Jul 30, 2021  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Published Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    MKTG 523/5303 - Sales Force Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course focuses on the strategic and tactical aspects of sales force management. The course is concerned with how to manage a sales force rather than with how to sell with the objective of maximizing the return to the organization. The emphasis in this course is on business-to-business rather than business-to-consumer relationships. Topics covered include salesperson effectiveness, deployment, motivation, organizational design, compensation, and evaluation


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MKTG 524/5304 - Global Marketing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course covers the environmental, organizational, and financial aspects of international marketing. It also describes the special marketing research, pricing, channels of distribution, product policy, and communication issues which firms face doing business in international markets. Further, this course examines the cultural, behavioral and legal challenges of entering and doing business in foreign markets. Decisions must be made regarding international marketing objectives, strategies and policies, foreign market selection, adaptation of products, and distribution channels of communications to fit each foreign market.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MKTG 526/5305 - Integrated Marketing Communication (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course focuses on a fully integrated approach to the marketing communication of products and services and on the major marketing communication decisions made by brand/communication managers. These decisions include mass media advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct response marketing, sponsorship and events, packaging, and personal selling. This course is designed to provide students with both a theoretical and applied understanding of how marketing communication messages are created to positively impact customer relationships and brands


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MKTG 530/5306 - Strategic Marketing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    The course addresses the relationship of marketing to environmental forces and other business functions. Principal topics include resource allocation, market entry/exit decisions, and competitive analysis. The course stresses on the analysis, planning, and implementation issues marketing managers encounter when they develop market strategies in competitive environments. This is done by case analysis of marketing problems and examining current developments in marketing practice. Topics include a focused review of competitor analysis, buyer analysis, market segmentation, and assessing business competitive advantages. Product portfolio issues are identified and marketing strategies developed, assessed and implemented.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally

  
  
  •  

    MKTG 575/5375 - Independent Study in Contemporary Topics in Marketing (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of MKTG unit head and Director of MBA Program.

    Description
    Readings and research on recent topics in marketing
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MOIS 305/2101 - Introduction to Information Systems/Technology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to information systems/technology and its applications for business students.  The course explores the computer base applications in the major functional areas of business including accounting, finance, marketing, production, and personnel.  It aims at the development of computer end-users and systems managers through a comprehensive coverage of business processes, systems concepts, systems types, applications software, database concepts, electronic commerce and competitive advantage.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 406/3201 - Management Information Systems and Database Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The course aims at defining a framework of management information systems with emphasis on the organization. It relates to a number of important organizational aspects such as the human and technological infrastructure and the needs and requirements of an organizational information system. The course also covers the relational database model, with special emphasis on the design and querying of relational databases and exploration of the relationship of database to the rest of the system.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 435/3301 - Introduction to Electronic Business (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The Internet, as a disruptive innovation, is changing the landscape of business operation. This course provides an introduction to the basics of modern business in a networked environment. Managers and decision makers need a broad understanding of the concepts, technologies, tools, techniques and strategies associated with electronic business to be able to exploit the business development potentials of the new information based society. The course focuses on important electronic business issues including the concept, marketing, advertising, strategy formulation and web development and related infrastructure issues, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of this form of business operation, the infrastructures in place to support this type of electronic business, and the global economy within which it takes place.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall & spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 466/3401 - Human Computer Interaction (HCI) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides a business-oriented approach to Human Computer Interaction (HCI). It merges theories and concepts with methods of design, evaluation, and implementation of any interactive business system such as enterprise resource planning (ERP), organizational decision support, project management, and other business applications. HCI combines educational and cognitive psychology, business administration, as well as ergonomics and computer science in designing the business system that can greatly increase productivity, help in decision making and gain marketing advantages. Students do not only study the theory and principles of HCI design, but also design an interactive system that enables the users to do tasks quickly and work in an environment of proficiency and satisfaction.

  
  •  

    MOIS 423/3501 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to the use of the geographic information systems (GIS) and its applications for business decision support. It builds working knowledge and skills in applying and managing GIS by focusing on business and people related issues. Students learn to set up geo-referenced databases, to design maps, to analyze data, to extract information. This course exposes students to the functional areas in the technology management stream and gives them a practical hands-on experience for business applications. By the end of the class students will have mastered sufficient introductory concepts and practical skills to use GIS for business decision making improvement.

  
  •  

    MOIS 432/3601 - Information & Decision Support Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course is targeted to senior MOIS students who want more expertise in developing, managing and using Decision Support Systems and applications. This course will examine the design, development and implementation of information technology based systems that support managerial and professional work, including Communications-Driven and Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS), Data-Driven DSS, Model-Driven DSS and Knowledge-Driven DSS.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall & spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 433/3701 - Marketing Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on the issues relating to the management and use of information systems in order to support marketing management decision-making with emphasis on the areas of products, pricing, distribution, promotion, systems analysis, and functional information systems. Students learn the importance of: (1) developing an effective data base; (2) conducting marketing research studies; (3) creating a marketing plan; (4) using data mining techniques to extract data from data warehouses and build prognostic models and (5) incorporating technology tools to develop marketing information systems and decision support systems.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall & spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 434/3702 - Financial Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The content of this course will vary to keep pace with changing business needs and information technologies that is an integral part of any business aspect in Finance. Topics to be covered will apply the theoretical concepts taught in Finance by practically using advanced information systems approaches.

