Jan 20, 2022  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 

 

 

Arabic Language Intensive Summer

  
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    ALIS 333-334/3133-3134 - Advanced Aural Media (1-3 cr. each)



    Description
    Trains students to take notes while listening to broadcasts. Expands their range of vocabulary and develops their ability to listen to lengthier passages. Each course meets three or five hours per week.

  
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    ALIS 341-342/3201-3202 - Advanced Translation (1 cr. each)



    Description
    Focus in this course is more on problems and issues of translation. Students are expected to produce coherent, culturally sensitive texts in both languages. Graded authentic texts are used.

  
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    ALIS 352/3251 - Readings in Modern Arabic Literature (1 cr.)



    Description
    Selections from a variety of prose writings: short stories, novels, plays, and poetry by writers from different Arab countries. Course meets three hours per week.

  
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    ALIS 311-312/3301-3302 - Advanced Colloquial Arabic (2-3 cr. each)



    Description
    Develops students’ ability to express themselves more precisely and fluently. Uses authentic material, whether recorded or written, to encourage discussion. Each course meets five or seven hours per week.

  
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    ALIS 391-392/3991-3992 - Supervised Studies (1-4 cr. each)



    Description
    Study of a selected topic according to the students’ level and interests.

    Hours
    Each course meets two to seven hours per week
    When Offered
    Offered in summer.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.

Arabic Writing

  
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    ALWT 221/2271 - From Reading to Writing: Intermediate Level: 3 credits



    Description
    This course combines reading and writing skills in various disciplines such as Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, History, Arts, etc. Special attention is given to basic structures, fixing common mistakes, rhetorical devices, clichés, collocations, and vocabulary building. Students reaching intermediate level in the Arabic Writing Placement exam can take this course. Registration requires permission of the ALNG Director.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring.
  
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    ALWT 321/3271 - From Reading to Writing: High Intermediate Level: 3 credits



    Description
    This course combines reading and writing skills in various disciplines such as Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, History, Arts, etc. Special attention is given to basic structures, fixing common mistakes, rhetorical devices, clichés, collocations, and vocabulary building. Thanawiya amma holders or students reaching high-intermediate level in the Arabic Writing Placement exam can take this course.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring.
    Notes
    The level of material taught is higher than those taught in ALWT 2271 but following the same guidelines.

  
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    ALWT 462/4201 - Professional Translation in Business: 3 credits



    Prerequisites
       or consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to meet the pressing need for high level translation in all work places. Attention is given to points of contrast, idiomatic usage, semantic fields of corresponding vocabulary in both English and Arabic in business administration and economics.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall, winter, spring and summer.
  
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    ALWT 463/4202 - Diplomatic Professional Translation: 3 credits



    Prerequisites
       or consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to meet the pressing need for high level translation in all work places. Attention is given to points of contrast, idiomatic usage, and semantic fields of corresponding vocabulary in both English and Arabic in the field of diplomacy and political science.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall, winter, spring and summer.
  
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    ALWT 420/4271 - From Reading to Writing: Advanced Level: 3 credits



    Prerequisites
    Students reaching Advanced level in the Arabic Writing Placement Exam or have taken either 3271.

    Description
    This course combines reading and writing skills in various disciplines such as Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, History, Arts, etc. It develops further the reading and writing skills. Special attention is given to complex structures, fixing common mistakes, rhetorical devices, clichés, collocations, and vocabulary building.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring.
  
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    ALWT 421/4272 - Arabic Language Proficiency for Media Writing 3 credits



    Prerequisites
    Approval of ALNG Director.

    Description
    This course aims at improving students’ proficiency in the Arabic language It trains students to efficiently use discourse markers and cohesive connectors to successfully conduct interviews and write news reports in modern standard Arabic. Students will also be familiarized with different Arabic media writings.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall, winter, spring and summer.
  
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    ALWT 422/4273 - Professional Business Writing: 3 credits



    Prerequisites
    Students reaching advanced level the Arabic Writing Placement Exam or have taken either 3271.

    Description
    The course bridges the communication gap between language course work and information- transfer needs of business. The course trains the student to write major forms of business writing, including correspondence, memoranda, reports and the like.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring.
  
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    ALWT 423/4274 - Professional Diplomatic Writing (3 cr)



    Prerequisites
    Students reaching advanced level in the Arabic Writing Placement Exam or have taken 3271.

    Description
    The course bridges the communication gap between language course work and information- transfer needs of diplomacy. The course trains the student to write major forms of diplomatic writing, including correspondence, memoranda, reports and the like.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall and spring. 
  
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    ALWT 521/5271 - Professional Arabic TV Script Writing 3 credits



    Prerequisites
      or Approval of ALNG Director

    Description
    This course is a continuation of   . This course makes students practice writing TV scripts in syntactically and semantically eloquent Arabic. It also develops students’ Arabic language through further understanding of Arabic and Egyptian culture.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall, winter, spring and summer.

