Dec 02, 2021  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    NANO 531/5231 - Nanomaterials, Synthesis, Processing and Applications (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to nanomaterials, their synthesis, properties, processing techniques and applications. The coverage addresses top-down and bottom-up approaches including nanomaterials ranging from small particles and isolated clusters to nanostructured materials, multilayer and consolidated bulk products, thin film and coatings. Their chemical, mechanical, optical and magnetic properties will be introduced.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 532/5232 - Nanocomposite Science and Technology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to provide fundamental understanding of emerging nanocomposite materials science and technology. The topical areas to discuss include synthesis of various nanoscale reinforcements, such as nanowires, nanotubes, and inorganic nanoparticles; fabrication and processing techniques of nanocomposites; dispersion of nanoreinforcements; interfacial adhesion; mechanical and functional properties of nanocomposites including gas/moisture barrier characteristics, electrical and magnetic properties, thermal properties and flame retardancy; molecular dynamic simulations; design and applications of nanocomposites.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 533/5233 - Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will focus on advanced electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems including fuel cells, lithium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors; Hydrogen storage; Advanced thermal storage . Through the journey in this course, students are anticipated to understand why and how these systems are advantageous in renewable energy applications.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 541/5241 - The Chemistry of Nanostructures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course addresses the synthesis and chemical properties of the different categories of nanostructures such as carbon NANOubes/nanorods/ etc…, fullerenes, colloids, Self-assembled monolayer structures (SAMs), dendrimers and other macromolecules, oxide and inorganic nanotubes/fibers/rods/etc. For each category examples of applications would be giving to demonstrate the applicability of the properties discussed.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 542/5242 - Nanoelectrochemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course addresses the fundamentals of electrochemistry, and their application to the synthesis of nanostructures, together with applications (e.g. sensors, fuel cells, batteries, electrolysis, photovoltaic cells, reduction of carbon dioxide, environmental remediation, water disinfection, ect…). Characterization and analysis techniques would also be addressed.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 551/5251 - Nanotechnology Applications in Construction Materials (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the use of nanotechnology in studying the particle shape, size and composition of conventional and advanced construction materials on a sub micro level. The correlation between the nano level characteristics and the mechanical properties as well as the durability of the materials is studied. Composition and arrangement of crystalline structures and chemical composition of materials are examined to yield materials of superior properties.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 552/5252 - Nanotechnology in Studying Damage and Failure in Structures (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course employs nanotechnology to study submicro cracks, flaws and damage indications in structures through examining the materials used. The course aims at providing early prediction of the life time of structures and nano-based prediction of the damage patters and hence around decision on repair intervention and the technique used.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 561/5261 - Advanced Solid-State Devices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in engineering and physics. Electromagnetics, vector algebra, differential equations, and MATLAB programming.

    Description
    This course covers crystal structures, band gap theory, ionic equilibrium theory, fundamentals of carrier transport, compound semiconductors III-V. This course will make special emphasis on the properties of various types of junctions (p-n junctions, heterojunctions, metal-semiconductor junctions) leading to various electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), metal oxide-semiconductor FETS (MOSFETs), high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), etc. Short Channel effects and nanoscale phenomena will be emphasized throughout the course and their impact on device modeling in analog and digital circuits.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 562/5262 - Advanced Integrated Circuit Design (3 cr.)



    Description
    The objective of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge of designing emerging nanoelectronic devices and using these devices to build future computing systems. After an introduction to CMOS devices and circuits, the course will cover CMOS design and simulation topics. More attention will be paid to the applications of these devices in the implementation of future computers. The memory and logic architectures that take advantage of the properties of the emerging devices will be discussed. Particularly, signal integrity and timing issues, as well as power consumption will be emphasized.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 571/5271 - Bionanotechnology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the use of various nanostructures for ultrasensitive detection of DNA, bacteria and viruses. Recent techniques for detection of single biomolecules that offers superior advantages over the conventional bulk measurements will also be presented. This course will also cover the use of different nanoparticles such as nanocrystals and gold nanoparticles for optical imaging, as hyperthermia agents for cancer therapy, and the development of smart drug delivery nanocarriers.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 592/5930 - Selected Topics in Nanotechnology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the faculty advisor.

    Description
    Topics to be chosen every year according to specific interests. Maybe taken for credit more than once if content changes.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 590/5940 - Graduate Thesis Seminars I (2 cr.)