    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 444/3703 - Accounting Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on application of information systems/information technology in the fields of accounting. It starts with the conceptual foundations of accounting information systems and information technology in general and covers control and audit. It also focuses on accounting information systems applications and explores the computerization of the traditional transaction processing cycles in detail. It requires the students to use their knowledge in accounting to analyze and design an accounting information systems.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 450/3801 - Strategic Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the links between the strategic issues of the organization and the role and implications of management information systems. The course focuses on the strategic impacts different information systems can have on productivity, performance, competitiveness and organizational growth.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MOIS 430/4202 - Business Information Systems Analysis and Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The Course emphasizes various elements related to business information systems analysis and development in the new digital economy. Doing business is not as usual as before with the use of innovative information and communication technology tools and techniques and this course intends to introduce students to the opportunities enabled by various business information systems within the information economy.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 477/4704 - Systems Integration (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course emphasizes the value of integration between information systems in modern organizations. This is achieved by having different computing systems and software applications are linked in seamless physical and/or functional integration. The main objective of the course is to provide students with clear understanding of the issues involved in systems integration. In this course, the concepts of developing information systems will be stressed while keeping the focus on strategies and methods for merging a set of interdependent systems together. The course will explore variety of tools and techniques for systems integration while at the same time tackling management best practices for system integration.

  
  •  

    MOIS 470/4970 - Special Topics in Management of Information Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

    Description
    Considers selected topics of current relevance in management of information systems.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 475/4975 - Independent Study in Management of Information Systems (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of MOIS unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Management of Information Systems.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 499/4999 - Internship and Graduation Project (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of all MOIS core courses.

    Description
    The course offers the students the opportunity to participate in real-life work experience in the IS/IT field. Students in collaboration with the MOIS unit will be responsible for their own placement in an internship approved by the advisor. Participating students will be required to select a project topic in MOIS according to their subject of interest and the availability of advisors. Subject areas include but are not limited to human resources, finance, marketing, electronic commerce and accounting. Students should submit a plan followed by progress reports and finally deliver the project document and presentation of the findings.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in courses is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in courses specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
  •  

    MOIS 508/5201 - Information Systems in Organizations: Management in the Information Age (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course examines design principles, information process modeling and analysis methodologies, as well as a range of underlying information technologies (e.g., transaction processing, data mining, data warehousing, knowledge management, and web server design) that will help the modern organization or community maximize its strategic objectives and business operations management. The course also demonstrates anecdotal success and failure cases as lessons for future IS projects


     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
  •  

    MOIS 549/5301 - Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    The purpose of the course is twofold. First, the course familiarizes students with the issues involved in conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining the kinds of large-scale, complex information systems required for commercial and governmental settings. Second, the course provides students with the experience working with different tools and techniques in systems analysis, design, and implementation. Special focus will be given to modern object-oriented design methodologies, Unified Modeling Language (UML), and modern Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
  •  

    MOIS 550/5302 - Information Technology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course surveys the building blocks of information technology including hardware, software, networks, and people and business applications while emphasizing an open systems approach that considers market trends such as globalization, time and information technology integration.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MOIS 551/5303 - Electronic Business: Doing Business in the Digital Economy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This course demonstrates how various information and communication technology tools and applications such as the Internet have created new business models, removed time and distance barriers, introduced new cost structures and redefined value chains relocating businesses from marketplace to market space. The course covers different models including business-to-business and business-to-consumer, in addition to strategy formulation, digital marketing strategies and advertising models, analysis and design of websites, infrastructure and security requirements, and economics of online transactions and applications.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MOIS 555/5305 - Information Strategy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    Information is an integral part in organizational success paralleling the importance of its technology component. This course explores the importance and value proposition of an information strategy and its relationship with other organizational strategies.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MOIS 517/5309 - Technology and Innovation Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    This is a case based course drawing on best practices in industry and the most up to date and important general management technology and innovation management academic material. Students should be prepared to discuss major technology issues covered in the readings each class. This course is designed to develop strong technology management skills to help managers make good decisions in regard to technology strategy and implementation of technology within their firms. This course is designed to develop general managers with strong abilities to lead in various technological environments and manage the innovation process and projects across and within their own function effectively.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and EENG 5272  .
  
  •  

    MOIS 570/5370 - Advanced Topics (Next Generation Technologies) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,     ,   and  .

    Description
    Conducting business in a networked economy invariably involves interplay with technology. The purpose of the course is to explore a number of next generation technologies, the business drivers of technology-related decisions in firms, and to stimulate thought on emerging applications for commerce (including disruptive technologies). The course provides an overview of various evolving technologies and culminates in discussion of potential business impact of these technologies in the near future.

     

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MOIS 575/5375 - Independent Research in Management of Information Systems/Technology (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of MOIS unit head and Director of MBA Program.