Architectural Engineering

  
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    ARCH 221/1511 - Free-hand Representation for Architects (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     


     

    Description
    Free-hand manual drawing and manual visual communication for designers. Three primary modules covering conceptual diagramming and idea sketching; tools for diagrammatic analysis; and rendering and final presentation using manual techniques.

    Hours
    Three hours studio period.

  
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    ARCH 273/1521 - Digital Representation Tools for Architects (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    An introduction to different forms of digital representation in architecture: architectural drawings, 3D-modeling, rendering, sheet layout design and fundamentals in animation and image editing. Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM) and graphical representation software. Such techniques are utilized as design tools for the creative development of projects and communication with clients and consultants from different disciplines in architectural practice.

    Hours
    One-hour class period and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 222/1561 - Architecture: Art or Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    A study of architecture as a way of contrasting the “Arts” and “Engineering” approaches to design. The course addresses issues of form and space generation, function and interior environment, exterior and site, and materials and construction. Famous buildings and styles will be critically analyzed from the perspectives of both the artist and the engineer.

  
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    ARCH 314/2211 - History and Philosophy of Modern and Contemporary Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites


     

    Description
    A brief history of architecture from Ancient Egyptian to Baroque. Introduction to the historical development of twentieth-century and twenty-first architecture in the western tradition, including its social, technological, and conceptual aspects. Special emphasis on studying different paradigms, individual architects, buildings, and theoretical writings. Traditional, local vernacular, and contemporary vernacular architecture are also studied.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 234/2221 - Human Aspects in Architectural Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      , ARCH 221/1511 - Free-hand Representation for Architects (3 cr.)  

    Description
    Introduction to architectural design related environment-behavior issues. Introduction to architectural programming and post-occupancy evaluation. Human aspects in design: perception, behavioral uses of spaces, users needs, ergonomics, proximics. Design for the disabled. Effects of cultural processes on architecture and urban design. Use of environment-behavior research methods in architecture and urban design. Design applications of theoretical concepts into design projects.
     

    Hours
    One hour class period and 3 hours studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 326/2231 - Environmental Control Systems and Sustainable Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      , MACT 1121   and   

    Description
    Basic principles and application of environmental systems: acoustic, lighting, HVAC, energy use, and their integration with the building envelop. Performance of the building envelops materials and assemblies. Introduction to LEED and similar systems. Sustainable design principles and its applications. Sustainable design project.



     

    Hours
    Three-hour studio period and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ARCH 268/2411 - Surveying for Architects (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MACT 1121  

    Description
    Basics of surveying theory, recording field data and representation of data. Digital mapping production and contouring. Surveying applications including field work of detail surveying, stakeout, and parcel boundaries. Survey planning and associated survey computations. Operation of automatic level, total station and GPS. Introduction to 3D scanning of buildings.
     

    Hours
    Three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Not specified.
  
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    ARCH 250/2512 - Foundations of 3-Dimensional Design (3 cr.)



    Description
    Basic concepts and fundamentals of visualization, thinking, and design of simple forms in three dimensions. Presentation, communication and basic design skills using simple three dimensional modeling exercises in manual formats. Balance between aesthetic and functional design criteria. No previous modeling or digital experience is required.

    Hours
    Four-hour studio period.
  
  
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    ARCH 351/2552 - Architectural Design Studio I (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,    

    Description
    Studio on designing in behavioral and socio-cultural contexts. “Inside-out” approach to Architecture. Design through the study of behavioral use of space. Age, sex, culture and individuality as well as complex functional relationships influence on architectural design. Study of the nature of human behavior and how it can be incorporated, facilitated, modified and influenced through architectural design. Design for special needs populations. Introduction to developing project brief through definition of the needs of society, users and clients.
     

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 428/3311 - Detail Design and Finishes in Buildings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Construction details, materials selection, and methods of construction of building finishes: floors, walls, ceiling; stairs, openings, installations, specialty works. Design and detailing of architectural components. Both manual drawings and CAD are used to develop the construction details.

     

    Hours
    Four hours studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ARCH 426/3321 - Building Service Systems and Building Systems Integration (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Basic principles of plumbing, electrical, and mechanical systems in buildings. Integration of building systems. Assessment, selection and integration of structural systems, building envelop, environmental, life safety, and building systems into building design.
     

    Hours
    Two-hour class period and three-hour lab period.
  
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    ARCH 323/3331 - Construction Materials and Quality Control (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ENGR 2102  

    Description
    Concepts of Stress and Strain. Uniaxial, bending, torsion, shear and combined Stresses. Types and properties of construction materials and components. Concepts of quality control, statistical evaluation and corresponding experimental work. Aggregates types, sources and quality. Inorganic cements. Concrete mix design, admixtures and quality control. Asphalt cement, asphalt concrete mix design and quality control. Steel in construction. Masonry materials, timber, insulating materials and coatings.

