Apr 21, 2019  
2011-2012 Academic Catalog 
    
2011-2012 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

The University


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Statement of Mission

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The American University in Cairo (AUC) is a premier English-language institution of higher learning. The university is committed to teaching and research of the highest caliber, and offers exceptional liberal arts and professional education in a cross-cultural environment. AUC builds a culture of leadership, lifelong learning, continuing education and service among its graduates, and is dedicated to making significant contributions to Egypt and the international community in diverse fields. Chartered and accredited in the United States and Egypt, it is an independent, not-for-profit, equal-opportunity institution. AUC upholds the principles of academic freedom and is dedicated to excellence.

Non-Discrimination Policy

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The American University in Cairo admits students regardless of race, color, religion, gender, disability or national origin with all rights and privileges to programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the university. The university does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, disability, or national origin in the administration of its academic policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. Accordingly the university does not tolerate any forms of discrimination and / or harassment including sexual harassment.


History

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The American University in Cairo was founded in 1919 by Americans devoted to education and service in the Middle East. For its first 27 years, the University was shaped by its founding president, Charles A. Watson. He wanted to create an English-language university based on high standards of conduct and scholarship and to contribute to the intellectual growth, discipline and character of the future leaders of Egypt and the region. He also believed that such a university would greatly improve America’s understanding of the area.

Initially, AUC was intended to be both a preparatory school and a university. The preparatory school opened on October 5, 1920 with 142 students in two classes that were equivalent to the last two years of American high school. The first diplomas issued were junior college-level certificates given to 20 students in 1923. At first an institution only for males, the University enrolled its first female student in 1928, the same year in which the first University class graduated with one Bachelor of Science and two Bachelor of Arts degrees awarded. Master’s degrees were first offered in 1950.

Originally, AUC offered instruction in the arts and sciences and in education. In 1921, the School of Oriental Studies was added to the University, followed in 1924 by the Division of Extension. This division was later renamed the Division of Public Service, and finally evolved into the Center for Adult and Continuing Education, which is now the School of Continuing Education. AUC’s high school division, known as the Lincoln School, was discontinued in 1951.

In 1956, the School of Oriental Studies was incorporated into the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as the Center for Arabic Studies. The English Language Institute was added the same year. After the Faculty of Education was discontinued in 1961 and degree offerings were dropped from the Division of Public Service, university-degree work was consolidated into a single academic structure, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Programs in sociology, anthropology, political science and economics were added to the curriculum, and the natural science offerings were significantly expanded.

Two applied research units, the Social Research Center and the Desert Development Center, were established in 1953 and 1979, respectively. Another landmark in the history of the University was the development of professional programs. The departments of engineering, computer science, journalism and mass communication, and management now offer several degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

In 1960, AUC enrolled approximately 400 academic students. By 1969, the University had more than tripled its degree enrollments to more than 1,300 students, including 450 at the graduate level. Since then, academic program enrollments have grown to 6,064 students (Fall 2008), including 1,047 students at the master’s level. Continuing education expanded simultaneously and now serves more than 42,179 individuals each year in non-credit courses and contracted training programs.

In 1993, the academic programs offered through 13 departments were organized into three schools: humanities and social sciences; sciences and engineering; and business, economics and communication. Educational training and major research projects continue to be carried out through the School of Continuing Education, the Management Center, Engineering Services, the Desert Development Center and the Social Research Center. Through subsequent reorganizations and additions, as of the Fall 2008 semester, the University has approximately 25 departments and institutes offering undergraduate, masters and graduate diploma programs.
Throughout its history, AUC has balanced a strong commitment to liberal education with a concern for the region’s needs for practical applications and professional specializations. Today, AUC emphasizes liberal education, and all undergraduate students study a common set of courses in the humanities and the natural and social sciences as part of the University’s Core Curriculum. In addition, the University maintains its strong commitment to fostering understanding across world regions, cultures and religions.

Accreditation

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In the United States of America, AUC is licensed to grant degrees and is incorporated in the State of Delaware. AUC is accredited in the US by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267.284.5000. AUC’s most recent reaccreditation was granted by the Commission of MSCHE on June 26, 2008.