    Description
    Seminar on research topics, research methodology and thesis writing. The seminars given by invited speakers include topics on the economic impact of nanoscale sciences and nanotechnology, nano-industry and nano-enterpreneurship.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 591/5941 - Graduate Thesis Seminar II (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Seminars on research topics given by invited speakers that includes health and environmental impact of nanotechnology. In addition, seminars are given by the enrolled students on their research work.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 599/5980 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis
    Must be taken at least twice for credit.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 621/6121 - Nanophotonics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will cover: Maxwell’s equations, light-matter interaction, dispersion, EM properties of nanostructures, etc., Photonic crystals Photonic crystal fibers, Photonic nanocircuits Metal optics, manipulating light with plasmonic nanostructures, plasmonic nano-sensors, near-field optics, metamaterials, negative refractive index and super-resolution.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 630/6230 - Biomaterials (3 cr.)



    Description
    Lectures will include: materials for biomedical applications and their biocompatibility; design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering; methods for biomaterials surface modification and characterization. Other topics include analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials; tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; drug delivery, and cell-guiding surfaces.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 640/6240 - Nanoporous Materials (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Review of the field of nanoprous materials. Synthesis, characterization and surface modification. Adsorption and separation processes, biological and catalytic applications. Nanoporous materials for the removal of pollutants in the gaseous and liquid phases.

  
  •  

    NANO 642/6242 - Nanocatalysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the characterization and reactivity of nanoscale catalysts. Concept of nanocatalysis. Reaction Engineering. Modeling in Nanocatalysis. Nanocatalytic membranes for gas to liquid conversion. Nanocatalysis for dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons. Charge transport in Molecular and Nanoscale systems. Synthesis of Nanoceramic catalysts by chemical and physical routes.
     

  
  •  

    NANO 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.
     

  
  •  

    OPMG 202/2101 - Statistics for Business (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    Basic concepts and applications of statistical analysis in business decisions. Methods include probability, risk analysis, estimation, forecasting, analysis of variances, and regression analysis.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 310/3201 - Operations for Competitive Advantage (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or  

    Description
    How firms can gain competitive advantage from the operation function. This course introduces the basic concepts, tools and principles that are essential for the analysis and improvement of business processes. Topics may include forecasting, product and service design, capacity planning, quality management, materials management and project management.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 409/4102 - Quantitative Approach to Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Topics like the philosophy and techniques of operations research, the theory of probability, inventory models, utility and decision game theory, linear programming, queuing models, and simulation methods are emphasized.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 402/4202 - Production/Operations Management II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Current theory and practice in the planning, operating, and control of production/service systems. Topics include: production planning, purchasing and materials management, quality assurance, and productivity analysis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 403/4203 - Business Process Management and Simulation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Initiatives in quality (TQM), time-based competition, balanced score card, business simulation and business dynamics, including recent development in benchmarking and business process reengineering, with particular attention given to process management through supporting process design and improvement.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 404/4204 - Service Operations and Strategy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Service organizations are dominating the global economy in terms of GDP share and employment, this is even more acute in the Egyptian economy. As such, the need to know how to design, operate and analyze service operational systems is more crucial than ever. This course covers the basic principles behind the design and operation of service enterprises with focus on service facility design, location, demand management, yield management and service capacity planning. Industries which could be considered include tourism, hospitality, financial, health care and government operations.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 401/4301 - Supply Chain Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The integrative managerial issuzes and challenges related to developing and implementing a firm’s supply chain strategy. Attention is directed to the supply chain strategy mission confronted by varied types of business organizations.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 470/4970 - Special Topics in Production / Operation Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

    Description
    Considers selected topics of current relevance in Production / Operation Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 475/4975 - Independent Study in Production/Operation Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of OPMG unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Production/Operation Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    OPMG 507/5201 - Introduction to Business Statistics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides a basic introduction to statistics as applied to finance, business, and accounting problems. Conceptual understanding of the concepts is stressed. Students will learn both limitations of statistics and how to interpret results. Hands-on experience in applying the concepts using Excel and SPSS is an integral part of the course. Topics include graphical & tabular descriptive techniques, random variables and descriptive probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, and analysis of variance. Application areas used include finance (e.g., portfolio construction), operations (e.g., statistical process control), and marketing.