    Hours
    Two one-hour class periods and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 473/3522 - Digital Design Studio and Workshop (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 3554  

    Description
    The course involves in-depth investigations focused on the capabilities of computation in architectural design. It provides an overview of computational tools and methodologies of design, involving topics such as parametric and generative modelling, algorithmic thinking, visualization and digital fabrication. Hands-on implementation of computational tools is exercised during lab sessions by means of parametric modelling and digital fabrication software. Students work back and forth between physical material experimentation and digital translation of parameters, rules, constraints and relationships to develop their solutions in applied design projects. In the process, students learn how to automatically extract data from parametric models for multiple purposes, including but not limited to digital fabrication, environmental analysis, and documentation and detailing.

    Hours
    Three-hour studio period and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 368/3531 - Housing Design and Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Context, history and framework of regional, city and urban planning. Concepts, features and characteristics of human settlements. Interrelationship between socio-cultural contexts and housing processes. Design of housing areas and housing units. Design of ‘appropriate’ and ‘responsive’ residential environments within specific resources. Concepts and system components of GIS. Creation and management of a geodatabase. GIS analysis and applications in housing projects.
     

    Hours
    Three-hour studio period and three hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 352/3553 - Architectural Design Studio II (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     ARCH 2211 ,   

    Description
    Studio on form, space and composition. “Outside-in” approach to architecture. The architectural form and its composition. The compositional aspects of spatial design- expression, language, intent, dynamics etc. and their use as tools of concept and functional accommodation. Three-dimensional models and design development. Spatial approach to design. Meaning, message and symbolism. Work with architectural precedents through analysis of various works of architects. Contemporary design theory as a premise for design.
     

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 453/3554 - Architectural Design Studio III (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and   .

    Description
    Studio on Environment and Sustainability. This studio will allow students to investigate various aspects of the environment and ‘sustainability’ as a force within the architectural profession. Recent increases in global climatic and social pressures have necessitated environmental awareness as well as new architectural design solutions. Using current sustainable design strategies as a foundation, students will analyze and implement their own environmentally responsible analysis and designs. Conservation and recycling of materials and waste management. Field trip to gain hand on experience on the sustainable design and waste management is a requirement.
     

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 321/3562 - Introduction to Architectural Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Role of the architect and other engineers in building construction. Introduction to the factors influencing architectural design. Building components, materials and assemblies. Architectural drawing and detailing.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    (Two-hours lecture period and three-hour lab period)

  
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    ARCH 496/3950 - Internship in Construction Projects (0 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Each student is required to spend a minimum of 4 weeks of internship in Egypt or abroad. These should include substantial practical training in construction activities. A complete account of the experience is reported, reflected on, and evaluated.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 429/4312 - Design Development and Construction Documents (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     ARCH 3321  

    Description
    Development of design into technical documents. Production of construction documents. Design of construction assemblies, constructability aspects and choice of materials. Building coordination and integration using Building Information Modeling applications. Drawing conventions and symbols. Building permit package. Basics of technical specifications. 

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 441/4421 - Professional Practice, Design Management and Codes (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 2552  

    Description
    Types of architecture firms. Design process management. Business management of architecture firms. Procurement of architectural services. Architects’ administrative role. Architecture practice stakeholders. Building contracts and legal aspects. Building codes. Introduction to real-estate investment concepts. Applicaions on design projects.

     

    Hours
    One hour class period and 1.5 hours studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ARCH 468/4532 - Urban Design and Landscape Architecture (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course is intended to teach students the basics of urban design and landscape architecture using a set of lectures and a design project. In the first part, ethnographic fieldwork, designing for inclusive communities and placemaking approaches are discussed through the analysis of visual elements, urban form, grain, texture, and social fabric of existing lively streets. Students apply tactical urbanism and urban acupuncture as strategies for surgical intervention and urban development. In the second part, students learn to design a sustainable masterplan for an urban design problem in the city tackling: urban informality, heritage site, or new desert development by engaging with community issues, economic forces, and environmental factors. Urban design solutions are generated through experimentation, contextual physical models and graphic representation. Students work in teams and present their ideas and design schemes collectively.

    Hours
    One-hour class period and three-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 420/4541 - Introduction to Interior Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 2551   or (ARCH 1521  and DSGN 2201 )

    Description
    Historical background of Interior Design Styles. Concepts and principles of interior design. Space planning and design. Aesthetics of Interior Design. Color and lighting. Materials selection. Function, material and layout of furniture and textiles. Ergonomics and design. Mood Board design.

    Hours
    Two-hours lecture and two-hours studio.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 454/4555 - Architectural Design 4 (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
        - ARCH 323/3331 - Construction Materials and Quality Control (4 cr.)  

    Description
    Studio on the Art of Structure and Technology. This studio’s primary objective is to link the two basic components of architecture- art and engineering. Based on a firm understanding of structural systems and their appropriate application to architectural design, projects will be designed to incorporate both aesthetic beauty and structural thinking. The influence of technology in the form of new materials and methods will be examined through their design potential. Three-Dimensional manual and digital models will play an essential role in the design development processes of this studio.

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  
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    ARCH 455/4558 - Architectural Design Studio VIII Design Studio High Tech (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 456/4557 - Architectural Design Studio VI Design Studio Contextual (4 cr.)  

    ARCH 473/3522 - Digital Design Studio and Workshop (3 cr.)  