    Description
    Using the theoretical and practical skills acquired, students will be asked to conduct an in-depth study of an organization from an IT/IS perspective. Students should be using different resources available including material discussed in different courses, case studies, and textbooks but more importantly investigating different issues addressed with public and/or private sector organizations. A supervisor will be assigned to each student to guide him/her throughout the research process.


     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    MRS 504/5104 - Gender and Migration (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar provides an in depth engagement with the growing sub-field of Gender and Migration. Themes covered include: international gendered labor markets, migration to and from the Middle East, domestic labor, trafficking, displacement through conflict and development, remittances, and human rights. This is a joint course offered by the Center for Migration Studies and Refugee Studies and the Institute for Gender and Women’s studies.

     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .

  
  •  

    MRS 512/5112 - Psychosocial Issues in Forced Migrants (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course explores the psychosocial dimensions of forced migration including ethno-cultural concepts of well-being, sources of stress and coping, the impact of forced migration on child development, psychosocial consequences of torture and sexual victimization, and the interaction of trauma and bereavement.  Culturally appropriate mental health assessment, community-based intervention programs, methods of program evaluation, and ethical issues in working with refugee populations will be discussed.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in the spring
  
  •  

    MRS 507/5200 - Introduction to Forced Migration and Refugee Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the changing political, social, and legal context within which people become forced migrants or refugees.  Of particular concern are policies which generate, regulate, and protect the movement of forced migrants, the interaction between national governments and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the Psychosocial aspect of refugee status, and the social and cultural organization of refugee and migrant communities, including notably gender aspects and the role of children.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in the fall.
  
  •  

    MRS 518/5201 - International Refugee Law (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces the international refugee law regime and the background and historical context from which foundational concepts emerged. The bulk of the course is spent on the 1951 Refugee Convention and its Protocol, as well as the expanding mandate of UNHCR. The course considers some of the contradictions and dilemmas of international refugee law and takes into account, developments in related areas of international human rights law, international humanitarian law and migration law. This course is required for all students seeking the MA or Diploma in Migration and Refugee Studies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in the fall.
  
  •  

    MRS 500/5202 - Migration & Refugee Movements in the Middle East and North Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course offers a systematic review of international migration and refugee movements to, through and from, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) over the last decades.  It addresses their trends, causes and consequences for individuals and societies, and stresses the universality of international mobility determinants, but the specificity of the context in which they operate in the MENA, combining insecurity engendered by wars and civil conflicts with acute international inequalities of economic, social and political opportunities.

    The course starts with concepts and theories, then addresses the various facets of cross-border mobility in the MENA: voluntary and forced migration; migration and labor markets; financial transfers (remittances and investment) and migration; the mobility of skills and the brain drain / brain gain nexus; transnational communities, diasporas and their countries of origin; families and communities left behind; MENA states’ policies on emigration; integration of migrant and refugee communities; EU and Gulf states’ policies on asylum and immigration; transit migration; trafficking in migrants; return migration.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    MRS 501/5203 - International Migration & Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course provides an overview of recent literature and debates concerned with the relationships between migration and development.  Migration and development are related issues.  On the one hand, development is a determinant of migration.  International differentials in development, mainly economic (labor-, income- and capital-related), but also political (state- and society-related), will be reviewed.  These elements apply at the sending end as push factors (underemployment and unemployment; poverty; poor access to welfare; low rewards to skills; poor governance, political or civil instability, etc.) and at the receiving end as pull factors (jobs availability; higher incomes; social security; higher education; networks of previous migrants; etc.).  On the other hand, migration has an impact on development.  International mobility of workers and their family members can work for, or against, development.  Debates on the impact of development include the following:
    Destination Countries:
    Considering whether migrant workers compete with or complement local labor?  Do they reduce or increase average incomes/wages?  Contribute to or drain host country welfare services?
    Origin Countries:
    While migrant remittances provide for better housing, education and health of families left behind, their impact on the local and national economy is much debated.  Do they boost production or imports?  Do they create employment or deter entry into the local labour market?  Do they lead to sustainable patterns of development?  Do they further the access to credit of local communities and migrants themselves?  To what extent do migrants establish businesses as a result of their earnings abroad?  To what extent do governments foster development along with migrant communities and host countries with migration-induced development through confidence building, infrastructure and skills training?  Under what conditions does migration of skills result in a brain drain or a brain gain for sending countries?  In both sending and receiving countries, different patterns of migration: circular, return, temporary, permanent, regular/irregular may have different impacts on development.

  
  •  

    MRS 576/5204 - Methods of Research with Forced Migrants & Refugees: Issues in Forced Migration (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course complements other courses offered in the postgraduate Diploma in Forced Migration and Refugee Studies during any given semester by a critical examination of the particular problems and ethics of empirical research on forced migrants and refugees.  Students will undertake a group project using different types of research including historical, survey, ethnographic and focus group methods with a view to gaining first-hand experience in understanding the benefits as well as the problems and limitations of research in the field.

    When Offered
    Offered in the spring.
  
  •  

    MRS 505/5205 - Palestinian Refugee Issues (3 cr.)