     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
  •  

    OPMG 520/5202 - Operations Management for Competitive Advantage (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides a basic understanding of manufacturing and service operations, and their role in the organization. Topics covered include process analysis, process capacity, quality management and control, forecasting, inventory control, lean operations, and planning and control. Topics are covered with emphasis on managerial, applications-oriented perspective.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    OPMG 521/5301 - Managing and Coordinating Supply Chains (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    Supply Chain Management (SCM) deals with the efficient and effective flow of goods, services, information and financial resources through a network of suppliers, transformation facilities, distribution sites and customers. The goal of this course is to understand how supply chain decisions impact the performance of the firm as well as the entire supply chain. This course covers the major issues in supply chain management, including: definition of a supply chain; role of inventory; bullwhip effect and information sharing; vendor-managed inventories and other distribution strategies; third-party logistics; managing product variety; information technology and supply chain management; international issues. SCM focuses on managing material and information outside of the factory walls including aspects of sourcing, product design collaboration, demand planning and forecasting, inventory deployment, distribution system design, channel management, procurement, and logistics. We explore order fulfillment strategies and the impact of the Internet on distribution and back-end supply chain processes. We also examine strategies for enterprise integration.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    OPMG 528/5302 - Managing Dynamic Projects (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    To compete successfully many organizations provide unique goods and/or services which are delivered via “projects.” These include the professional services firms that provide a broad portfolio of services supporting their clients’ projects. Even organizations that do not regularly engage in projects often utilize projects to enable organizational, process or technological change. In all cases effective management of projects is required in order to achieve the overarching project goal of customer satisfaction. The course focuses on strategies and tools useful in management of projects. Topics covered include efficient & effective management of tasks within individual project, project portfolio management. Managing distributed development, and common classification of project types.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    OPMG 530/5303 - Data Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course uses the Excel/VBA environment for developing models. Students will develop spreadsheets and write programs for forecasting, financial price simulation, option pricing, and financial statements. Add-ins are used for optimization, simulation, and decision analysis.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    OPMG 531/5304 - Stochastic Models in Managerial Decision Making (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course presents a normative approach to making decisions in one’s personal and professional life. The first half of the course introduces the fundamentals of decision analysis: probabilistic modeling, preference modeling and the Markov process, decision tree construction and rollback, the value of imperfect and perfect information. The second half of the course stresses how decision analysis is used in real-world practice. Topics include sensitivity analyses, influence diagrams, stochastic dominance, probabilistic encoding and tornado diagrams and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    OPMG 532/5305 - Operations Strategy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    In this course we examine how firms can develop a competitive edge via excellence in operations strategy formulation and implementation. We study how companies can design operations to compete based on cost, quality, flexibility, or service. We will also study different scenarios in which firms make structural strategic decisions; dealing with “hard” issues such as technology choice, capacity expansion, and factory focus; and infrastructural strategic decisions; dealing with “softer” issues such as quality management & benchmarking, and procedures for global sourcing & inter-functional coordination.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    OPMG 533/5306 - Business Dynamics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course introduces system dynamics modeling for the analysis of business policy and strategy. Students will learn to visualize and analyze a business organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. A common theme that runs through the course is the search for connections between the behavior of people (and groups) in organizations and the organizational trajectories they generate; and how interactions among physical, cognitive, social, and informational factors in various organizational settings lead to dynamic behavior over time. We will also introduce” management flight simulators” that allow us to experience the long term side effects of decisions, systematically explore new strategies, and develop our understanding of complex systems.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  
  •  

    OPMG 575/5375 - Independent Study in Operations Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of OPMG unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Production/Operation Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PENG 200/2011 - Introduction to Petroleum Geology (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Basic concepts of Geology; Uniformatization, Geologic Time, Plate Tectonics, Rocks and Minerals (Igneous, Sedimentary and Metamorphic), Minerals, Origin of Sedimentary particles, Sedimentary Transport, Depositional Environments (Continental, Transitional and Marine), Sedimentary Facies, Lithification, classification of sedimentary rocks, Mechanical behavior of the rocks, Stratigraphy (correlation, superposition, unconformity, faunal succession and relative age), Structure, folds and its types, faulting and their types.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 218/2411 - Electrical Engineering (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Electric circuit theory; Three-phase systems; circuit analysis; electrical insulation; electrical measurements; energy conversion; induction motors, switchgear and substation apparatus, electric heating, Acoustics.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 219/2413 - Fundamentals of Surveying (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Principles of plane surveying, methods of measuring distances, angles and difference in heights (levels); traverse computations, earthwork computations-Surveying Fundamentals, Survey Mathematics, Introduction to Leveling Heights Contouring, Area and Volume Computations.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 227/2415 - Materials Engineering (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Structure & properties of materials; Metals; Ceramics; Plastics; Phase Equilibria; Structure/Properties relationship; Materials Selection; Performance of materials in oil environment.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 301/3011 - Petroleum Geology and Exploration (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
     


     

    Description
    History of Petroleum Geology , Oil & Gas accumulation, Origin (Chemical, Biological, and Physical), Porosity, Source Rocks, Migration, Accumulation, Types of Traps (Structural Traps, Stratigraphic Traps, Hydrodynamic Traps and combination Traps), Timing and preservation of Traps, Subsurface Geology and mapping; well sitting (duties of well geologist, introduction to logging and formation testing), Oil and Gas Exploration (Seismic, Gravity and magnetic Methods), Exploration Risk and Analysis, Project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.

