Jan 20, 2022  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Construction Engineering

  
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    CENG 592/5292 - Advanced Topics in Construction Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    Topics to be chosen every year according to specific interests.

    Repeatable
    May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.
  
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    CENG 611/6211 - Structural Stability (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Fundamental concepts in elastic stability: equilibrium equations, stability criteria and post-buckling behavior. Various aspects of instability: buckling of columns, frames, arches, plates and shells, dynamic buckling, nonlinear problems, torsion and flexural buckling. Approximate methods for stability analysis. Interactive buckling phenomena in light metallic constructions.

  
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    CENG 612/6212 - Structural Dynamics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Dynamics of discretized systems; one degree of freedom systems; free and forced vibration; response to base excitation, stochastic excitation, impact. Lumped - mass multidegree systems: free and forced vibration of two degrees of freedom systems in response to harmonic and step functions, pulses, and general type. Matrix formulation for multiple degrees of freedom, natural frequencies, Lagrange equations, modal analysis. Flexural vibrations of beams, plates and frames. Dynamic response to impact and moving loads.

  
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    CENG 613/6213 - Earthquake Engineering and Seismic Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Earthquake ground motion and response spectra, dynamic response of buildings and structures to seismic loads, lateral load resisting systems, seismic design considerations, drift and lateral stability, code considerations, design of reinforced concrete, masonry and steel structures, design of nonstructural systems, structures with seismic mitigation systems: active and passive damping and base isolation.

  
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    CENG 631/6222 - Specialty Materials for Construction (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
     

    Review of applied mechanics of materials. Asphalt concrete; components, conventional and SUPERPAV characterization of asphalts, asphalt concrete conventional and SUPERPAV mix design, mechanistic and environmental performance. Special types of concrete; e.g. high strength, high durability, corrosion resistant, self compact. Non-conventional construction materials.


  
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    CENG 679/6223 - Preserving, Repair and Sustainability of Structures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or Equivalent Course/Experience

    Description
     

    Protection of masonry, wood, concrete and steel and composite structures. Preserving historic structures. Condition assessment using innovative techniques. Equations and formulae for condition assessment with lab field visits. Complex repair of structures subjected to moderate to sever damage. Durability and sustainability of strategic structures. Repair life cycle cost.

  
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    CENG 632/6231 - Highways Pavement Systems and Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
     

    Pavement systems, structures and design factors. Flexible pavements; materials characterization, traffic loading and volume, stresses and strains models, sensitivity analysis, pavement performance, reliability, design criteria, traditional and contemporary methods of design. Rigid pavements; stresses and deflections in rigid pavements due to curling, loading and frication, design criteria, methods of design, design of joints. Design project.


  
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    CENG 699/6290 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.
     

  
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    CENG 680/6291 - Independent Study in Structural and Material Engineering (3 cr. max.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of structural and material engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.
     

  
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    CENG 692/6292 - Advanced Selected Topics in Structural and Material Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.
     


Core Curriculum

  
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    CORE 110/1010 - Freshman Seminar (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Taken concurrently with   .

    Description
    This course is a cluster of distinct courses (topics may vary semester to semester) with shared goals and learning outcomes. All sections of CORE 1010 aim to introduce students to university-level academic study and the meaning and values of a liberal arts education. Through varied section topics, readings, films and other media, discussions and assignments, CORE 1010 will help students adapt and succeed in today’s university environment, as they develop their skills in critical thinking, information literacy, teamwork, and effective reading and communication. Courses focus on issues of lasting value and current relevance for students, and address questions such as “Who am I?” “What do citizenship and civic responsibility mean?” “How do I know what is true?” and “What is a good life?”

    When Offered
    Fall and Spring. Summer only for students repeating the course.
  
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    CORE 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

  
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    CORE 000/1130 - The Human Spirit (3 cr.)



    Description
    This interdisciplinary course explores the different facets of what it means to be human and how the human spirit is manifest in various human endeavors and situations. Students will discuss or debate readings in various genres, watch films, analyze various perspectives, write, and draw on their own experiences to formulate conclusions about how and why the answers to these essential and enduring questions involve complexity and multiple points of view.

  
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    CORE 000/1140 - Community Matters (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course aims to deepen students’ understanding and broaden their perspective on the issues and methods of civic and community engagement. Students will analyze the needs of various groups and develop a critical, reflective understanding of the role of context, interconnectedness, and respect of d9difference. Some sections may integrate Community Based Learning; please check prior registration.