In Egypt the university operates as a private cultural institute within the framework of the 1962 Egyptian-American Cultural Cooperation Agreement, in accordance with an implementing protocol with the government of Egypt. This protocol, promulgated as a presidential decree and ratified by the Egyptian People’s Assembly in 1975, recognizes the university’s degrees as equivalent to those awarded by Egyptian national universities.
 

Program Accreditation

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AUC’s undergraduate programs like computer science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, and the SSE construction engineering, electronics engineering and mechanical engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; Tel. 410-347-7700; www.abet.org). The English Language Institute is accredited by the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation (CEA 801 North Fairfax Street Suite 402A Alexandria, VA 22314 USA).

AUC’s School of Business holds accreditation for its business programs from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International, 777 South Harbour Island Blvd – Suite 750 – Tampa, - Florida 33602-5730). AUC’s School of Continuing Education is accredited by the International Association for Continuing Education & Training (IACET 1760 Old Meadow Road, Suite 500, McLean, VA 22102 Phone (703) 506-3275 Fax (703) 506-3266).
 

Governance and the Board of Trustees

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The university is governed by a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees, currently consisting of thirty-three members drawn from various fields of endeavor; the President of AUC is also an ex-officio member of the Board. In addition, there are twenty two individuals designated as Advisory Trustees, many of whom have rendered distinguished service on the Board in past years. The Board has its own by-laws and elects a chair for three years. A complete list of members, officers of the Board, and advisory trustees is provided in an appendix to this volume.

The Board meets generally three times a year; the May and November meetings are held in New York, and the February meeting is held on the Cairo campus. The Cairo meeting enables Board members to review developments first hand, and to meet with faculty, students and staff.

The Board of Trustees reviews and approves all major policies, the university budget and major facilities and program development plans. It sets the annual tuition rates and provides leadership in raising funds for the university. The university is administered by a president selected by the Board of Trustees. Mr. David D. Arnold continued as president until December 31, 2010. Lisa Anderson became president on January 1, 2011. The current president of AUC is Lisa.

The presidents of the university:

Name   Years of Service
1. Dr. Charles R. Watson (Founder)   1919-1945
2. Dr. John S. Badeau   1945-1954
Dr. Wendell Cleland (Acting President)   1954-1955
3. Dr. Raymond F. McLain   1955-1963
4. Dr. Thomas A. Bartlett   1963-1969
5. Mr. Christopher Thoron   1969-1973
Dr. Cecil K. Byrd (Acting President)   1973-1974
6. Dr. Cecil K. Byrd   1974-1977
Dr. Thomas Lamont (Acting President)   1977-1978
7. Dr. Richard F. Pedersen   1978-1990
8. Dr. Donald McDonald   1990-1997
Dr. Frank E. Vandiver (Acting President)   1997-1998
9. Dr. John D. Gerhart   1998-2002
Dr. Thomas A. Bartlett (Interim President)   2002-2003
10. Mr. David D. Arnold   2003-2010
11. Dr. Lisa Anderson   2011-present


AUC Faculty

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The faculty of AUC is a highly qualified group of academics and professionals who are committed to finding innovative ways to meet the educational needs of AUC students. The university’s full-time faculty is complemented by an extensive adjunct teaching staff, frequent visiting lecturers, and the Distinguished Visiting Professor program.

AUC’s full-time teaching faculty is primarily American and Egyptian, in addition to citizens from about a dozen other countries. By drawing from the national universities, business and professional communities and the Egyptian government, AUC has recruited a well-qualified adjunct faculty. These academics, business leaders, journalists, government officials, and professionals bring their practical experience to the classroom. The exchange of ideas also takes place on a more informal basis as academic departments and student organizations invite experts from a wide range of professional fields to give lectures and demonstrations during the weekly assembly hours and in the evenings.

To augment its educational and cultural offerings, the university established many years ago a Distinguished Visiting Professor program which brings to the AUC campus a number of eminent scholars, writers, and artists for short-term lectureships or workshops. Some of these professorships are supported by named endowments or annual grants in recognition of their importance to the university and the community.

Among the current named Distinguished Visiting Professorships are the Christopher Thoron Distinguished Visiting Professorship in Performing and Visual Arts, the Bayard Dodge DVP in Arabic Studies, Endowment DVP’s include the General Dynamics Corporation Distinguished Visiting Professorship in Engineering, the Charles J. Hedlund Distinguished Visiting Professorship in Business and Computer Science, and the McCune Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professorship in English and Comparative Literature.