  
  •  

    PENG 302/3021 - Reservoir Rock Properties (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Core retrieving, handling and preparation, measurements of the Rock Porosity, permeability, saturation, electric properties, compressibility, and rock mechanics, surface tension, wettability, capillary pressure, relative permeability, formation damage, evaluation and remediation, flow units, concept and definition.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 303/3022 - Core Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or concurrent.

    Description
    Lab safety and core plug preparation, measurements of porosity, gas and liquid permeabilities, saturation, electrical properties of the rock, Dean stark and retort, surface tension (Amott Test), wettability, capillary pressure calculation, relative permeability.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring or fall.
  
  •  

    PENG 311/3111 - Drilling Engineering I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Properties of Reservoirs; Subsurface Pressure & Temperature; Conventional & Current Drilling Techniques; Drilling Fluids; Drilling Hazards & Safety; Hydraulics of Rotary Circulation & Penetration Rates; Casing; Cementing; Well Head Equipment, well planning and control, basic rig components, drilling bits, hole stability and problems, vertical and directional hole drilling
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 313/3112 - Drilling Engineering I Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or concurrently.

    Description
    This drilling lab will cover the following; lab safety, introduction to drilling machinery simulator, drilling Controls, drilling Operations & guidelines, data acquisition systems, hydraulics, blow out preventers (BOP), rate of penetration against drilling parameters and drilling well control. In addition, the students will be introduced to the state of the art drilling design software and well planning, well design, rig types, components, selection, drilling oil well, drilling bits, dull classification, hole problems, well control, well surveying, directional drilling and cost estimation
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 305/3211 - Reservoir Fluids (2 cr. + 1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or concurrent.

    Description
    Petroleum fluid properties, gas behavior, application of deviation factor to ideal gas law, fundamentals of phase behavior: bubble point and dew point curves, retrograde, characterizing the reservoir fluid, properties of reservoir fluids: formation volume factor, viscosity, solution gas-oil ratio, API gravity, specific gravity; and estimating gas, oil, and water properties from correlations, equations of state to predict PVT properties, applications of numerical methods and software, lab is to demonstrate PVT experiments and emphasize the concepts of petroleum fluid behavior under reservoir and surface conditions.

  
  •  

    PENG 331/3213 - Reservoir Engineering and Recovery (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Properties of Reservoirs, Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering, Classification of Petroleum Reservoirs; Oil and Gas Calculations; Oil Material balance equations, Gas material balance equations, Reserves; Principles of Fluid Flow, Single & Multiphase flow, In-compressible Fluid Flow, Flow in Porous Media, Unsteady State Diffusivity Immiscible frontal advance theory and its applications; Introduction to water flooding theory.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    PENG 333/3221 - Well Testing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       .

    Description
    Overview of the Diffusivity Equation for Well Test Analysis, Well Test Analysis (Build up and Draw down well testing); Variable Rate Testing; Well Interference Testing; Gas Well Testing, Design of Well Tests, drillstem (DST) test, multiple-well test, pressure derivative analysis.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring
  
  •  

    PENG 334/3222 - Reservoir Simulation and Well Testing lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or concurrently.

    Description
    Data Analysis and Modeling Exercises using the state of the art well testing and reservoir simulation software.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 320/3223 - Well Logging (2cr. + 1cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Methods of Well Logging, Basic Relationship of Well Logging, Spontaneous Potential Logs, The Resistivity Logs, Porosity Logs, Gamma Ray Log, Lithology logs, Well Log Interpretation Techniques, Lab exercise using the Electrical Properties System (EPS) equipment to simulate well logging tools measurement and obtain resistivity and formation factor from core plug. Also, the students will be introduced to the state of the art well logging interpretation software to perform exercises, logging objectives, basic petrophysical relationships, calipers, dipmeters, pressure and temperature logs, porosity determination, fluid saturation and Archie equation, cross plotting techniques, permeability relationships, reserve estimation, correlation between well logging and core data, nuclear magnetic resonance, latest techniques (LWD, logging on bit and geosteering), integrated formation evaluation, recommended logging program, introduction to cased-hole logging and case study.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    PENG 351/3225 - Natural Gas Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Phase Behavior of Multicomponent Systems; Differential and Flash Vaporization, gas reservoir deliverability, material-balance calculations and decline curve analysis, gas flow measurement, dehydration and gas sweetening processes, hydrate control.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 322/3311 - Oil and Gas Production (2cr. + 1cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Pressure Draw Down and Productivity; Flow regime in Vertical and Horizontal Pipes; Off Shore and Deep Water Production; Gas Lift Principles and Design; Well Inflow Performance; Naturally Flowing Wells; Vertical lift performance, Multiphase flow, Well Pumping Design and Analysis; Pumps; Gas Separation; Emulsions and Inhibitors; Field Measurements; Pumps; Exercises’ on analysis of the production systems using the state of the art software, nodal analysis, formation damage, stimulation, matrix acidizing, hydraulic fracturing, numerical analysis of petroleum production system.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 332/3315 - Well Completion and Workover (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Classification of completions, design, productivity, perforation, completion fluids and equipment, unstable formations and sand control, subsea completion (for offshore wells), workover operations, corrosion control, scale deposition, intelligent completion.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    PENG 361/3411 - Thermodynamics (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Fundamental Concepts and Definitions; Properties of Pure Substances; First and Second Law of Thermodynamics; Reversed Cycles; Reversibility and Entropy; Vapor and Gas Power Cycles.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 363/3413 - Heat Transfer (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Steady and Unsteady State Conduction, Forced and Natural convection, Radiation Heat Transfer and Solar Radiation, Heat Exchangers.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring
  