  
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    CORE 000/2096 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Global Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and open to all students, irrespective of major.

  
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    CORE 000/2097 - Selected Topics for The Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics investigating diverse regional issues in the Arab world; open for all students irrespective of major.

  
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    CORE 000/2098 - Selected Topics on Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics investigating diverse issues relating to Egypt; open for all students irrespective of major.

  
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    CORE 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

  
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    CORE 000/2142 - Profiles in Civic Leadership and Civic Project Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    RHET 1020  

    Description
    This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine human rights, social justice, civic engagement and leadership, with a special focus on the university and the opportunities it can provide for service learning and student leadership. Students will learn about the structure and role of various types of institutions including the state, international and civil society institutions within development planning and practice, as well as fund raising and grant writing. While others work on a Civic Leader Project, MEPI students will develop their ” Civic Service Project”, required formally in their senior year.

  
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    CORE 499/4198 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Interdisciplinary seminar addressing broad current topics and concerns from a variety of intellectual and professional perspectives; open and accessible to all senior students, irrespective of major.

  
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    SEMR 111/1011 - The Human Quest: Exploring the “Big Questions” (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is an interdisciplinary survey course aimed at helping new undergraduate students acquire an attitude of engaged curiosity, a widened worldview, and enhanced self expression as they begin to discover how a university education can help them find their places in the world. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining geography, history, biology, political science, anthropology, sociology, literature, and the arts, it aims to introduce students to the process of raising and exploring life’s enduring “Big Questions,” through readings, music, debates, films, and technology, and thus they acquire some of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by a university student in the 21st century.
     

  
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    SEMR 112/1012 - “Who Am I?”: Explorations in Consciousness and Self Across the Disciplines” (3 cr.)



    Description
    Self-awareness allows us to perceive both limits and possibilities. This course will be a practical and theoretical exploration of different approaches to consciousness and the self in the sciences, psychology, philosophy and religion, among others.
     

  
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    SEMR 123/1023 - Celebrating Ideas: A Voyage Through Books, film, Art and Theater (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course aims at exposing students to a wide range of key landmarks in human intellectual and cultural development. This is achieved through reading a number of texts, each important, simulating, often groundbreaking and discussing the ideas and concepts embodied in these texts. The topics and themes raised through the readings will be further explored and enhanced through exposure not just to the written word but through film, art and theater, all modes in which humankind has been able to express its intellectual development and creative energy.
     

  
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    SEMR 199/1099 - Selected Topics in Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



  
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    SEMR 000/1110 - Creative Thinking & Problem Solving (3 cr.)



    Description
    Pathways 2 freshmen level course inter-disciplinary course taught by 5 instructors over 2 sections using a modular approach to themes and content.

    The course examines the nature of creative thinking, problem solving and innovation, across a variety of contexts and disciplines, and seeks to awaken and foster students’ creativity, as something innate in all of us. Students will participate in a variety of assignments and mini-projects over the course of the semester with both individual and group work, focusing on relevant and engaging real-life problems. The course brings a multi-disciplinary, modular approach to an examination of creativity as a 21st century skill vital for students in all fields of study.

  
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    SEMR 200/2010 - Core Seminar (3 cr.)



  
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    SEMR 299/2099 - Selected Topics in the Humanities (3 cr.)



  
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    SEMR 300/3099 - Core Seminar (3 cr.)



  
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    SEMR 410/4018 - East-West Dialogue: Cross-Cultural Perceptions and Reflections (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a unique opportunity for students at AUC to share their educational experience with students in the west. The medium for this shared experience will be videoconferences held over the Internet with university classes in the United States and other Western countries. For each videoconference, we will be reading the same texts as the students at our partner institutions. The videoconferences provide not only the medium for the shared component of this course; they also suggest its substantive theme. For, while we encounter the apparent cultural other over the Internet, we will be exploring with them the question of our relationship to the other- especially how our perceptions of the other have developed over time and how they continue to influence the political interaction between “East” and “West” today.

    Cross-listed
    Same as POLS 4018  
    Notes
    SEMR 4018  cannot be taken as a capstone class “within the major” by political science students.