    Description
    This inter-disciplinary course will be an opportunity for students to engage directly with the major practical and theoretical issues connected with Palestinian refugees, critically assessing the historical, political, legal and ideological forces that have shaped their turbulent circumstances.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    MRS 502/5206 - Comparative Migration Policies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Countries at both ends of the migration process develop migration policies that govern a variety of issue areas. In countries of destination, migrants essentially contribute to economic activity. Therefore, their policies address issues such as demand for migrant workers, admission criteria, recognition of skills, non-discrimination and integration of migrant workers and their families, curbing irregular migration, border control and patrolling sea lanes, the role of business and trade union and international cooperation. Countries of origin are mainly concerned with releasing pressures over their labor markets, the protection of migrants, their welfare, maximizing the contributions of migrants to development through financial remittances and their productive use, effective return migration policies, migration statistics, and international cooperation. The course will examine how a selected number of countries of origin and destination formulated and implemented policies in the respective areas of concern to the two sets of countries.

  
  •  

    MRS 503/5207 - Migrants & Refugees in the International System (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course attends to the consequence for the nation state and for the international system of migration and refugee movement. The course focuses on historical and contemporary population movements. By connecting historical and contemporary population movements to, among others, colonization, globalization, nationalism, citizenship, human rights and minority politics, the course interrogates the relationship between migrants, refugees, the nation-state, and the international system.

  
  •  

    MRS 508/5208 - Special Topics in Migration and Refugee Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics discussed vary every semester and depends on the instructor. The topic of the course will be announced prior to registration.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    MRS 513/5213 - Practicum in Psychosocial Interventions for Forced Migrants and Refugees (2 cr.)



  
  •  

    MRS 514/5214 - Psychosocial Interventions for Forced Migrants and Refugees (3 cr.)



  
  •  

    MRS 528/5228 - Migration in International Law (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores international law’s impact on state migration control, as well as its broader influence on the global phenomenon of migration. States and other actors have increasingly sought to manage aspects of migration at the international level to ensure orderly and humane control of population movements. This course examines the different ways in which international law engaged with migration through, amongst other things, general principles of international law, human rights and labor law, international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, as well as trade and environmental law.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    MRS 584/5284 - Practicum: Internship or Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of Advisor.

    Description
    Internship for four to six months in an organization working with migrants/refugees or active involvement on an institutional research project that examines elements of population movements. The work is assessed on the basis of a written report and discussions with faculty advisor.
     

  
  •  

    MRS 599/5299 - Research Guidance and Thesis (3 cr.)



    Description
    Supervision in the writing of the thesis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    MUSC 255/1010 - The Songs of America (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to popular American music via genre and performance. Study of discrete sets of American songs, drawn from the major genres of current popular American music, and identification of salient features of these genres.

    Notes
    Requires no previous musical training.

  
  •  

    MUSC 252/1011 - Vocal Methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    An overview of the skills required to sing well. Training in vocal production, some sight-singing, and study of songs chosen by the instructor and by the student.

    Notes
    Requires no previous musical training.

  
  •  

    MUSC 250/1012 - Guitar and Piano: Accompaniment and improvisation “by ear” (3 cr.)



    Description
    Students will acquire an understanding of the division of the octave into 12 semitones, and of basic related scales and chords. They will learn to play improvised song accompaniments on piano and guitar, and to develop more elaborate accompaniments over time.

    Notes
    Requires no previous musical training.

  
  •  

    MUSC 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students as part of the Primary Level Core.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MUSC 280-281/1800-1801 - Applied Private Instruction (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent: Students in MUSC 1800 must register concurrently in   , or achieve a passing grade on the placement exam. Students who have taken MUSC 1800 should register for MUSC 1801; those who have completed MUSC 2800 should register for MUSC 2801. MUSC 283 may be repeated for credit indefinitely. Music majors would normally register for MUSC 4800 after completing MUSC 2801.

    Description
    Private lessons in voice or an instrument. Twelve one-hour lessons in the semester. Students are expected to practice a minimum of one hour every day. Students will perform before a jury of teachers for the final examination. A lab fee will be assessed for each semester of instruction.

     

     

    Notes
    All students are required to meet with their teacher IN THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES. They MUST contact the Music Coordinator in the Department of the Arts’ Main Office by the first day of classes in order to arrange this. Students in MUSC 1800 may be assigned to a different teacher after this initial meeting, at the discretion of the Music Program.

  
  •  

    MUSC 180/1805 - How to Read Music (2 cr.)



    Description
    Instruction in how to read music.

    Notes
    Students taking   , Applied Private Instruction (2 cr) are required to take this course in the same semester, or pass the music literacy placement exam.

  
  •  

    MUSC 225/2000 - World Music (3 cr.)



    Description
    Study of the musical practices and cultures of representative diverse nations and peoples.

    Notes
    Requires no previous musical training

  
  •  

    MUSC 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    MUSC 220/2200 - Introduction to Music (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will consist of two parts.  The first is an introduction to the fundamental elements of music, including harmony, melody, timbre, rhythm and tempo, and texture, and to the instruments of the orchestra, voices, and choirs.  Students will also learn the elements of musical notation and how to read it.  The second is a short survey of great music in the western tradition, and of the composers who created it.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    MUSC 330/2300 - Introduction to Music Technology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Introduction to the study of acoustics and digital audio, music synthesis, MIDI, music sequencing, and basic recording techniques. Students will produce and record audio projects with available facilities.