Campus

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Cairo, the largest urban center in the Arab world and Africa, lies in the Nile Valley where it begins to broaden into the fertile delta. One of the world’s oldest cities, Cairo is inheritor and protector of many traditions — Pharaonic, ancient Greek and Roman, Coptic, Islamic and Arabic. It is, at the same time, a contemporary center for international development and Middle East policy.

The American University in Cairo is located in the suburb of New Cairo, about 45 minutes away from the University’s historic downtown campus, which is in Tahrir Square, near the National Cultural Center and the Egyptian Museum. AUC New Cairo, a 260-acre campus that opened in 2008, provides advanced facilities for research and learning, as well as all the modern resources to support a vibrant campus life.

The Abdul Latif Jameel Hall is home to the School of Business and the Kamal Adham Center for Journalism Training and Research. Facilities include executive training rooms, computer labs, fully equipped video editing and production labs, and specialized labs for graphics, multimedia, radio broadcasting and newspaper production. Home of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud Hall features labs for psychology and Egyptology as well as computer-assisted language labs. The AUC Center for the Arts houses an art gallery; a 300-seat mainstage theatre; labs for electronic music and photography; studios for drawing, painting, sculpture and theatre design; and studios for music and film editing and production. The School of Sciences and Engineering features spacious, sophisticated labs in every major scientific discipline and a range of specialized fields, from microbiology to systematics, from microprocessors to polymers, from energy systems to soils. Other highlights include an animal facility, greenhouse, herbarium and structural testing facility.

Creating a central location for services, the Campus Center provides students with a communal area to eat, congregate, organize trips and attend campus-wide events. Inside the building are a bookstore, gift shop, bank, travel office and the main dining room. Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta, who designed the Campus Center, likened it to a small village. Near the Campus Center is the student-housing complex. Nestled among palm groves, gardens and small courtyards, the residences create a private space that also encourages community building among students. Across the student residences sits the three-story indoor athletic complex, including a 2,000-seat multipurpose court, a jogging track, six squash courts, martial arts and exercise studios, a free weight studio and training courts. Outdoor facilities include a 2,000-seat track and field stadium, an Olympic-size swimming pool, a football field, a jogging and cycling track, and courts for tennis, basketball, handball and volleyball.

Housing one of the largest English-language collections in the region, AUC’s five-story library includes space for 600,000 volumes in the main library and 100,000 volumes in the Rare Books and Special Collections Library; locked carrels; computer workstations; video and audio production and editing labs; and comprehensive resources for digitizing, microfilming and preserving documents. In addition, on the plaza level of the library, the Learning Commons emphasizes group and collaborative learning. This unique area integrates independent study, interactive learning, multimedia and technology rooms, and copy and writing centers. Students can listen to music, watch a DVD, see a live performance or listen to a speaker while working on their assignments. They can also get walk-in assistance from the Writing Center’s satellite office or help with AUC’s online teaching and learning system.

Carrying forward a tradition of cultural outreach and education, the New Cairo and downtown campuses extend AUC even further into Egyptian society through a full array of public lectures, artistic performances and educational offerings. The historic palace building on the downtown campus includes a new branch of the AUC Bookstore, a café and the Margo Veillon Gallery for Contemporary Egyptian Art. With its campuses in New Cairo and Tahrir Square, AUC extends its reach, serves a broad community and renews its commitment to the past and future of the city and the region.


Profile: Fall 2010

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I. Academic Programs

Faculty 455 full-time, 383 part-time
    The full-time faculty:
      58% Egyptian  
      29% United States of America  
      13% Other Countries  
Students     6,553
    Undergraduate Degree 4,760
    Graduate Degree 1,224
    Graduate Diploma 15
    Non-degree 433
    Special Programs 121
Citizenship  
    Egyptian 5,534
    Other Countries 1,019

