 5208  

    Description
    This course is the culmination of the program, which puts into direct practice all program knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Students will be required to demonstrate competency in practice as teachers through multiple applied activities, documented through the e-portfolio and video illustrations.


    Check course scheduling information



Theatre

  
  • THTR 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
     

    A course that addresses broad intellectual concerns and is accessible to students from any major or class level.  The course is offered as part of the Freshman Level of the Core Curriculum.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 130/1101 - The World of the Theatre (3 cr.)



    Description
    An initiation into the world of the theatre with the aim of developing the critical skills of an informed and perceptive audience member through the reading of plays, critical articles, and the attendance of stage performances and film versions of plays.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 125/1200 - Acting for Non-Majors (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the art and technique of acting for the non-major student, utilizing training games and exercises to present the student with a general overview of the acting process, while also providing experiences and techniques beneficial to basic human communication.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    May not be used for departmental credit by theatre majors or minors.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 203/1201 - Theatre in the Making (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to theatre as a collective art form by exploring all of its components and participants: from playwright to actor, from director to designers, from producing team to audience.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1010  

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 225/2201 - Acting I (3 cr.)



    Description
    A basic course in the fundamentals of acting, designed for majors, minors, and those with some previous experience. In-class exercises and improvisations, combined with rehearsed scenes and monologues from simple realistic texts, will help students gain proficiency in objective/obstacles, creation of a character, basic voice and breath control, and basic body alignment and awareness.

    Cross-listed
    Same as FILM 2201 
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring, and occasionally in the summer.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 226/2211 - Acting in Arabic I (3 cr.)



    Description
    The art and craft of acting as a systematic process applied to the specific demands of Arabic Drama. Scene work and monologues from modern and contemporary Arabic plays.

    Cross-listed
    Same as FILM 2211 
    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring, and occasionally in the summer.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 230/2301 - Play Analysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    The development of the art of reading a play through detailed examination of its dramatic structure and in-depth analysis of its text. Both Western and Arabic plays will be examined.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 204/2401 - Introduction to Technical Theatre (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the theories, techniques, tools, and materials of technical theatre. Technical areas to be covered include organization, architecture, shops, stage equipment, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, technical direction, and stage management.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Students will be expected to work on one of the technical crews for a major theatre department production concurrently with the course.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 240/2601 - Production Practicum (1 cr. per production)



    Prerequisites
    THTR 1201  

    Description
    A course for any student who wishes to gain academic credit for significant contribution to departmental theatre productions in one of the following area: a. Scenery, b. Costume, c. Props, d. Lighting, e. Sound; or f. Run Crew. Minimum of 50 hours of practical work are required. Students work under direct supervision of a theatre faculty member. May be repeated twice for credit.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 242/2603 - Rehearsal and Performance Practicum (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor

    Description
    A course for any student who wishes to gain academic credit for significant contribution to departmental theatre productions in one of the following areas: a. Performance or b. Stage Management. Students work under direct supervision of a theatre faculty member. Registration by permission of the faculty member in charge of the specific activity and/or by audition.

    Repeatable
    May be repeated twice.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 370/3099 - Selected Topics in Theatre (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Description
    In-depth examination of specific topics in theatre determined by the special interests and expertise of the faculty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 000/3103 - Drama in Context I: Greeks to English Renaissance (3 cr.)



    Description
    A study of dramatic literature and theatre practice in its social context from 5th century BC Athens to the closing of the English theatres in 1642. Plays are studied for their literary value and as points of departure for exploration of performance and design practices. The course examines ways in which theatre and the societies which produce its serve to reflect one another.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 000/3104 - Drama in Context II: Italian Renaissance to Modern (3 cr.)