  •  

    PENG 373/3415 - Principles of Energy Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Basic energy calculations; material, mass, and energy balance; reaction rates during chemical transformations in energy systems. Energy storage; Regeneration.
     

    When Offered
    Offered fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 374/3420 - Corrosion and Oxidation Protection (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and  

    Description
    Corrosion theory; types of Corrosion; Oxidation; Wagner’s theory; gas solid reactions; Creep; Fatigue; Stress Corrosion; Hot Corrosion; Inspection; Corrosion and Oxidation Protection of Pipe Lines and Drilling equipment.; Underwater Protection.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 375/3421 - Hydrogen and Fuel cells (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Principles of electrochemical conversion; Hydrogen production; Chemical and physical storage; Multicomponent storage systems; Efficiency of hydrogen energy; Principles of fuel cell technology; Fuel Reforming; types and design of fuel cells; fuel cell materials; efficiency and emissions.

     

    When Offered
    Offered fall or spring.

  
  •  

    PENG 411/4121 - Drilling Engineering II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Controlled drilling, Drilling Hazards & Safety, Horizontal Drilling; Multilateral Drilling, Drilling Optimization; Hole Problems; Modern Drilling Techniques; Well Control, Offshore Drilling, principles of directional drilling engineering, new drilling technologies, well survey, MWD and LWD tools, state of the art directional drilling technology (horizontal, multilateral, relief wells), different directional trajectory using basic calculations , software for well trajectory.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall
  
  •  

    PENG 477/4123 - Drilling Fluids Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Definition and functions of drilling fluids, drilling fluid chemistry and rheology, drilling fluid design for carbonates, sandstone and shales, drilling fluid additives and chemicals, clay structure and shale problems, loss control material for complete loss circulation, types of mud systems and their characteristics, mud behavior at HPHT wells, calculation related to drilling fluid, hydraulics, mud surface equipment’s, and contaminations, hole problem in related to drilling fluid, formation damage and hole instability, mud design, mud selection, completion and workover fluid, air drilling in correlation with drilling fluid, smart fluid and nano-technology.

  
  •  

    PENG 461/4221 - Reservoir Economics, Management, & Risk Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Analysis of investment projects, reserves, depletion, regional and global legislation and taxation regulations, management functions focusing on planning, organizing, leading and controlling, production forecasts and reserves estimation, human resources development and people management; incentives, industrial risk assessment and management in terms of hazard, spill control, dose response, exposure, risk and uncertainty, and characterization.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 471/4223 - Reservoir Simulation and Modeling (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Reservoir simulation fundamentals, data required, model design concepts, simulation results interpretation, History matching, Field wide Simulation, Future performance prediction, Reservoir Management, and Optimization techniques using economic analysis.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    PENG 412/4311 - Enhanced Oil Recovery (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Fundamentals of enhanced oil recovery; Immiscible displacement, fractional flow and frontal advance; Overview of water flooding, patterns, mobility ratio and Recovery Efficiencies; water flooding reservoir heterogeneity, Stiles Method, Dykstra-parsons method, Craig-Geffen & Morse Method; polymer flooding, surfactant flooding, miscible gas flooding and thermal EOR, microbial EOR, technical challenges and futures techniques

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 451/4313 - Petroleum and Gas Transmission and Storage (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Pipe line transport, pipe line design, calculation of the pressure drop through the pipes, fittings, valves, and bends, pipe line construction, pumping and boosting stations, gas transmission lines, metering, pipe line automation, tanker and railroad transportation, pipeline safety, regulations, specifications of the pipeline for onshore and offshore networks, examples of international pipelines, pipeline operations and maintenance, crude oil storage type, temporary storage of crude oil, crude oil stock calculations.