    Description
    Studio on smart buildings and high-tech architecture. Expanding on the 1970’s theme of High-Tech architecture, this studio aims at redefining the role of cutting edge technology in design- both process and product. Digital technology has revolutionized the way we conceptualized, visualize, present and are eventually able to construct our buildings, making impossible designs of the past a reality. Rapid developments in materials, building systems and construction methods have broadened our design horizons. Issues such as virtual architecture and smart buildings will be explored with regards to their viability and role in the future of architecture.

    Hours
    Six-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    ARCH 000/4561 - Vertical Design Studio A (5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARIC 2205 , ARCH 3554 , ARCH 4421 , ARCH 4532 , ARCH 3311 , CENG 3151  

    Description
    First part of a vertical design studio sequence. Design adopts an innovative approach and a theoretical position in one of three areas of interest: building design: human and environmental studies, tectonics and computational design, and architecture and urban heritage design. Development of design foundations and theoretical frameworks based on a critical review of works, theories and polemics in architecture, and case studies of buildings, spaces, structures within specific settings. Study of components and drivers of design. Development of a space and functional program. Production of a preliminary schematic design.

  
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    ARCH 000/4562 - Vertical Design Studio B (5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4561  , ARCH 3522  , ARCH 3321 , CENG 3152  

    Description
    Second part of a vertical design studio sequence. Design builds on the innovative approach and theoretical position that was developed in the vertical design studio A in one of three areas of interest: building design: human and environmental studies, tectonics and computational design, and architecture and urban heritage design. Development of advanced schematic design using innovative spatial and formal arrangements. Design development and innovative detail exploration.

  
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    ARCH 000/4570 - Senior Design Studio (5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4562  , ARCH 4541  , ARCH Elective, EGPT 2030 , ARCH 4312  

     

    Description
    First part of an advanced capstone vertical design studio sequence with the senior project. Design adopts an innovative approach and a theoretical position in one of three areas of interest: building design: human and environmental studies, tectonics and computational design, and architecture and urban heritage design. Development of design foundations and theoretical frameworks based on a critical review of works, theories and polemics in architecture, and case studies of buildings, spaces, structures within specific settings. Study of components and drivers of design. Development of a space and functional program. Production of a preliminary schematic design.

  
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    ARCH 000/4801 - Human and Environmental Studies Theory and Dissertation (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4562  

    Description
    Theoretical framework on state of the art research in human and environmentally responsive design. Definition of a critical theoretical position on a research subject and expression of the position through a theoretical foundation. Development a structured methodology for investigation. Production of a well-written dissertation about a selected topic related to building design with emphasis on human and environmental studies.

  
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    ARCH 000/4802 - Tectonics and Computational Design Theory and Dissertation (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4562  

    Description
    Theoretical framework on state of the art research in tectonics and computational design. Definition of a critical theoretical position on a research subject and expression of the position through a theoretical foundation. Development a structured methodology for investigation. Production of a well-written dissertation about a selected topic related to building design with emphasis on human and environmental studies.

  
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    ARCH 000/4803 - Architecture and Urban Heritage Theory and Dissertation (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4562  

    Description
    Theoretical framework on state of the art research in architecture and urban heritage studies and design. Definition of a critical theoretical position on a research subject and expression of the position through a theoretical foundation. Development a structured methodology for investigation. Production of a well-written dissertation about a selected topic related to building design with emphasis on human and environmental studies.

  
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    ARCH 480/4920 - Special Problems in Architectural Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department chair on the basis of a well-defined proposal.

    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of construction may be assigned to individual students or groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
  
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    ARCH 494/4930 - Selected Topics in Architectural Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Description
    Specialized topics in Architecture will be selected and presented.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 000/4931 - Introduction to Urban and Architecture Conservation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Egypt is one of the richest countries in its cultural heritage. Monuments, buildings of value, archaeological remains, and preserved urban tissues are dispersed along its geographical areas dating back from pre-history, Ancient Egyptian, Coptic, Islamic, Colonial and Modern periods, in addition to the vernacular settlements. Although this gift is an asset for its development, challenges for comprehensive conservation and valorization are great. Poverty, demographic pressure, lack of awareness, deteriorating services, environmental hazards, and difficult bureaucratic procedures are among other difficulties facing heritage successful preservation.

  
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    ARCH 000/4932 - Sustainable Landscape architecture in Hot an Arid Environments (3 cr.)



    Description
    The aim of this course is for students to understand the context and the process within which sustainable landscape environments are conceived and designed, from concept to preparation of construction documents stage and to apply this knowledge in a specific landscape design project with emphasis on establishing sustainable sites consideration.

  
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    ARCH 000/4933 - Vernacular Architecture (3 cr.)



    Description
    The objective of this course is to introduce students to a departure from conventional architecture to the vernacular. By exploring architecture without architects, the vernacular will be discussed not as a style or even an architectural approach, but an attitude. Using examples from different geographic regions and different historical periods, as well as contemporary interpretations, students will engage in a series of lectures, debates, research and design.