    Description
    Renaissance Italy, 17th century France and England, and the European Enlightenment and early Industrial Age. Plays are studied for their literary value and as points of departure for exploration of performance and design practices. The course examines ways in which theatre and the societies which produce it serve to reflect one another.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 227/3201 - Acting II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Students will build upon their knowledge of the acting process through focus upon a more rigorous examination of the development of a character, utilizing challenging scenes from early modern playwrights such as Chekhov, Pinter, Albee and Williams. Additionally, vocal and body work will continue through exploration of standard speech production, kinesthetic and relaxation techniques.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 327/3203 - Special Topics in Acting (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    In-depth examination and implementation of specialized acting and performance skills and techniques. Focus of study to be determined by the special interests and expertise of the faculty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 325/3205 - Acting Styles (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    An advanced acting class, offering exploration and techniques in varied acting styles, including but not limited to Greek/Roman, Medieval, Restoration, Neo-Classicism, Romantism, Farce, Expressionism and Absurdism. Vocal work will be examined through ensemble patterns, shared speech and period movement. Content of course to be determined by the interests and expertise of the faculty.

    When Offered
    Offered once every other year.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 000/3207 - Movement for the Stage (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    THTR 2201  or THTR 2211  

    Description
    Movement for the Stage focuses on increasing the strength, flexibility, endurance, and movement vocabulary of the actors physical instrument, its presence in space, and the use of it as a tool for theatrical storytelling.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 326/3211 - Acting in Arabic II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    A continuation on a more advanced level of the work started in Acting in Arabic I, applied to a wider range culminating in the presentation of a class term project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 328/3301 - Directing I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The fundamental directorial controls, as well as theoretical and practical training, leading to the production of single scenes.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated once for credit as content changes.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 324/3401 - Design for the Theatre (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    A study of the principles of visual design and their application for the theatre. Play analysis that focuses on visual and spatial design requirements. Includes scenery, costumes, and lighting. Involves drawing, painting, model making, and research into period styles.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 000/3403 - Make Up for the Theatre (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to theatrical make up techniques for the actor. Students will explore the process of developing character through the manipulation and transformation of their facial characteristics with makeup. Projects will focus primarily on two dimensional techniques, but will introduce latex and other three dimensional techniques and will cover a wide range of character and special effects applications.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally in winter or summer session.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  
  • THTR 361/3503 - Playwriting II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: . 

    Description
    A workshop in which students develop the scenario they have produced in Playwriting I into a short one-act play to be performed as a staged-reading.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 340/3601 - Advanced Theatre Practicum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   and consent of instructor.

    Description
    Advanced, specialized, and intensive participation in theatre production activities. Assignments made in major supervisory positions in consultation with and under the supervision of a theatre faculty member. Technical production areas of scenery, costumes, props, lighting, sound, or stage management.

    When Offered
    Offered fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    Repeatable for credit. No maximum.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 344/3603 - Design Practicum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Selection by application and interview.

    Description
    A course for students who wish to learn about theatre design through participation in designing a departmental theatre production. Students selected through application and interview process.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    Repeatable for credit.
    Notes
    Selected students will form a design team that will be responsible for designing scenery, props, costumes, lighting, and sound for a major production.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 402/4000 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Minimum B average required.

    Description
    In exceptional circumstances, some senior majors may arrange, with departmental approval, to study beyond the regular course offerings.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 461/4103 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism (3 cr.)



    Description
    An exploration of the various and conflicting perceptions of the nature and function of drama through the study of major works of dramatic theory and criticism from the Greeks to the present.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate springs.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 471/4110 - Theatrical and Dramatic Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    A critical exploration of the particular challenges surrounding a number of “translations” of drama, with specific focus on the nature of dramatic language, the adaptability and contemporary value of myth, cultural and historical barriers and the means of challenging them, the shortcomings and advantages of dramaturgy, and the inevitable concrete requirements of performance.

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


  
  • THTR 428/4301 - Directing II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and completion of all 200-level requirements.

    Description
    Advanced theoretical and practical, production-oriented training in play direction culminating in the presentation of a directorial project.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.


    Check course scheduling information


 

Page: 1 <- Back 1015 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25