    When Offered
    Offered every other semester.
  
  •  

    PENG 422/4321 - Petrochemicals (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Ethylene and propylene production, petrochemical products, thermoplastics, thermosetting resins, fertilizers from natural gas, gas to liquid processes, equipment design and calculations.

  
  •  

    PENG 423/4323 - Petroleum Refining (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Type and evaluation of crude, petroleum processing, material and energy balance, physical separation, distillation, absorption, cracking, reforming, chemical refining, sweetening, processing of petroleum gases, lubricating oil, refining schemes, refining equipment’s.

  
  •  

    PENG 462/4421 - Renewable and Alternative Energy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Principles of Renewable and Alternative Energy Systems: Wind, Solar, Biogas, Geothermal, Fuel Cells, and Hydrogen Technologies. Economic Aspects; Efficiency; Introduction to Nuclear Energy. Connection to Grid, Smart Grids and intermittency, Market liberalization.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 463/4422 - Energy conversion and materials (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Conversion of fossil, nuclear, biomass to fuel; Electrochemical conversion in fuel cells and photovoltaics; Criteria determining efficiency of energy conversions; Materials for energy applications including membranes, catalysis, electrodes, supercapacitors, and semi conductors.
     

    When Offered
    Offered fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 474/4423 - Energy and the Environment (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
        and  

    Description
    Energy use and energy patterns in modern society; Resource estimates; Engineering analysis of energy systems; Managing carbon emissions; Environmental impact and protection, Environmental remediation technologies. Supply and Demand of energy; Energy Scenarios and modeling; Energy Policy and Auditing; Sustainable development.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 470/4425 - Environmental Protection & Chemical Pollution (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Chemical Pollution, Combustion Emissions; Toxicity, and Poisoning; Environmental Management; Environmental Hazards; Industrial Pollution; Safety; Regional and Global Regulations and Certifications. Biologica Oxygen Demand, Health and Safety, Oil spills and disasters, selected Case Studies.

     

    When Offered
    Offered every other semester.

  
  •  

    PENG 472/4427 - Ground Water Hydrology and Contamination (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Underground Hydrologic Cycle; Aquifers; Ground Water Movements; Flow Lines and Flow Nets; Steady and Unsteady State Flow; Flow Problems; Oil Field Waters; Corrosion and Microbiological Problems; Scales and Sludge; Water Treatment and Disposal; Well Injection.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PENG 475/4428 - Greenhouse Technology and Emission Reduction (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and  

    Description
    Technologies employed to reduce CO2, CH4, and soot emissions from energy utilization; Advantages and limitations of technologies applied to reduce energy emissions; Efficient use of energy; Catalytic conversion; Greenhouse challenges; Emerging greener technologies; Capture and storage of CO2 ; Emissions from nuclear power; Reforming; Sulphur and sulphur scrubbers; Climate changes and green house gases; Energy efficiency in combating emissions NOFA (non fossil fuel agreements) Kyoto and beyond.
     

    When Offered
    Offered fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 476/4429 - Principles of Nuclear Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Introduction to nuclear engineering; Global and nationals energy requirements; Radioactivity; Atomic models; Fission and fusion reactor concepts; Neutron diffusion theory; Radiation protection and safety.
     

    When Offered
    Offered fall or spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 480/4920 - Special Problems in Petroleum and Energy Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor and department chair on the basis of a well-defined proposal.

    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of Petroleum and Energy Engineering may be assigned to individual students or groups. May be repeated for credit if content changes. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

  
  •  

    PENG 494/4930 - Selected Topics in Petroleum and Energy Engineering (3cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing.

    Description
    Petroleum Topics chosen from: Petroleum or Gas exploration, drilling production, simulation, recovery, and gas liquefaction. Field study including assessment, evaluation, feasibility and economic studies will be required.
    Energy Topics chosen from: Alternative Energy resources including solar, wind, biomass, fuel cells, nuclear or geothermal energy. Field study including assessment, evaluation, feasibility and economic studies will be required.
     

    When Offered
    Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 497/4950 - Industrial Training (1cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Completion of 110 credits including 18 credits in PENG.

    Description
    Each student is required to spend a minimum of eight weeks of industrial training in Egypt or abroad. A detailed report is presented and evaluated.

    When Offered
    Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 490/4980 - Senior Project I (1cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Senior standing.

    Description
    A capstone project. Topics are selected by groups of students and approved by faculty advisor. Topics must be related to applied industrial problems using an integrated engineering approach.