    Hours
    Three hour class and studio period
  
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    ARCH 000/4934 - Cairo in the Curriculum, The Urban Laboratory: Mapping Cairo’s Complexities (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the city of Cairo through the lens of the juxtopolis pedagogy. It defines the city as a multi-layered series of juxtapositions representing often colliding and oppositional urban conditions. Students are expected to apply various mapping tools to document these urban juxtapositions through a series of thematic investigations that change every semester.

  
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    ARCH 000/4935 - Coptic Art and Architecture (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate course to students majoring in either art or architecture, as the theme of the course covers the study of architectural forms and elements of Coptic churches, construction and roofing systems, as well as portraits, iconography, wall paintings, decorative patterns, wood and stone carving.

  
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    ARCH 000/4936 - Design of Interior Spaces (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 420/4541 - Introduction to Interior Design (3 cr.)  

    Description
    An applied studio on the design and application of interior design concepts and technical aspects. Lighting and texture in the design of interior spaces. Principles of furniture design and manufacturing. Utilization of textiles and accessories in interior spaces. Integration of finish materials & elements. Sustainability in the design of interior spaces. Creating an image and signage systems. Design for the disabled.
    Hours: 1 hr lecture and 3 hrs studio

  
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    ARCH 000/4937 - Seminar on Contemporary Architecture Discourse (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 352/3553 - Architectural Design Studio II (4 cr.)  

    Description
    This course attempts to question the assumption that local architects and designers have little value to add to the global design discourse. Readings and discussions over the presentations of a number of local designers on their works and design directions will be the channel to debate this issue against the backdrop of the concurrent global discourse. Students should emerge with a critical understanding of the contemporary architecture discourse in Egypt and express such an understanding within an effective theoretical format.

  
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    ARCH 000/4938 - Urban Dialogues on Heritage and Space (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4532  

    Description
    This course introduces students to the field of “heritage” and how it has emerged as a concept and mechanism to organize the city since the nineteenth century till our present time. Emphasis will be on understanding the role of heritage in the city, its underpinning politics, and the key role it plays in constructing new forms of historical knowledge. The course foregrounds the theoretical debates around the topic and invites experts in the field to discuss their projects and researches. The course adopts the possibility of heritage in becoming a gateway for the past, a mode of development for the present and social action for the future. It offers students a platform to investigate, question and imagine how heritage projects can re-map the city and its spaces, transform it and become a means of civic engagement and empowerment to its citizens.

  
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    ARCH 000/4939 - Advanced Architectural Computing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 3522  

    Description
    This course introduces students to concepts of interactive media, responsive systems, physical computing, human-computer interaction, architectural robotics, tangible and natural user interfaces, building automation, and smart building systems. Emphasis will be on using physical computing to automate computer aided architectural design operations and using interactive media to aid the process of generative design, and performative analysis and evaluation.

  
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    ARCH 497/4951 - Internship in Technical Drawing and Design (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    Each student is required to spend a minimum of 8 weeks of internship in Egypt or abroad. The internship should include substantial practical training in technical drawing and design. Introduction to professional ethics, professional judgment and the social responsibilities of architects. A complete account of the experience with a reflection on its learning outcomes is reported on, presented and evaluated.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
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    ARCH 000/4971 - Selected Topics in Human and Environmental Studies of Architectural Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing

    Description
    Specialized topics in Human and Environmental Studies will be selected and presented

  
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    ARCH 000/4972 - Selected Topics in Tectonics and Computational Design of Architectural Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing

    Description
    Specialized topics in Tectonics and Computational Design will be selected and presented.

  
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    ARCH 000/4973 - Selected Topics in Architecture and Urban Heritage Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing

    Description
    Specialized topics in Architecture and Urban Heritage Design will be selected and presented

  
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    ARCH 490/4980 - Senior Project I (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4557  

    Description
    A capstone project. Topics are selected by students from a set defined by advisors and according to their area of interest. Project analysis and research. Developing project brief through definition of the needs of society, users and clients. Preparation of space and functional programs. In depth studies of specific design aspects.
     

    Hours
    Three-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring
  
  •  

    ARCH 491/4981 - Senior Project (5 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    ARCH 4558 , ARCH 4980 ARCH 4312 , ARCH 4541 , ARCH 4570 , ARCH 4801  , ARCH 4802  , ARCH 4803  

    Description
    Second part of the advanced capstone vertical design studio sequence. Design builds on the innovative approach and theoretical position that was developed in the senior design studio in one of three areas of interest: human and environmental studies, tectonics and computational design, and architecture and urban heritage design. Development of advanced schematic design using innovative spatial and formal arrangements. Design development and innovative detail exploration.

    Hours
    Eight-hour studio period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ARCH 000/5201 - Philosophy & Theory of Architecture (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course seeks to connect the architecture debate with the wider historical, cultural and political discourse. Students explore writings in theory and philosophy where political, social, and cultural aspirations become arguments for architectural and urban modernity. The seminar structure allows students to juxtapose different readings against each other to emerge with new modes of questioning. The goal is to unravel some of the complexities of the intertwined networks of relationships that make the questions we ask more relevant than the specific answers we often reach.