II. School of Continuing Education

Total number of individuals served during fiscal year 2009-2010   32,016

II. 2010-2011 Budgeted Operating Expenses: $175.190 million

Revenues   Academic Tuition and Fees   56%
    Endowments and Contributions   15.3%
    Auxiliary Enterprises   5.5%
    Educational Enterprises   10.8%
    Research   11%
    Miscellaneous   1.5%
Expenditures   Academic and Academic Support   44.8%
    Administration and General   18%
    Auxiliary Enterprises   6.3%
    Operations and Plant Management   15.7%
    Education Enterprises   7.5%
    Research   5%
    Contingency and Miscellaneous   2.8%


Financial Support

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The University was established and has been sustained throughout most of its history through the generosity of private individuals, the majority of them Americans. The founding trustees, mostly from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, donated funds to purchase the University’s main campus and to cover most of the salaries and expenses of the teaching staff. Despite the financial crises generated by the Great Depression, World War II, and the 1967 Six-Day War, neither the University’s academic programs nor its financial support has ever been interrupted.

For the first forty years, the Weyerhaeuser family and the Pittsburgh families of McCune, Gillespie, Lockhart, and Craig, with additional help from other individuals, covered much of the University’s operating deficits. Hill House was built and later renovated with funds donated by the Weyerhaeuser family in honor of William Bancroft Hill, a family member who chaired the University’s Board of Trustees for twenty years. Ewart Hall and Oriental Hall were also funded by private gifts during this period. The role of a number of American foundations, notably the Ford Foundation, has been significant to the overall development of the University. After the turbulent mid-1950’s such help strengthened several units including the Social Research Center, the English Language Institute, the Graduate Management Program, and the Desert Development Center. In subsequent years, other foundations and international agencies supported specific projects and research. They include the Near East Foundation; the International Development Research Center (Canada); the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; the World Health Organization; the U.S. Agency for International Development; the United Nations Development Program; the African Development Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education; the Fulbright Commission; the Tokyo Foundation (formerly the Sasakawa Foundation); the United Nations Children’s Fund; the Smithsonian; the AT&T Foundation; Schlumberger; the Amoco Foundation; the Mobil Foundation; Pfizer; the Mellon Foundation, the Starr Foundation, the Getty Grant Program and others.

During the 1950’s and 1960’s the nature of Egyptian-American relations impeded AUC fundraising efforts. The trustees’ long-range plans, however, indicated the need for the University to expand if it were to remain a viable institution. Thus in 1959, AUC for the first time obtained U.S. government funding through the Agency for International Development (AID). AID funds derived primarily from U.S.-owned surplus Egyptian pounds resulting from American wheat sales to Egypt in the 1950’s. This support allowed AUC to construct and equip its science building as well as to nearly double the size of its campus with the purchase of the nearby Greek community school. In the mid-eighties, AID had provided funds for the construction of a modern library on the Greek campus and for a dormitory in Zamalek that has been in use since 1991. AID also funded a campus-wide fiber optic network in fiscal year 1993.

The restoration of Egyptian-American relations in 1974, along with the establishment of Egypt’s Open Door economic policy, allowed AUC to set the process in motion for increasing its financial independence and security. Three major factors contributed to the success of this mission.

First, the University instituted gradual tuition increases. Now the largest source of income for the University, tuition accounts for more than fifty-three percent of AUC’s operating budget. AUC continues to provide tuition support for its Egyptian students, who comprise eighty-five percent of the student body, and offers both academic and need-based scholarships.

Second, in 1982, AUC launched a major fundraising campaign. The goal of the five-year campaign was to raise $22 million from private sources in the United States, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf states. Additionally, the University sought to develop a tradition of giving among alumni. In 1987, the University announced the successful completion of the campaign, having raised over $24 million. Not only did the University achieve its financial goal, but it also succeeded in increasing alumni participation. Among alumni donations was a major gift from a Saudi Arabian alumnus and his family to build the Jameel Center. Corporate sponsorship also increased, with significant support coming from American, Egyptian, Saudi Arabian, Italian and Japanese companies and foundations.

Third, the United States Congress passed legislation in 1985 that provided for the establishment of a trust fund at the American Embassy in Cairo with the income designated for AUC. Because the Egyptian pound was devalued in the years following the trust’s creation, further legislation was passed in 1989 to restore it to the original value. The income from this trust replaces Egyptian-pound support formerly provided through congressional appropriations. In 1997, the University received a second trust fund from USAID.