  
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    SEMR 411/4028 - The Arab Spring in Arab Eyes: Perceptions and Reflections from the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    This videoconference dialogue course offers a comparative view of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution in relation to the Arab revolts that have swept the region since the beginning of 2011, in what became known as the Arab Spring. This course shall use an interdisciplinary approach to explore the social, economic, political and cultural contexts that led up to these popular uprisings. In this light, AUC will be holding videoconferences with various partner universities and institutions in order for the class to share perspectives and first-hand experiences relating to the Arab Spring with the partners. Specific readings will be assigned by AUC and the partnering universities, offering a general introduction of the countries that will be studied and a specific background with regards to the linkage these countries/geographical areas have with the Arab Spring. This is an interdisciplinary course that can be relevant to students from different backgrounds and disciplines, especially those that have an interest in contemporary Middle East issues.

  
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    SEMR 412/4038 - South-South Dialogue: Perceptions and Reflections from the Global South (3 cr.)



    Description
    This videoconference dialogue course aims at offering a comparative view of and a fresh perspective on the ‘Global South.’ The course shall use an interdisciplinary approach to explore the social, economic, political and cultural contexts of some of the countries/regions that constitute what is known today as the ‘Global South’ in an attempt to outline the commonalities as well as the differences that exist within this global conglomerate of nation-states. In this light, AUC will be holding videoconferences with various partner universities and institutions in order for the class to share perspectives and first-hand experiences relating to the themes and topics of discussion with the partners. Specific readings will be assigned by AUC and the partnering universities to have a general introduction to the countries that will be studied and a specific background on the linkage these countries/geographical areas have with the Global South as an economic and a political amalgam. This is an interdisciplinary course that can be relevant to students from different backgrounds and disciplines, especially those that have an interest in contemporary development issues.
     


Data Science

  
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    DSCI 000/1411 - Fundamentals of Data Science I (3 cr.)



    Description
    Introduction to the fundamentals of the data science domain. Fundamentals of the R programming language and related tools for usage in Data Science. Problem Solving using R. Basic statistics, data gathering, preparation, and analysis, data visualization, case studies, and some ethical issues.

  
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    DSCI 000/1412 - Fundamentals of Data Science II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 1411  

    Description
    Fundamentals of Python programming in the context of Data Science with a focus on relevant packages. Coverage of techniques for database handling, data manipulation, visualization and summarization. Study of probability basics and further statistics required for assessing sampling techniques, designing estimators, hypothesis testing and fitness tests. Focus on simulation basics, analytics, data interpretation and basic machine learning models such as regression and kNN classifiers.

  
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    DSCI 000/2411 - Data Visualization (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 1412  

    Description
    The amount and complexity of information produced in science, engineering, business, and everyday human activity is increasing at staggering rates. The course discusses visual representation methods and techniques that increase the understanding of complex data. Good visualizations not only present a visual interpretation of data, but do so by improving comprehension, communication, and decision making. In this course, you will learn how the human visual system processes and perceives images, good design practices for visualization, tools for visualization of data from a variety of fields, and programming of interactive visualizations using 3D.

  
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    DSCI 000/3411 - Fundamentals of Simulation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 1412  ,MACT 2132  and MACT 3211  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to fundamental tools in designing, conducting, and interpreting simulation experiments. Topics covered include Random number generation; Continuous, discrete, and rare event simulations. Variance reduction techniques, Bootstrap and Jacknife; Simulation; Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The course includes an applied project (a thorough application of simulation to real-world problems such as finance, statistics) using computer programming language such as R or Python).

  
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    DSCI 000/3413 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 4231  

    Description
    This course is an introduction to important topics in biological, medical, health, and environmental statistical concepts and reasoning. Topics include: Introduction to Biological data Processing and Analysis, Hypothesis testing, nonparametric tests, Logistic regression, Poisson regression, Statistical methodologies in analysis of survival data (Kaplan-Meier estimator, Cox’s proportional hazards models, time-dependent covariates, multiple failure outcomes). Typical biomedical applications, including clinical trials. The course includes an applied project using computer programming language such as R or Python.

  
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    DSCI 000/3415 - Fundamentals of Machine Learning (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 3223 

    Description
    Topics include: Support Vector Machines, Kernel PCA, Ensemble learning, bagging and boosting Vector Quantization, Mixture Modelling, and Expectation-Maximization, Introduction to Neural Networks. Case Studies: Face recognition, speech recognition, and more.

  
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    DSCI 000/4411 - Fundamentals of Data Mining (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 3415  

    Description
    Introduction to the fundamental concepts of data mining, motivation for and applications of data mining, text and web mining, and survey of techniques and models. Topics include: data pre-processing, frequent pattern mining, clustering, classification, and case studies using data sets taken from real-life applications, and use of data mining software.