  
  •  

    ARCH 000/5202 - Critical Thinking in Architectural Design (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this course, the students as the primary investigators in any research for design process become the primary target of investigation. Their own approaches and perspectives are put to question raising the critical perspective of informed questioning especially as it pertains to the specific intangible and tangible dimensions of design and the profession. Critical readings of how social, cultural, and political contexts agendas become effective arguments for architectural and urban design decisions will inform the debates within an applied studio setting on how professional forms of research, communication and practice produce knowledge and architecture outcomes.

  
  •  

    ARCH 000/5221 - Research Methods in Architecture (3 cr.)



    Description
    Architectural research is the search for new knowledge and new ideas about the built environment. This course seeks to prepare the graduate architecture researcher to deal with the diverse questions that are related to studying the built environment and the various research approaches and methods available to adopt in the process of pursuing research questions. It poses the key issues distinguishing architectural research from other disciplines, and introduces an array of the different methods that are available for integration, with an exploration of their application challenges through case studies.

  
  •  

    ARCH 000/5290 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis.

    Notes
    Must be taken twice for credit.


Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 103/1010 - Introduction to Life Sciences (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    Non-science majors only.

    Description
    This course aims to emphasize the connection between fundamental principles of Biology and other life sciences. Lectures and lab sessions cover topics such as the cell as basic unit of life, biological molecules to understand energy flow and nutrition, tissues and organ systems (with a focus on human health), and ecological and evolutionary processes explaining biodiversity.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Students taking BIOL 1010 may not take   for credit.

  
  •  

    BIOL 104/1011 - Introductory Biology I (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Description
    Introduction to the basic concepts of biology, molecules of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cell respiration, cell cycle and cancer are presented. Basis and applications of genetics and molecular biology are addressed. The course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, principles and processes upon which the unity of life is based: the relationship of the course material to their day-to-day world: and how to apply scientific methods. Laboratories introduces students to basic principles of plant and animal structure and function and build on the principles of inheritance to the structure and function of tissues and organ systems.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall, spring and summer.
    Notes
    Students cannot take both BIOL 1010  and BIOL1011 for credit

  
  •  

    BIOL 105/1012 - Introductory Biology II (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    BIOL 1011  or exemption

    Description
    Based on the diversity of life: viruses, bacteria, protistans, fungi, plants and animals are studied. The course concentrates on characteristics of different domains of life, structure, and function of plants and animals, population genetics, ecology and the environment. Laboratories introduce students to evolution, structure and function of different populations of organisms and ecosystems. Some field applications are examined.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    This course is designed for science majors, but can be taken by anyone interested in studying biology in more depth than   .

  
  •  

    BIOL 102/1040 - Essentials of Environmental Biology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Non-science majors only.

    Description
    This course is designed for non-science majors who are interested in in learning more about environmental issues through the lens of biological principles. The course covers biological concepts and fundamentals of environmental biology, and introduced students to a range of environmental issues (pollution, degradation of natural resources, overpopulation, etc.) that are currently affecting Egypt and the rest of the planet. The course will highlight man’s impact on how our planet functions and examine societal and scientific solutions to these problems. The course is taught through lectures, class projects, reading discussions, and may include mandatory field trips and active participation in a sustainable community development project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 000/1098 - Fundamentals of Neurosciences (3 + 1 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an interdisciplinary course designed to introduce students to the basics of human biological and psychological developmental processes with emphasis on the genes, and other biological and psychological factors that affect human development, learning and behavior, through the discussion of current issues related to human behavior.

    Cross-listed
    Same as PSYC 1098  
  
  •  

    BIOL 130/1410 - Current Health Issues (4 cr.)



    Description
    Explores the public and personal health infrastructure with a focus on Egypt. The course has an optional service-learning component in which students become aware of their role in community health issues. Information will be present in the form of classroom discussions, debates, field trips, and videos.

    Notes
    This course is open to all AUC students.

  
  •  

    BIOL 199/1930 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    BIOL 241/2090 - Quantitative Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      

    Description
    This course discusses essential concepts in experimental design and hypothesis testing and introduces quantitative skills for processing, analysing, and visualizing data generated by biological and medical experiments, focusing on the analysis of gene expression data. The open-source bioinformatics and computing platform R will be introduced and used throughout the course in the laboratory sessions.

  
  •  

    BIOL 221/2150 - Genetics (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      or BIOL 1010  

    Description
    The course is designed to cover the basic fundamentals of classical and molecular genetics. This includes principal of segregation, DNA structure and genetic variation, chromosome and gene organization, replication, molecular biology of gene expression, and mechanisms of gene regulation. The course also covers genetics of bacteria and their viruses, human genome variation, biotechnology, transgenic organisms, and ethical issues in genetic research. The laboratory consist of exercises to introduce students to classical and contemporary genetic analysis.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 211/2230 - Molecular and Cell Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       and    or co-requisite.