In 1993, the Board of Trustees approved a long-range plan that set University fundraising priorities for the following five years. The highest priorities were to increase annual giving and student scholarships and fellowships, enhance the quality of academic programs through the acquisition of chairs and professorships, build the endowment for library acquisitions, and obtain funding for the University’s newest facility: the Falaki Academic Center. The new center provides much needed classroom and laboratory space as well as theaters and galleries for art students’ performances and exhibitions.

In 1998, the Board of Trustees approved the purchase of a 260-acre area outside of downtown Cairo that will be the site of a new, integrated campus for AUC. Plans are underway to design and build this new facility.

Scholarships and Fellowships

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In addition to scholarships and financial aid provided by the University, many individuals and corporations demonstrate their commitment to higher education in Egypt by establishing scholarships and fellowships at AUC. Eligible students may apply at the Office of Student Financial Affairs at 20.2.2615.1487 or email the office at ekm@aucegypt.edu

Annual scholarships and fellowships are made possible through donors who contribute fund each year to fully or partially cover the tuition of one or more undergraduate and/or graduate student(s):

  • Ahmed and Ann M. El Mokadem Fellowship for Graduate Students: Established in 2010 to cover the expenses of two Egyptian students enrolled in the MA program in economics, business, political science and/or any other area of study as deemed advisable by the AUC president.
  • Ahmed and Ann M. El Mokadem Study Abroad Scholarship for Undergraduate Students: Established in 2010 to cover the expenses of two AUC undergraduates to study abroad for one semester.
  • Ahmed Bahaa Eldin Scholarship: Established in 2009 to cover all academic tuition, fees, books and accommodation for one student from Asyut for up to five years at AUC.
  • Al Mansour Public School Scholarship: Established in 2008 to support two students from Egyptian public schools.
  • AUC Faculty and Staff Public School Scholarship: Established in 2005 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • Bailey African Graduate Students Fellowship: Awarded to African graduate students, with preference given to Sudanese nationals.
  • BAT Public School Scholarship: Established in 2008 to cover academic tuition, fees and accommodation for a student from an Egyptian public school, with preference for a management major. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Caterpillar Foundation Scholarships: Established in 2008 and offered through the John D. Gerhart Center for Philanthropy and Civic Engagement as a partial scholarship to support students in their sophomore year or higher. Recipients should maintain a GPA of 2.8 or higher.
  • Citigroup Foundation Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support two students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Credit Agricole Egypt Public School Scholarship: Established in 2005 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • ExxonMobil Egypt Scholarships in Graduate School of Education: Established in 2010 to support no less than twenty teachers and administrators from the Egyptian Government Experimental Schools.
  • Faten Sabry Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support one student from an Egyptian public school. The recipient should demonstrate outstanding academic achievement and should maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • Fluor Corporation Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support two students from the Arab region majoring in either construction or mechanical engineering.. The recipients should maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Fund for Travel and Study Abroad: Established in 2008 to cover the expenses of ten Egyptian undergraduates to study abroad for one semester.
  • Garber Family Public School Scholarship: Established in 2008 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • General Motors Egypt Public School Scholarships: Established in 2005 to support one male and one female student from Egyptian public schools.
  • Globeleq Public School Scholarship: Established in 2005 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • Hadya Jameel MBA Fellows Program: Established in 2008 to support Egyptian or Palestinian students who hold a minimum GPA of 3.00, a very good (Gayed Geddan) or an equivalent ranking from other universities.
  • Hessa Fahad Al-Sidairawi Public School Scholarship: Established in 2009 to support one student from an Egyptian public school during his or her senior year at AUC.
  • Investcorp Scholarship: Established in 2001 to support a Bahraini student based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Mary Cross Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support two students from an Egyptian public school.
  • Mo Ibrahim Foundation Graduate Fellowship for Nubian Students: Established in 2007 to support Egyptian and/or Sudanese graduate students of Nubian origin. Applicants must demonstrate a working knowledge of the Nubian language.
  • Mo Ibrahim Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship Fund for Nubian Students: Established in 2008 to support Egyptian and/or Sudanese undergraduates of Nubian origin. The recipients should maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Mobinil Public School Scholarship Fund: Established in 2010 to support four students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Mohamed S. Younes Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • Nadhmi Auchi Young Arab Leaders Fellowships: Established in 2008 to support graduate students from the Arab region. The recipients should maintain a minimum GPA of 3.00 or very good (Gayed Geddan).
  • Palestinian Scholarship Fund: Established in 2001 to support Palestinian students from the Occupied Territories based on their financial need.
  • Piraeus Bank Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Piraeus Bank Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support a student of Greek origin.
  • Public School Scholarships Fund: Established in 2000 to support students from Egyptian public schools based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Queen Rania Al-Abdullah Scholarship: Established in 2007 as a partial scholarship to support female students from Jordan.
  • S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support two female students majoring in construction engineering.
  • Sheikh Jamal Jawa Scholarship: Established in 2007.
  • Suad Husseini Juffali Scholarship: Established in 2005 to support one deserving Palestinian student from Palestine or the Occupied Territories for up to four years at AUC.
  • Theodore L. Cross Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support two students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Thomason Family Public School Scholarship: Established in 2008 to support one student with an outstanding achievement in Thanawyya Amma. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • Tokyo Foundation Fellow Mobility: Established in 2007.
  • Tomooh Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support five students from among the top fifty Thanawyya Amma students graduating from Egyptian public schools.
  • Vodafone Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student majoring in business administration. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • Vodafone Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student majoring in engineering. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • Western Union Foundation Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support one student majoring in business administration. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • William Harrison Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support one student majoring in business administration. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Yousef Jameel PhD Applied Sciences and Engineering Fund: Established in 2010 by AUC alumnus, Mr. Yousef Jameel’68 ’08, to provide the initial funding necessary to help the university cover the SSE PhD program costs including fellowships, additional faculty positions, staff, equipment, materials and library resources in fields that may not be fully supported by expected research grants. In addition, the fund supports the recruitment of five additional graduate researchers per year until a sustained level of 25 is reached.