    Notes
    Preference will be given to declared music minors. No prior musical training is required.

  
  •  

    MUSC 331/2301 - Music Production Using Protools I (3 cr.)



    Description
    After finishing this course, students will be qualified to apply for certification from Digidesign, the creator of Protools software, the industry standard. Students will learn to combine audio multi track recordings of live instruments with music instruments digital interface (MIDI) recording for arranging and composing, using software synthesizers and samplers (electric and real recorded acoustic instruments), and audio looping. Also, this course will develop essential techniques for recording, editing, and mixing. The software used to accomplish this will be Protools HD, Protools LE, and Protools M-Powered systems (v. 8.0.1), which are the market standard for digital audio workstation applications used for sound recording and mixing.

  
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    MUSC 232-332-432/2302-3302-4302 - Digital Audio / MIDI Lab (1 cr. each)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Students entering the course for the first time register in MUSC 2302. Students who have taken a semester of MUSC 2302 should register for MUSC 3302; those who have completed MUSC 3302 register for MUSC 4302.

    Description
    The course teaches the theory and practice of digital audio recording and editing, and music instruments digital interface (MIDI) composing and arranging, using a digital audio workstation (DAW) application and MIDI controllers. The DAW software used to accomplish this will be Protools HD , Protools LE, and Protools M-Powered systems (v.8.0.1), which are the market standard for digital audio workstation applications used for sound recording and mixing.

  
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    MUSC 333/2303 - Microphone Techniques (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    A brief history of microphone development and a general introduction to microphone theory and design, with an overview of wireless microphones. Detailed study of microphone polarity, frequency response, and amplitude ability, which are the features that define how the microphone captures sound and its suitability to different instruments. In addition, the course will study microphone placement, and microphone preamplifiers and accessories, in recording in studio and in live performances.


     

  
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    MUSC 240/2400 - Western Music Theory I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and MUSC 1800. Concurrent with  .

    Description
    Students will review the elementary concepts of pitch and rhythmic notation. The course quickly progresses through scale construction, pitch intervals, chord construction, and fundamental concepts of counterpoint and instrumentation. By the end of the semester, students will be able to compose two-part counterpoint, spell triads and seventh chords, and will begin to understand four-part notation and scoring.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    MUSC 241/2401 - Sight-Singing and Aural Skills I (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    Students will review the elementary concepts of pitch and rhythmic notation. By the end of the semester, they will be able to sing melodies in major and minor tonalities, articulate rhythms in simple and compound meters, and vocally arpeggiate triads and seventh chords. Students will practice dictation as well as aural skills.

    Notes
    Students must be able to match pitch within a 1-octave range.

  
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    MUSC 245/2450 - Arab Music Theory I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and MUSC 1800. Concurrent with  .

    Description
    Students will review the elementary concepts of jinses (Arab tri-, tetra-, or pentachord), maqamat (Arab music modes), and doroob (Arab rhythm) notation. The course quickly progresses through maqam construction, jins intervals, darb construction, and fundamental concepts of Arab music texture and instrumentation. By the end of the semester, students will be able to compose Arab music simple forms, spell jinses and maqamat, and will begin to understand maqamat families and how to modulate between maqam family members, and the takht (traditional Arab music ensemble) notation and scoring.

  
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    MUSC 246/2451 - Maqam I (Arab Music Sight-Singing and Aural Skills) (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and MUSC 1800 . Concurrent with  .

    Description
    Students will learn the elementary concepts of Arab pitch and rhythmic notation. By the end of the semester, students will be able to sing Arab melodies in different maqams, and articulate doroob in simple and compound meters. Students will practice dictation as well as aural skills.

     

  
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    MUSC 262-362-462/2620-2621-2622 - Arab Music Ensemble (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     must be taken concurrently with  

    Description
    The class will constitute a vocal and instrumental performing ensemble, which will rehearse during class periods.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    MUSC 2622 may be repeated for credit.
    Notes
    Rehearsal will lead to a concert performance of the music prepared.

  
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    MUSC 263-363-463/2630-2631-2632 - Guitar Ensemble (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    There are no pre-requisites for MUSC 2630. Students who have taken MUSC 2630 should register for MUSC 3631; those who have completed MUSC 3631 register for MUSC 4632. MUSC 4632 may be repeated for credit indefinitely.

    Description
    The class will constitute a performing ensemble, which will rehearse during class periods. Work will also include the techniques of playing, and some study of how to read music.

     

  
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    MUSC 264-364-464/2640-2641-2642 - Chamber Music Ensembles (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of the Director of the Music Program. Students who have taken MUSC 2640 should register for MUSC 2641; those who have completed MUSC 2641 register for MUSC 2642. MUSC 2642 may be repeated for credit indefinitely.