  
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    DSCI 000/4412 - Introduction to Big Data Technologies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 1412  

    Description
    The course introduces Big Data problems and associated frameworks and technologies. First, the course motivates the topic using real-world big data problems. Second, it sheds light on handling big data, from data collection, to monitoring, storage, analysis and reporting. The course also includes programming models used for scalable big data analysis. It also introduces one of the most common Big Data frameworks, namely Hadoop, in addition to the Map-Reduce Programming Model. Finally, it solves sample case studies using the covered Big Data analytics tools.

  
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    DSCI 000/4413 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 2132  and MACT 3223  

    Description
    The analysis of discretely measured responses such as counts, proportions, nominal variables, ordinal variables, discrete interval variables with few values, continuous variables grouped into a small number of categories, etc. Topics include: Detection of outliers in categorical data; Inference and distributions for discrete data; Inference for contingency tables; Generalized linear models for count data; Models for binary and multinomial response (logistic regression, Poisson regression, Loglinear models); Classification and regression trees; Cluster analysis for categorical data; The course includes an applied project using computer programming language such as R or Python.

  
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    DSCI 000/4415 - Advanced Machine Learning (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 3415  

    Description
    Perceptron and multilayer neural networks, Gradient descent, Back-propagation, Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), pooling layers, CNN applications, Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN), vanishing gradient problem, case studies: object detection, and stock price estimation, GANs.

  
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    DSCI 000/4416 - Capstone l (Data Science Senior Project l) (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing

    Description
    A capstone project divided between two courses DSCI 4416 and DSCI 4417 . With the approval of the advisor, topics/data in an area of applications are selected by groups of 1 to 3 students who have common interests in the same area of application. A preliminary data examination, pre-processing, and exploratory data analysis are carried out on the selected data. Students will decide on the data science techniques, models, and methods to be used for the analysis. Students will submit a brief written proposal specifying their plan of work that they will follow in DSCI 4417 .

  
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    DSCI 000/4417 - Capstone II (Data Science Project II) (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    DSCI 4416  

    Description
    This is a continuation of DSCI 4416 , where students will implement their plan for the completion of the project. Students will develop and write well-documented computer programs to illustrate the iterative process of Data Science and business solutions are sought. The students will submit a carefully written project. The project is then submitted and presented orally to the advisors.

  
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    DSCI 000/4950 - Industrial Training (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of department chair or program director.

    Description
    This course consists of participation in a full-time or part-time internship experience, related to the student’s field of study under the supervision of both an approved internship provider and a faculty adviser. This culminating course provides practical, hands-on training in a relevant industry to enhance classroom learning and allows senior students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in their program to real-world problems.

    When Offered
    All semesters.

Economics

  
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    ECON 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course introduces the concept of economic rationality while exploring applications of this logic to historical and contemporary problems facing individuals, firms, and societies. The course will explore the fundamentally economic nature of the human condition specifically addressing issues such as scarcity, public goods, poverty and inequality, environmental conservation, underground markets, and health care.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    This course does not count as part of Economics major or minor requirements.

  
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    ECON 202/2011 - Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Fundamental economic concepts and methods of economic analysis with emphasis on microeconomic issues. Analyzes basic principles of market economics including resource allocation, opportunity cost, core elements of demand and supply, market equilibrium, elasticity, pricing, market structure, and trade exchange. Labor and capital markets, market efficiency, regulation, and social welfare implications.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ECON 201/2021 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Fundamental economic concepts and methods of economic analysis with emphasis on macroeconomic issues. Analyzes aggregate economic activity in relation to the level, stability and growth of national income. Topics analyzed include the determination and effects of national income, consumption, investment, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, and how these may be influenced by monetary, fiscal and other policies.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 215/2051 - Economic History of the Modern Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    Historical survey of the economic conditions, systems, and institutions of the Middle East with special emphasis on the period 1800-1945.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 216/2061 - Mathematics for Economists I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Algebraic methods. Calculus of a single variable. Composite functions, limits and asymptotes, continuity, simple and implicit differentiation, Taylor’s theorem, maxima and minima and points of inflection, logarithmic and exponential functions. Introduction to integral calculus. Applications to economic theory and business finance.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 218/2081 - Statistics for Economists (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The course covers descriptive and sample inferential statistical techniques, including main descriptive statistics and data sources and types. Topics include point estimation and statistical estimators’ desirable properties, hypothesis testing, correlation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Applications in Economics and Business are emphasized.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 302/3011 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    For Economics students   and ECON 3061  