    When Offered
    Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PENG 491/4981 - Senior Project II (2cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Senior standing and  

    Description
    Continuation of the capstone project. Oral presentation and report submission required.

    When Offered
    Offered fall and spring.
  
  •  

    PHDE 691/6291 - Advanced Research Seminar (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Graduate Seminar I (BIOT 5940 ,CHEM 5940  ,CSCE 5940  ,ENGR 5940  ,NANO 5940  ,RCSS 5940  ).

    Description
    • All Ph.D. students should attend a common class. This class will be a series of general lectures having a broad interdisciplinary nature.
    • Each student should give a presentation in this series on a topic that shows how his/her capability of dealing with more than one discipline.
    • The student will be evaluated based on:
      • Reports submitted at the end of each class.
      • The quality of the presentation and the extent of diversity.
    • The first four lectures Will be given by faculty members or renowned researchers conducting diverse interdisciplinary research. This will give the students guidance on how to select their topics and how to link to other disciplines.
    • The maximum number of students who can register in the Ph.D. seminar must not exceed 10.
    • The Ph.D. seminar will be offered only once every academic year.

     

  
  •  

    PHDS 691/6291 - Advanced Research Seminar (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Graduate Seminar I ( BIOT 5940  ,CHEM 5940  ,CSCE 5940  ,ENGR 5940  ,NANO 5940  , RCSS 5940  )

    Description
    • All Ph.D. students should attend a common class. This class will be a series of general lectures having a broad interdisciplinary nature.
    • Each student should give a presentation in this series on a topic that shows how his/her capability of dealing with more than one discipline.
    • The student will be evaluated based on:
      • Reports submitted at the end of each class.
      • The quality of the presentation and the extent of diversity.
    • The first four lectures Will be given by faculty members or renowned researchers conducting diverse interdisciplinary research. This will give the students guidance on how to select their topics and how to link to other disciplines.
    • The maximum number of students who can register in the Ph.D. seminar must not exceed 10.
    • The Ph.D. seminar will be offered only once every academic year.


  
  •  

    PHDS/PHDE 601/6201 - Systems and Computational Biology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary study field that focuses on complex interactions in biological systems. A major goal of systems biology is the modeling and discovery of emergent properties, properties of a system whose theoretical description is only possible using techniques, which fall under the remit of systems biology. The course targets graduate students from various scientific backgrounds. This course aims to provide hands-on experience in computational systems biology by combining experimental data and mathematical modeling with emphasis on modeling of cellular pathways. Potential biomedical and biotechnological applications are introduced.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall.
  
  •  

    PHDS/PHDE 612/6216 - Design and analysis of Experiments (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    Learn how to plan, design and conduct experiments efficiently and effectively, and analyze the resulting data to obtain objective conclusions. Both design and statistical analysis issues are discussed. This course is intended for practical researchers and scientists from a variety of fields such as engineering, physics, chemistry, biotechnology, and biology. Applications from various fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, and biotechnology will be illustrated throughout the course. Computer software packages (Design-Expert, Minitab) to implement the methods presented will be illustrated extensively, and you will have opportunities to use it for homework assignments and the term project.

  
  •  

    PHIL 100/1010 - Reading Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this course we read philosophy in class, and therefore read it together. This classroom experience is learning to read in a new way, a careful way, the way of philosophy. Reading together, we open ourselves to understanding also in a new way. This course will not only prepare students for   , but also for any other course in philosophy that is based on the capacity to read, to interpret, and then to write philosophy.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective to major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 221/2010 - Informal Logic (3 cr.)



    Description
    Informal logic aims to analyze and improve argumentation and reasoning as they occur in everyday life, to identify logical fallacies, and to critically examine common techniques of persuasion. The course examines logically valid forms and rules of inference, introduces deductive and inductive methods in ancient and modern logic, and elaborates the nature of definitions, categories and judgments.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.
  
  •  

    PHIL 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 220/2100 - Philosophical Thinking (core curriculum requirement) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or concurrent (for students enrolled prior to Fall 2013).

    RHET 1010  (for students enrolled in Fall 2013 or later)

    Description
    This course concerns the human desire to know. It is, therefore, a course in learning how to understand and how to be understood. It teaches students to listen to what others say, interpret what others have written, and take responsibility for one’s own words. This is accomplished through reading texts of great intellectual distinction, patiently practising the art of interpretation without easy answers, and carrying out a sustained effort to write thoughtfully. This course encourages students to think independently, responsibly, and critically.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
  •  

    PHIL 224/2111 - Self and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    What is self ? What do we mean by ‘consciousness’ or ‘personal identity’ ? Is the self a social being, or is it an entity within society that stands apart from it ? Through selected readings drawn from the meeting-points and confrontations between philosophy and fields such as psychology, anthropology and sociology, this course investigates the nature of the self and its place within that plurality of selves we call society.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.
  