    Description
    Private coaching for a chamber music ensemble, normally of two to six players (rarely more). This may be a jazz combo, a takht, a percussion ensemble, or conventional chamber ensemble for Western art music (e.g. string quartet or piano-violin duo). Twelve one-hour coachings in the semester. Students will perform before a jury of teachers for the final examination. A lab fee will be assessed for each semester of instruction.
     

  
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    MUSC 265-365-465/2650-2651-2652 - Rehearsal/Performance Practicum (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of music faculty (required prior to registration).

    Description
    2652 may be repeated for credit.

    Notes
    A significant contribution to departmental concerts and recitals, or membership in the Cairo Choral Society, or other appropriate organizations approved by the Director of the Music Program.

  
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    MUSC 266-366-466/2660-2661-2662 - Chamber Singers (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the director.

    Description
    The class will constitute a chorus, which will rehearse during class periods. Work will also include the techniques of singing, and some study of how to read music.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    2662 may be repeated for credit.
    Notes
    Rehearsal will lead to a concert performance of the music prepared.

  
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    MUSC 267-367-467/2670-2671-2672 - Cairo Choral Society (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of the instructor. Students who have taken MUSC 2670 should register for MUSC 2671; those who have completed MUSC 2671 register for MUSC 2671. MUSC 2671 may be repeated for credit indefinitely.

    Description
    A community chorus dedicated to the study, promotion, and performance of the great choral works in the Western musical tradition. It presents performances with a professional orchestra (the Cairo Festival Orchestra) and soloists at various venues in Cairo. Students registered in this course will participate in all rehearsals and performances in the semester. (Students may also choose to join the chorus on a not-for-credit basis.)

     

  
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    MUSC 282-283/2800-2801 - Applied Private Instruction (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      . Students who have completed MUSC 1801 register for MUSC 2800, and those who have completed MUSC 2800 register for MUSC 2801. MUSC 2801 may be repeated for credit indefinitely. Music majors would normally register for MUSC 4800 after completing MUSC 2801.

    Description
    Private lessons in voice or an instrument. Twelve one-hour lessons in the semester. Students are expected to practice a minimum of two hours every day. Students will perform before a jury of teachers for the final examination. A lab fee will be assessed for each semester of instruction.
     

    Notes
    All students are required to meet with their teacher IN THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES. They MUST contact the Music Coordinator in the Department of the Arts’ Main Office by the first day of classes in order to arrange this. Students in MUSC 1800 may be assigned to a different teacher after this initial meeting, at the discretion of the Music Program.

  
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    MUSC 284-285-286/2850-2851-2852 - Private Instruction for Piano Proficiency (1 cr.each)



    Prerequisites
    There are no pre-requisites for MUSC 2850. Students who have taken MUSC 2850 should register for MUSC 2851; students who have register for MUSC 2851 should register for MUSC 2852.

    Concurrent : Students in MUSC 2850 with no prior experience, or who cannot read music, MUST register concurrently in MUSC 1805.

    Description
    Private lessons in piano, intended for music majors or minors whose primary instrument is not piano. Twelve one-hour lessons in the semester. Students will perform before a jury of teachers for the final examination. A lab fee will be assessed for each semester of instruction. 


     

    Notes
    1. Students registering in this course for the first time should enroll in MUSC 2850. 2. Students in MUSC 2850 with no prior experience, or who cannot read music, MUST register concurrently in

      . 3. All students are required to meet with their teacher in the first week o classes. They must contact the Music Coordinator in the Department of the Arts’ Main Office on the first day of classes in order to arrange this. Students in   may be assigned to a different teacher after this initial meeting, at the discretion of the Music Program.

  
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    MUSC 370/3099 - Selected Topics in Music (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Description
    Offered occasionally.

    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
  
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    MUSC 372/3110 - Diction for Singers in the Western Tradition (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MUSC 1800/4800  (at least two semesters) or permission of the instructor.

    Description
    Study of the fundamentals of diction for singing in German, French, Italian, and English. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), and perform repertory in these languages in class. Open to students outside the voice concentration, including nan-majors, with permission of the instructor; some prior study of voice is required, however.
     

  
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    MUSC 371/3150 - Western and Arab Musical Instruments (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Fundamentals of percussion, brass, woodwind, string, keyboard, and electric and electronic instruments in Western and Arab music. The course will explain how sound is produced in these instruments, looking at pitch and decibel ranges as well as playing techniques. Also, this course will examine the structure of music ensembles, from the orchestra and Arab takht to modern and contemporary ensembles in Western and Arab music.

     

     

  
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    MUSC 360/3200 - Music in the Western Tradition (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    The study of western music in its historical and cultural context, from its medieval roots to the present day, with an emphasis on representative great works and their composers.

  
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    MUSC 342/3250 - Music in the Arab Tradition (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Study of Arab music and song in its historical and cultural context, from its origins to the present day.

    Notes
    No previous experience in Arab music is required.

  
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    MUSC 334/3304 - Music Production for Visual Media (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
        and  

    Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to a range of techniques and technologies used in producing audio for visual media. The course will examine theory and practice used in music production for TV, film, web, video games, and art installations. Students will acquire skills in digital music production for visual media by working on projects which simulate actual professional productions. The course also provides the terminology of audio production and the basic theoretical framework upon which production skills can be built.