    For Actuarial science students 

      and MACT 2132  or ECON 3061  

     

    For ACTS

      and MACT 2132  or ECON 3061  

    Description
    Preferences, utility theory, and derivation of consumer demand. Convergence conditions in consumer choice. Slutsky decomposition. Supply, cost structure, factor inputs, and technology. Properties of production functions including the Euler Theorem. Monopoly, duopoly (Bertrand and Cournot), oligopoly, monopolistic, and competitive markets. The extent of market entry. Labor choice, the capital asset pricing model, and technological innovation. Introduction to game theory. General equilibrium and welfare economics.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ECON 301/3021 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and (   or   ).

    Description
    This course covers aggregate economic behavior using Keynesian and Neoclassical macroeconomic analysis. Various theories of how a nation’s income, employment and price level behave under static and dynamic conditions are examined. Topics covered include: income determination, unemployment, price stability, budget deficits, balance of payments equilibrium and economic growth, in addition to the impact of fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policy on macroeconomic performance.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 303/3041 - Monetary Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    FINC 2101  plus   and   

     

    Description
    This course emphasizes the evolution of money, the payment system and the commercial banking. The role of central banks, use of monetary tools, the interaction between banking sector and financial markets in impacting domestic macroeconomic performance and the global economy. Topics include: monetary theory and policy; central banking; management of the banking system; financial regulations; and the nexus between monetary policy, financial markets and macroeconomic performance. The course combines theoretical formalization with empirical investigations.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ECON 312/3053 - Economic Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Major economic problems of developing countries. Alternative explanations of underdevelopment and theories of development. Major domestic and international aspects of development including population growth, capital accumulation and international economic relations. Sustainable development.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 000/3054 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 2021  and ECON 2011  

    Description
    The course discusses basic environmental and natural resource models and environmental policies as applied to energy, minerals, water, fisheries, pollution control, and sustainable development. It includes an Community Based Learning (CBL).

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
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    ECON 320/3055 - The Digital Economy: The Economics of New Technologies and Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    The course engages students in timely debates related to the digital economy and inclusive development, with focus on the interests and realities of developing countries and their global position amidst these deliberations. In the age of what has been coined the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’, new digital technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning are expected to infiltrate and transform all aspects of human lives and shape the future of economies. This raises important questions on challenges and opportunities associated with these technologies, and whether they are promoting equitable growth or exacerbating existing inequalities, especially in the context of developing countries.

    The course equips students to be active contributors to the developmental discourse on the digital economy, and active participants in digital entrepreneurship and innovation initiatives. Course topics include (but are not limited to) technological revolutions and developmental divides, productivity paradox, big data challenges and opportunities, the application (app) economy, and artificial intelligence and inclusion.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ECON 316/3061 - Mathematics for Economists II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 1122  or ECON 2061  

    Description
    The first part of the course is matrix algebra which covers the following: determinant, rank, matrix inverse, Cramer’s rule, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The second part discusses multivariate functions and partial derivatives as well as unconstrained and constrained optimization. Homogeneous and homothetic properties of multivariate functions are also discussed. The third part of the course is advanced integral calculus. Economic applications are emphasized throughout the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 308/3071 - Labor Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The course offers a general treatment of modern theoretical and empirical labor economics. Topics to be covered include: operation of labor markets; wage determination; firm, industry and public sector labor demand; human capital investment; race and gender employment and wage discrimination; public policy effects. The relation of labor market outcomes and attendant public policy to poverty, income distribution and economic growth is covered. (The course includes community-based learning components)
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 318/3081 - Introduction to Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   

    Description
    The course covers regression methods for analyzing data in economics, including multiple regression with indicator variables, regression with heteroskedastic  and correlated errors, hypothesis and diagnostic testing. The course emphasizes practical applications using econometrics software.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 420/4000 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor and unit head, senior standing.

    Description
    Guided reading, research, and discussion based on a subject of mutual interest to a student and faculty member.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 000/4002 - Senior Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior Standing.
    Minimum GPA Requirement may apply.