    Description
    The course is designed to provide a detailed understanding of the structure and function of the cell. This includes mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and regulation of transcription and translational machinery. Protein sorting into functional structural proteins will be addressed with emphasis of post-translational protein modifications. Mechanisms of cell-cell signaling and their role in regulating genomic integrity and cell cycle regulation will be covered in details and consequences of abnormalities in these mechanisms will be discussed. Laboratories include the identification of basic cell structures, laboratory techniques in DNA and protein isolation, characterization and computational tools in molecular biology.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 304/2320 - Biophysics (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Principles, concepts and advances in the physical analysis of life processes. Fundamental and advanced physical and physicochemical treatment of kinetic processes underlying the normal function of biological systems will be addressed to include mechanics, hydrodynamics, electricity, optics and nuclear physics.

  
  •  

    BIOL 214/2340 - General Botany (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      (or BIOL 1010 ) and   

    Description
    This course will explore several aspects of plant biology with emphasis on structure, function, reproduction, systematics, plant metabolism and development. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of plant breeding, plant tissue culture and genetic transformation and the generation of genetically-modified crops. Detailed morphological, physiological study and greenhouse experimentation will be covered in the lab. Upon completion of this course, students will gain an appreciation for plant diversity, learning how plants are essential for supporting life on our planet and the potential impact of plant biotechnology on our life.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 302/3040 - Environmental Biology for Engineers (2 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

    Description
    This course covers aspects of soil, water, food, and mineral resources management, waste disposal, energy alternatives, population ecology, and environmental ethics with special emphasis on problems encountered by engineers. Laboratory includes field studies of ecosystems, environmental monitoring instrumentation, solar energy techniques, electronic population modeling and techniques used to deal with human consumption of natural resources.

  
  •  

    BIOL 310/3130 - Molecular Evolution and Population Genetics (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course covers a spectrum of evolutionary forces at the molecular level and their impact on allele frequencies in the population. Topics the course will address include the Hardy-Weinberg principles, linkage disequilibrium, genetic drift, neutral theory of molecular evolution, mutation and natural selection, evolution of gene families, lateral gene transfer, basics of molecular phylogenetics, and origin of viruses and origin of the cell. Laboratory sessions will include computational simulations of evolutionary forces in action, population genetics, and maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inferences.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 315/3280 - Biochemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The living cell, structure of biomolecules and their relationship to biological functions; biochemical energetics; metabolism of major cellular components and their relationship to clinical conditions..

    Cross-listed
    Same as .
    Hours
    Two class periods and one three hour lab period.
  
  •  

    BIOL 307/3310 - Microbiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides a broad understanding of the microbial world, its application and implications. The fundamentals and principles of bacteriology, virology and mycology are addressed. Cellular and molecular aspects that contribute to selected infectious diseases and the role of the immune system in preventing such diseases are discussed. Additionally we examine the recent advances in pharmaceutical and biotechnology application of microbes.

     

  
  •  

    BIOL 312/3326 - Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The principal objective of this course is to give the student a solid foundation in understanding the anatomy and physiology of the basic vertebrate body from a functional perspective. The course focuses on describing the anatomy of the major organ systems found in vertebrates and explaining how the physiology of these anatomical systems enables vertebrate bodies to function in their environment. The course will survey model organisms to compare variation in anatomy and physiology associated with different behavioral and ecological requirements. The laboratory will consist of computer learning models, physiological and biomedical experiments with living tissue and specimens to investigate the function of various organ systems, and dissection of preserved and fresh vertebrate specimens, to give students in-depth experience with anatomical identification.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 313/3340 - Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Invertebrate Zoology is the study of animals without a backbone. These organisms comprise over 99% of all animal species known. Anatomy, development, behavior, systematics, and phylogeny of diverse invertebrate groups are included in the lectures. The class also covers major groups of protozoa. Discussed examples include both representatives of each phylum and highlights of groups of medical, veterinary, or biotechnological importance. Laboratory sessions emphasize morphology and anatomy through dissections, mounted specimens, and prepared slides.

  
  •  

    BIOL 320/3341 - Animal Behavior (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Study of ethology with emphasis on its development, control and function. Laboratory includes observations and descriptions, qualification techniques and experimentation.

  
  •  

    BIOL 301/3360 - Animal Physiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    A comparative approach to the nutrient procurement, temperature, osmotic and ionic regulation, regulation of fluids, respiratory, circulatory, and digestive systems, reproduction, hormonal and nervous control, behavior, and biological rhythms of animals. Laboratory emphasizes the physiology of invertebrates and vertebrates.

  
  •  

    BIOL 303/3370 - Developmental Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the mechanisms that direct the development of multicellular organisms from a single cell. The course covers the fundamental processes operating during embryonic development including cellular differentiation, development of specialized tissues, morphogenesis, and organogenesis at the cellular and molecular levels. Special attention will be on the understanding of key experiments that contributed to the current knowledge of the basic principles implicated in the development of the organism. Laboratory includes examination of various developmental biology aspects at the molecular, cellular and morphological levels.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 341/3510 - Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr lab)



    Prerequisites
     ,   ,   .