  
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    MUSC 335/3305 - Electronic Music (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    A study of the history of Electronic music, in brief prior to 1945, and in more detail thereafter, touching on the different schools of electronic music in Paris (Musique Concrete), Cologne (Elektronische Muzik), Milan, and America, the use of the Voltage-Controlled synthesizer, tape composition, live Electronic music, Rock and Pop Electronic music, and the Digital Revolution and MIDI. In addition to history, the course will explain Electronic musical instruments, forms, and composers.


     

  
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    MUSC 336/3306 - Sound for Picture Production (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course provides an in-depth, interactive study of sound and its relationship to picture. Topics will include post production areas relative to time code, synchronization, workflow, data interchange, sound recording and editing, lip-syncing and voice over tracks using ADR (Automatic Dialog Replacement), creating special effects with Foley, routing structures, sound mixing, and delivery methods. All of the above will be first described in class lectures and then applied practically in projects.

  
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    MUSC 337/3307 - Music for Film (3 cr.)



  
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    MUSC 340/3400 - Western Music Theory II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   . Concurrent with MUSC 3401

     

    Description
    Students will review the concepts of counterpoint and harmony. The course will cover instrumentation, phrase, tonic and dominant, embellishing tones, chorale harmonization and figured bass, phrase structure and expansion, diatonic sequence, and intensifying the dominant. Students will learn to analyze, compose, and write about music topics covered in class.

     

  
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    MUSC 341/3401 - Sight-Singing and Aural Skills II (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  . Concurrent with MUSC 3400.

    Description
    Students will review the intermediate concepts of pitch and rhythmic notation. By the end of the semester, they will be able to sing more complex melodies in major and minor tonalities, and develop their ability to perform simple and compound meters, aurally identify all intervals, and study phrasing, cadences, and the harmonic expansion of secondary chords.

  
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    MUSC 345/3450 - Arab Music Theory II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .
    Concurrent: Students in this course must also register for  

    Description
    Review of the instrumental and song forms of Arab music. The course will explore maqam construction, jins intervals, darb construction, and fundamental concepts of Arab music texture and instrumentation. By the end of the semester, students will be able to analyze Arab music instrumental and song forms and extract darbs and maqamat from them. In addition students will be able to compose Arab music, modulating between maqamat and changing darbs in the same piece.
     

  
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    MUSC 346/3451 - Maqam II (Arab Music Sight-Singing and Aural Skills) (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   . Concurrent: Students in this course must also register for  

    Description
    Study of pitch and rhythmic elements of Arab music at an advanced level. By the end of the semester, students will be able to sing complex Arab melodies in different maqamat and their families, and articulate and decorate darbs in simple and compound meters. Students will practice dictation as well as aural skills.
     

  
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    MUSC 311/3520 - Guitar Pedagogy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
        and MUSC 1800/4800.

    Description
    Preparation for a professional career that balances performance and teaching. Coursework will involve the analysis of guitar methods, technique manuals, and literature. The topics that will be addressed over the semester will include early childhood education methods and group instruction, as well as how to coordinate beginning, intermediate and advanced level private guitar lessons and studios for adults.
     

  
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    MUSC 402/3900 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Open to students with a minimum B average.

    Description
    In exceptional circumstances, some advanced music students may arrange, with departmental approval, to study beyond the regular course offerings.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
  
  •  

    MUSC 438/4308 - Music Production Using Protools II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    A continuation of Music Production Using Protools I. The course will teach students advanced sound engineering techniques. For example, students will learn how to adapt their workstation (including the rams, processor, and hard disks) to accommodate large recording sessions without facing problems of slow processing which can affect quality, by adjusting the playback engine and delaying compensation. Students will learn how to set time and tempo operations and key signature for composing and arranging songs using Protools, and how to upgrade the quality of the MIDI recorded tracks performed by amateurs into professional-quality output. The course will also explore different types of recording and advanced editing techniques, and develop essential techniques for using plug-ins in the mixing and mastering stages.

     

  
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    MUSC 439/4309 - Digital Mixing Techniques (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and  

    Description
    The course will examine the theory and practice of the music mixing process and mixing analysis, using a digital audio workstation (DAW) application, Protools v.8.0.1, currently the market standard. Students will study the different hardware (like studio monitors or speakers), software (i.e. the Protools application), and processes (like meters and signal flow), involved in digital mixing, the use of equalizers, dynamics processors, effects (reverb, chorus and delay) and pitch corrections, and the different types of panning, automation and bouncing of final mixes.

     

     

  
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    MUSC 440/4400 - Western Music Theory III (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   . Concurrent: students in this course must also register for  

    Description
    In-depth study of phrase rhythm and motivic analysis, tonicizing scale degrees other than V, modulation to closely related keys, binary and ternary forms, modal mixture and chromatic mediants and submediants, and the Neapolitan sixth and augmented sixth chords. Students will leave this course with ability to analyze, compose, and write about all of the topics covered in Western Music Theory I-III.
     