    Description
    This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct original research work, in accordance with university regulation, on a selected topic of mutual interest between the student and the faculty supervisor. Individual guidance is then provided to the student on qualitative and quantitative research methodology, with the aim of producing a high-quality, original thesis. After the submission of the thesis, the student presents a defense seminar in front of a panel of faculty members. Subsequently, the thesis is approved and finalized upon the successful incorporation of faculty comments and suggestions.

  
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    ECON 413/4012 - Feasibility Study (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 2011  and ECON 2021  

    Description
    This course develops the analytical tools and applied case study analysis to financial and economic project evaluation. Cost-benefit analysis, shadow pricing, multiple criteria for project feasibility, economic worth of investment projects, cash flow discounting, and financial and economic rates of return. Applications to real life cases including investment and development projects as well as entrepreneurship ventures and risk assessment.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
  
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    ECON 000/4013 - Behavioral Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 2011  

    Description
    The course will expose students to the science of behavioral economics. It will cover a range of topics including individual decisions, markets and public choice. Topics include extensions and shortcomings of the rational choice model and deviations from the Expected Utility Theory; Prospect theory and preference dependence; time preferences; social preferences, behavioral trust and fairness.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 310/4014 - Public Economics and Policy Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   

    Description
    This course covers analysis of public policy with special focus on Egypt and the MENA Region. It discusses issues related to market failure, equity and efficiency, public goods, tax policy and externalities. The course gives students the chance to do applied policy research in this area.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ECON 000/4015 - Applied Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 3081  

    Description
    This is an application course where students use real world examples and put into practice theories they learned in statistics and econometrics courses. It concentrates on expanding students’ experience of practical applications of key econometrics methods in the different fields of economics such as microeconomics, macroeconomics, labor, development, and program impact evaluation.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 403/4031 - International Trade (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    International Trade Theory: Mercantilist Theory, comparative costs, and post- Ricardian theories including economies of scale and imperfect competition. Protection Theory; Effective Protection. Terms of trade, national income and the balance of payments. Fluctuations in trade. Foreign exchange markets, exchange rates and adjustment in the balance of payments. International resource movements.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 404/4041 - Financial Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     ,    and   .

    Description
    This course provides a rigorous introduction to modern financial economics. It is designed to equip students with theoretical tools and practical case studies necessary to understand the dynamics of financial markets and their interaction with other spheres of the economy including asset pricing, risk management, and financial regulation schemes.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 000/4050 - CopyrightX: The Economics of Copyright and Creativity (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Minimum junior standing.

    Description
    The course examines ways in which the copyright system seeks to stimulate and regulate creative expression, impacting creative industries and pertinent business models. The course also critically reviews the main theories of copyright, with emphasis on the economics of knowledge production in varying contexts. Students engage with world issues and debates related to copyright and creativity, with an eye to the interests of developing countries and their position in global debates. A central question raised in the course is whether and how copyright legislation should be reformed to address new technologies, incentivize novel business models and help bridge the developmental divide. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles of copyright and how it affects creativity and innovation in a wide variety of artistic and technical fields. While there will be reference to US law in the recorded video lectures, supplementary class discussions and reading materials will provide students with understandings of the legal copyright systems in Egypt and other countries.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 415/4051 - Seminar on Economic Development and Policy in the Middle East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 2021  

    Description
    This course explores the application of key concepts relating to economic development and policy in the Middle East and North Africa. The focus is on evidence-based policy analysis in areas such as macroeconomic adjustment, trade relations, labor market performance, poverty and inequality.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    ECON 416/4061 - Mathematical Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    The course starts with a discussion of quasiconcave programming (Kuhn-Tucker theorem), then moves on to linear (first- and second-order) and nonlinear difference equations. This is followed by linear and nonlinear differential equations, including stability analysis, steady-state equilibrium, convergence and phase diagrams. In addition, systems of differential equations (the saddle path) are also studied. The final component of the course is dynamic optimization covering finite- and infinite-horizon problems as well as discounting. Economic applications are emphasized throughout the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 418/4081 - Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and concurrent with ECON 4082  

    Description
    The first part of the course covers extensions of the classical linear model including departures from the basic assumptions of the general model: multicollinearity, autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity, endogenous regressors and GMM estimation. The second part discusses models with limited dependent variables (e.g. logit and probit models) and their applications. The third part explores panel data, covering issues related to estimation and inference in panel datasets as well as applications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 418P/4082 - Practicum (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with ECON 4081  

    Description
    This practicum is structured to run parallel with ECON 4081. It is conduced as an application of the tools studied in ECON 4081to solve practical problems using econometrics software.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 405/4091 - History of Economic Thought (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course investigates the historical evolution of economic theory by examining the development of Mercantilism, Physiocracy, Classical, Marxian, Neoclassical theory, Austrian-Keynesian and post-Keynesian economics.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 414/4094 - Economics of Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and   . Junior standing or higher.