  •  

    PHIL 226/2112 - Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.)



    Description
    Many religions include an intellectual and theoretical component that can be investigated independently of the religion itself. This course examines and clarifies some themes that arise from the rational investigation of the intellectual component of religion. Topics may include: reason and religious belief, proofs of the existence of God, the nature of religious language, the problem of evil, mysticism as a form of knowledge, and theological paradoxes (omnipotence, omniscience and free will, etc.)

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 230/2113 - Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces moral philosophy, the attempt to provide systematic explanations of standards for human conduct. Can we determine what the right thing is for us to do? How does society set its normative rules? How is a normative discourse possible? Selected texts provide the relevant context in which these questions will be examined.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.
  
  •  

    PHIL 234/2114 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3 cr.)



    Description
    The social sciences do not consist simply of the application of the methodology of modern natural science to the study of society, but instead are grounded in philosophy, both historically and thematically. This course presents the basic philosophy and presuppositions from which the social sciences operate. The course is especially for students who major or minor in a social science and who need a philosophic background as a context in which the social sciences can be properly understood.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 238/2115 - World Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Description
    The goal of this course is to introduce students to the wider context of philosophy beyond the West. Philosophical issues and methodologies will be discussed as they have been addressed by classical philosophical texts and eminent philosophers of Eastern traditions.
    This course will offer an advanced introduction to philosophical thinking using this broader historical scope. Topics covered may include issues of ethics and action, knowledge and awareness, reality, truth, and value.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 242/2116 - Philosophical Anthropology (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this course we engage and explore various philosophical accounts of human nature. What are the unique features of the human being? Ever since Aristotle defined man as a rational animal, as the animal with language, or as a political animal, there have been various attempts at defining what is specifically human. Other philosophers have emphasized, in addition to rationality and an interest in public life, the religious dimension of human beings. These considerations lead to further questions: What is the good life, and what role do reason and passion play in it? Are human beings essentially selfish, or are we ‘hard-wired’ for altruism? This course comes to grips with these fundamental philosophical issues from a variety of places and periods.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    PHIL 258/2117 - Political Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to the history of political philosophy and addresses dominant issues central to political thinking in the Western tradition. Themes may include the question of justice, the exercise of power, the meaning of democracy, the freedom and rights of the individual, the circumstances of revolution, the roots of authority, and the role of violence. Course readings are drawn from figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Kant, Hegel, Nietzche, and Marx.

    When Offered
    Offered in alternate years.
  
  •  

    PHIL 312/3001 - Ancient Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Two philosophy courses or consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course explores some philosophical systems and issues characteristic of the earliest period of philosophy, especially fourth-century BC Greece. Typical figures discussed might include: Thales, Anaxagoras, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Parmenides, Plato and Aristotle; and also later figures from the Stoic, Epicurean and Neoplatonic traditions. Topics may include: early natural philosophy, the riddle of non-being, theories of intelligible form, the good-life theories of knowledge, and the nature of the human soul.

    When Offered
    Offered every year.
  
  •  

    PHIL 313/3002 - Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Two philosophy courses or consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course explores some philosophical systems and issues characteristic of the period commonly called the “Middle Ages”, from 500 CE to 1500 CE. Typical figures discussed might include: Augustine, Boethius, al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, Anselm, Maimonides, Ibn Rushd, Aquinas, Al-Ghazali, John Duns Scotus, William Ockham, and Suarez. Topics may include: reason and faith, divine command ethics, truth and meaning, theories of human nature, occasionalism, virtues and the soul, the problem of universals, free will, and illumination and knowledge.

    When Offered
    Offered every year.
  
  •  

    PHIL 314/3003 - Modern Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Two philosophy courses or consent of instructor.

    Description
    Philosophical progress played an essential role in the historical changes of the Enlightenment and the development of industrial society. This course focuses on some of the major schools and figures of Modern thought, which include Rationalists such as Descartes and Leibniz, Empiricists such as Locke and Hume, and/or pivotal thinkers such as Bacon, Rousseau, Hegel, Kant, and Marx.

    When Offered
    Offered every year.
  
  •  

    PHIL 316/3004 - Twentieth Century Philosophy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Two philosophy courses or consent of instructor.

    Description
    The twentieth century has been marked above all by a focus on issues of language and the constitution of meaning. This course will examine representative thinkers drawn from one or both of the traditions of analytic and continental philosophy.

    When Offered
    Offered every year.
 

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