    Description
    Ecology is the study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and the interactions with the environment that determine those distributions and abundances. The class discusses ecological interactions and mechanisms at organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Chemical, physical, evolutional, and human-driven factors that influence the natural world are explained. A laboratory emphasizing collection, analysis and interpretation of data is included and intended to expose students to a broad array of ecological techniques.

  
  •  

    BIOL 305/3540 - Environmental Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    Examination of degradation and pollution of natural environments. Aspects of soil, water, food, and mineral resources management, waste disposal, energy alternatives, population ecology, and environmental ethics. Laboratory to include field studies of ecosystems, environmental monitoring instrumentation, solar energy techniques, electronic population modeling, techniques used to deal with human consumption of natural resources.

  
  •  

    BIOL 306/3541 - Environmental Biology of the Red Sea (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: students must be good swimmers and consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary course for students with an interest in coastal and marine environmental issues. Topics covered include marine biology, ecology, geology, paleontology, climatology, and oceanography. Using the Red Sea as a model, students will receive extensive field experience in evaluating the impact of natural phenomena and human activities on coastal and marine environmental planning, management, and monitoring, as well as in the preparation of environmental impact assessments.

    Notes
    Laboratories and field trips to the Red Sea are essential to the course.

  
  •  

    BIOL 345/3542 - GIS For Biologists (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

    Description
    .Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Biologists is designed to introduce the student to the use and application of computer based mapping and analysis technology to ecological data. The application of GIS technology requires program operation skills, computerization of data and relevant biological information. The course is designed to provide “hands-on” skill development in the use and application of GIS.

  
  •  

    BIOL 360/3600 - Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    BIOL 1011  or BIOL 1012  

    Description
    Bioinformatics is the application of computational methods and tools to, retrieve, and analyse large quantities of sequence datasets. The course covers genomic public databases and resources, sequence alignment, protein structure and function prediction, and analysis of microarray gene expression. Concepts of programming for bioinformatics are introduced. The course provides the students with hands-on experience solving practical problems such as characterization of gene interest, identification of differentially expressed genes, prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, and tracking spatial and temporal dynamics of a virus.

  
  •  

    BIOL 361/3601 - Bioinformatics Tools and Techniques (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    BIOL 3600  and CSCE 1101 

     



     

    Description
    This interdisciplinary course is designed for students in biology, computer science, and mathematics to build the most essential concepts and practices for Bioinformatics development using Biopython and R.

  
  •  

    BIOL 399/3910 - Guided Studies in Environmental Sciences (3 cr.)



    Description
    Under faculty guidance, students will carry out a project on an environmentally related topic. The students will present their results by submitting a common/individual report or by passing an examination, as determined by the supervisor.

    Cross-listed
    Same as 
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 411/4150 - Molecular Biology of the Gene (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       and    or co-requisite.

    Description
    A comprehensive molecular biology course with emphasis on principles, processes and methodologies leading to the formation of central concepts of molecular genetics. Students are presented to the latest models of describing gene structure, genome organization and regulation of gene and protein expression, in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Current topics such as epigenetics, RNA interference and transgenics are also exposed. Laboratory sessions cover modern techniques in recombinant DNA technology related to gene cloning, protein expression, and omics.

  
  •  

    BIOL 415/4230 - Immunology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The students are introduced to the basic principles of immunology, including the structure and function of the immune system at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ system levels and the processes involved in the host defense against infection. This includes antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, B-and T-cell receptors, antibody formation and immunity, cytotoxic responses, and regulation of the immune response. Students are also introduced to the applied aspects of immunology, which include immunoassay design, flow cytometry and LUMENIX technology. Special topics are also highlighted and discussed including cancer immunology, immunotherapy, autoimmunity, immunomics and vaccination. Laboratories include practical experience with the anatomy and histology of the lymphoid tissues, cell isolation, identification and serological and cellular immune techniques as well as basic tissue culture techniques.

  
  •  

    BIOL 430/4330 - Tumor Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The course provides a broad knowledge on the biological principals underlying tumor and cancer formation. The basic science of tumor at the cellular, molecular and genetic level will be addressed. The course allows students to understand the fundamental mechanisms that underlie eukaryotic cell multiplication, cell senescence and cell death, including the alterations that are involved in the initiation of uncontrolled growth and carcinogenesis. In addition, cell cycle surveillance mechanisms that ensure genomic integrity and the signaling pathways that regulate tumor development and spread will be covered.

  
  •  

    BIOL 440/4540 - Marine Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      BIOL 1012  and CHEM 1005  

    Description
    Examination of the ecology of marine ecosystems. Relationship of physical and chemical processes of marine systems to biological processes and populations in both pelagic and benthic regions. Where possible, examples will be drawn from the Mediterranean and the Red seas.

    When Offered
    Not specified.
    Notes
    Includes an extended field trip to marine research institute for “hands-on” experience in marine biological research.

  
  •  

    BIOL 445/4541 - Desert Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Examination of the ecology of desert ecosystems with particular reference to Middle-Eastern deserts. Emphasis is placed on the strategies employed by desert-living organisms which allow them to survive and prosper under desert conditions. Field trips are an integral part of this course.

 

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