    Description
    This course is an application of economic tools to explore the performance, analyze major problems and propose reform agendas for the contemporary Egyptian economy. Among the topics discussed are the path of economic development, macroeconomic performance, sectorial behavior, and institutional restructuring since the Nasser era and up to the present time. The course gives the students a chance to conduct applied research and to design policy solutions related to challenges facing the Egyptian economy.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 411/4099 - Seminar: Special Topics in Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Pre-requisites vary depending on the topic of the course

    Description
    Guided reading, research, and discussion of specific topics chosen by the instructor in theoretical policy or applied economics.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    ECON 521/5200 - Independent Study (3 cr.)



    Description
    Guided reading, research, and discussion based on a subject of mutual interest to a student and faculty member. Must obtain the approval of the Director of Graduate Program and Chair of the Department.

  
  •  

    ECON 525/5201 - Research Workshop (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 5211 ECON 5221  and ECON 5281 

    Note: Consent of professor is needed if one of the courses is to be taken concurrently.

    Description
    This course offers an overview of different research methods and processes, resulting in the completion and presentation of a major research paper by each student.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.

  
  •  

    ECON 599/5202 - Research Guidance and Thesis (6 cr.)



  
  •  

    ECON 502/5211 - Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Axioms of consumer preferences and rational utility representation. Derivation of Marshallian, Hicksian and Engel demands. Consumer theory under uncertainty. Advanced theory of the firm. Market structure and competition including Counot, Bertrand, and Stackelberg competition for homogeneous and differentiated products. The Envelope Theorem and its applications including Roy, Sheppard, and Hotelling Lemmas. The equilibrium number of firms and business cycle behavior. General equilibrium theory.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 519/5213 - Project Evaluation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   or FINC 5201 .

    Description
    Analysis of economic criteria (cost benefit analysis) applied in evaluating development projects for economic policy and planning, following a review of the project cycle from inception to impact evaluation.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 520/5215 - Competitive Strategy and Game Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ECON 3011  or FINC 5201  and Consent of Instructor.

    Description
    Analysis of competitive strategy and game theory including Nash equilibrium and its refinements. Subgame perfection, Bayesian equilibrium, and information uncertainty. Repeated games. Game theory applications to various economic themes such as in trade, labor, industry, education, stock markets, insurance, and R & D.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 530/5217 - Health Economics in Developing Countries (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    This course explores health economics and its unique features in relation to the developing world. Students will learn about the supply and demand for services provided by the health care sector and gain an understanding of the markets for health professionals and health care provider firms specifically extant in the developing world. The course will also explore the roles of insurance, managed care and HMO’s, professional licensure, for-profit and not-for-profit provider firms, and asymmetric information problems in health care markets. Finally, the course will explore issues within the developing world pertaining to regulation, government financing of health care, and health care reform.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 531/5219 - Health Care Financing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or (   and  )

    Description
    This course explores how health care systems in the developing world raise revenue, the advantages and disadvantages of varying methods of doing so, and how health systems strike a balance between public and private revenue sources. The course also explores how policy makers choose which services to include in publicly-financed health systems, the allocation of resources to those ‘purchasing’ health care, and the degree to which there is a role for competition in this realm. This course will also explore how resources are allocated to health care providers and the incentives associated with different payment methods.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 501/5221 - Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Analysis of the equilibrium and disequilibrium macroeconomic activity of an open, monetized economy with a government sector. Theories of aggregate consumption and investment behavior.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 505/5231 - Advanced International Trade (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or (   and  ).

    Description
    Analysis of topics in the pure theory of international trade. International aspects of monetary mechanisms, nature and effects of foreign investment, significance of trade theory and monetary movements for developing countries.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 517/5233 - International Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on the fundamental open macroeconomic issues whether theoretical or empirical. Topics covered include the economics of exchange rates, models of speculative attacks, Mundell-Fleming model, regime credibility, predicting currency and financial crises, international capital flows, and international contagion.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 504/5241 - Financial Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and consent of instructor

    Description
    Analysis of financial assets and institutions. The course emphasizes modern asset valuation theory and the role of financial intermediaries, and their regulation, in the financial system. State-preference theory and optimal portfolio decision mean-variance portfolio theory, measuring portfolio risk and return, Capital Asset Pricing model (CAPM), Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT), Option Pricing Theory, the Black-Scholes formula, Asymmetric information and rational expectations, term structure of interest rates.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 528/5242 - Financial Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    .