  
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    MUSC 441/4401 - Sight-Singing and Aural Skills III (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .  Concurrent: students in this course must also register for  

    Description
    Review of advanced concepts of pitch, harmony, and rhythmic notation. By the end of the semester, students will be able to sing melodies in all major and minor tonalities, articulate rhythms in simple, compound, and irregular meters, arpeggiate harmonic progressions include augmented and other predominant harmonies and modulation, and handle various chromatic techniques.
     

  
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    MUSC 480-481-482-483/4800-4801-4802-4803 - Advanced Applied Private Instruction (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MUSC 2801. Students who have taken a semester of MUSC 4800 should register for MUSC 4801; those who have completed MUSC 4801 register for MUSC 4802, and those who have completed MUSC 4802 register for MUSC 4803. MUSC 4803 may be repeated for credit indefinitely.

    Description
    Private lessons in voice or an instrument. Twelve one-hour lessons in the semester. Students are expected to practice three hours each day. Students will perform before a jury of teachers for final examination. A lab fee will be assessed for each semester of instruction.
     

     

    Notes
    All students are required to meet with their teacher IN THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES.

  
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    MUSC 490/4900 - Advanced Seminar (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    In-depth examination of special advanced topics in music determined by the special interest and expertise of the faculty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Designed for advanced students.

  
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    MUSC 492/4980 - Capstone Final Recital (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    MUSC 4802.

    Description
    Twelve one-hour private lessons in voice or an instrument, constituting final preparation for a solo recital at least forty minutes in length, of repertory chosen by the instructor, normally presented in the senior year. Students are expected to practice at least three hours each day. A lab fee will be assessed. The student must play the full recital as a juried exam with a grade of B or higher at least thirty days before presenting the recital. Students who do not achieve a grade of B or higher in the jury may repeat the course once for credit in order to qualify to present the recital, which is required for graduation with the B.M.A. The jury will also attend the recital and assign the final grade for the course.
     

  
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    NANO 501/5201 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics including the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, electron spin and addition of angular momentum. Qualitative and approximation methods in quantum mechanics, including time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, variational methods, scattering and semiclassical methods. Applications are made to atomic, molecular and solid matter. Systems of identical particles including many electron atoms and the Fermi gas.

     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.

  
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    NANO 502/5202 - Simulation and Modeling for Nanoscale Materials and Systems (3 cr.)



    Description
    Principles of modeling structures and processes at the nanometer scale, including meshing techniques, finite element analysis, and molecular dynamics. Simulation of Materials Science-based or Mechanics-based modeling methods employed; mechanical response of nanostructured materials; Modeling methods including electronic structure, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques are included.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 503/5203 - Advanced Testing and Characterization Techniques (3 cr.)



    Description
    Experimental techniques in the study of materials including quantitative measurements for the characterization of micro and nanostructured bulk and thin film materials using optical, electron and atomic force microscopy; Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford Backscattering (RBS); EDX; X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calometry for thermal analysis. Advanced and conventional testing techniques for characterization of the physical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of micron and Nanomaterials and devices.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 504/5204 - Fabrication of Nanomaterials For Films And Devices (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will cover different techniques implemented for preparing thin films such as chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition (evaporation, sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, electron beam, etc), and molecular beam epitaxy. In addition, different techniques for enhancing the physical properties of materials will be covered. This will include post-laser treatments, metal induced crystallization, thermal treatments, etc.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    NANO 505/5205 - Nanochemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to the basics of chemistry at the nanoscale, and would entail a general introduction to the nano world; physico-chemical considerations for properties at the nanoscale (band structures, typical and useful “nano effects” etc…); basic synthesis and fabrication methods for nano structures (top-down and bottom up approaches).
     

  
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    NANO 506/5206 - Management and Economics of Nanotechnology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will discuss various aspects of management and economics of nanotechnology. It would include: (1) Nanotechnology’s role in society and particularly within a fast changing world. (2) Nanotechnology is the next big driver of wealth creation within corporations and countries. (3) Product and Production Nanotechnologies, (4) Enhancing creativity and managing innovation in the context of nanotechnology. (5) Nanotechnology Life Cycles (The Curves of Technological Progress, Nanotechnology & Market Interactions and Products & Process Life Cycles)
     

  
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    NANO 521/5221 - MEMS/NEMS Technology and Devices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course will cover basic MEMS/NEMS fabrication technologies, various transduction mechanisms such as piezoelectric, pyroelectric, thermoelectric, thermionic, piezoresistive, etc. In addition, the theory of operation of few sensors will be covered this will include infrared detectors, radiation sensors, rotation and acceleration sensors, flow sensors, pressure and force sensors, and motion sensors. Finally, the course will give insight of different techniques for analyzing experimental data.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  ,  .
  
  •  

    NANO 522/5222 - Electronic Transport in Semiconductors (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will cover three main topics namely: Near-equilibrium transport in the presence of small gradients in the electrochemical potential or temperature, with or without the application of a small magnetic field.Physics of carrier scattering and how the microscopic scattering processes are related to macroscopic relaxation times and mean-free-paths. High-field transport in bulk semiconductors and “non-local” transport in sub-micron devices.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
 

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