    Description
    This course aims to advance students’ understanding of modern econometric techniques related to financial issues. This course will cover frontier tools of financial econometrics and empirical finance. The interaction between financial theory and econometric analysis is emphasized. Topics include: non-normality of financial data, volatility clustering and asymmetric volatility, time series models, Vector Autoregressive (VAR) models and continuous time and threshold models. The course is also designed to train students in formulating, estimating and testing models for financial time series using EViews software.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 500/5251 - The Economic Setting for Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    Does not count for credit in the M.A. degree in Economics. Foundation course dealing with macroeconomic variables and issues concerned with the functioning of an economy, in addition to selected microeconomic aspects pertinent to development. Special attention is given to concepts and tools applicable to challenges facing developing countries whose economies often lack the maturity of more developed countries in terms of institutional and policy settings.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 511/5252 - Economic Development in Middle East Countries (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the economic structures, institutions, and policy challenges in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Topics investigated include: the demographic transition, the participation of women in the workforce, regional migration, growth and structural change, poverty, inequality, and regional integration.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 512/5254 - Economic Growth & Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       

    Description
    Growth models and their limitations in developing countries, role of capital, investment, and inflation in economic development, non-economic factors, criteria, and choices of techniques in the process of development.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 514/5256 - Ethical Issues in Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    This course issues of an ethical nature that are related to the development process, decision-making and implementation of development projects. The course will first consider ethical and moral concepts and their philosophical underpinnings and review different schools of thought. Against this background, selected issues specific to development strategies and practices will be dealt with. The course will make use of case studies to illustrate and help analyze issues of concern.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 522/5257 - Economic Strategies for Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    (  and   ) or (  and   )

    Description
    This course explores economic strategies achieving balanced and sustainable development from Keynesian, Structuralist, and Neoclassical perspectives. Development policy concerned with short term resource allocation, medium term economic adjustments, and sustainable long term economic growth with technical progress will be studied. Comparative country studies will conclude the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 590/5259 - Research Practicum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of at least 3 core courses.

    Description
    This course is a 200-hour assignment requiring that students gain extensive experience with a relevant development-related institution either locally or abroad. It is to be completed over a 4-6 week period providing students exposure and work experience in a development setting. Students are then required to prepare, under faculty supervision, a substantial research-based paper drawing on their practicum experience.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 516/5261 - Mathematical Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to economic models: models of the single sector, the trade cycle, growth with employment, medium- and long-term planning, and cyclical growth. Economic regulation, the treatment of technical progress, input-output models.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 508/5271 - Labor Economics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course delivers an advanced treatment of mainstream and alternative approaches to labor economics emphasizing an integration of theoretical and empirical models. Topics to be covered include the life cycle human capital models, search theoretic models, internal markets, reservation wages, migration, inequality, and poverty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 518/5281 - Time Series Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    The course covers the theory and practice of time series econometrics, including ARMA and VAR models and their applications. Non-stationary time series is analyzed such as unit roots, co-integration and error correction model. Further topics are volatility models (GARCH models) that model the conditional variances and covariances of time series data. Forecast evaluation and model selection methods are also discussed.

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 507/5282 - Quantitative Methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course aims to ensure that students understand, master and apply quantitative techniques used in modeling and decision-making related to development. More specifically, the course introduces the basic concepts of quantitative approaches to decision making. It also utilizes wide applications of quantitative techniques to analyze a variety of economic and social problems. Topics include: regression analyses, factor and cluster analysis, panel data and qualitative models.
     

    When Offered
    Offered once a year.
  
  •  

    ECON 509/5291 - An Advanced History of Economic Thought (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore, using bothprimary and secondary sources, the ideas put forth by the great economic thinkers. Class discussion will center on the immediate social impact of these ideas and the factors influencing the course of their evolutionary or revolutionary change over time. Further, this class will encourage students to think critically about the writings of the great economists and explore the possibility that ideological bias is an inexorable feature of science.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 506/5299 - Advanced Topics in Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor

     

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussion in special topics in Economics. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

 

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