 

Endowed scholarships and fellowships provide in perpetuity partial financial support to deserving students. They are made possible by donations from many individuals, corporations and foundations committed to higher education in Egypt. Endowed scholarships and fellowships contributions are placed in income-producing funds, with the income used every year to help support one or more student(s).

  • ABB SUSA Scholarship: Established in 1994 to support one student majoring in construction engineering and on the Dean’s Honor List.
  • Alton and Barbara Harvill Scholarship: Established in 1990 to support an American student.
  • American Chamber of Commerce Scholarship: Established in 1992 to support one Egyptian student majoring in either business administration, management or economics based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowships: Established in 2000 to support American graduate students enrolled in the Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) program.
  • Apache Corporation Endowed Student Scholarship: Established in 2010 to support Egyptian students majoring in petroleum engineering.
  • Armenian Evangelical Congregational Church of Cairo Scholarship Fund: Established in 1999 through funds generated from the sale of the Armenian Church in Cairo to support graduate or undergraduate students of Armenian origin based on their financial need.
  • Ashraf Marwan Scholarship: Established in 1996 to support an Egyptian student based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • AT&T Scholarship: Established in 1987 to support Egyptian students majoring in engineering or computer science.
  • AUC Alumni Scholarships: Established in 1983 by the International Alumni Council, with collective gifts from AUC alumni in the Middle East, the United States and Canada, to support Egyptian and Arab children of AUC alumni.
  • Ayman Korra Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student from an Egyptian public school. The recipient must be enrolled in engineering and should maintain a high GPA.
  • BG Egypt Public School Scholarship: Established in 2009 to cover the tuition of one student from an Egyptian public school for his or her five-year study in the Department of Petroleum and Energy Engineering.
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb Egypt Scholarship: Established in 1997 to support students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb Scholarship: Established in 1985, and later increased in 1989, to support Egyptian students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • British Petroleum Scholarship: Established in 1991 to support a business administration senior who demonstrates academic excellence, with preference given to students with financial need.
  • Cairo Barclays Scholarship: Established in 1987 to support Egyptian students majoring in either business administration or computer science based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Citigroup Scholarship: Established in 1985 to support an Egyptian junior or senior majoring in either business administration or computer science who demonstrates leadership qualities and high academic standing
  • Colgate-Palmolive Scholarship: Established in 1987 to support an Egyptian student.
  • Credit Agricole Bank Scholarship: Established in 1988 to support one student majoring in business administration based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Cynthia Nelson Graduate Fellowships in Gender and Women’s Studies (IGWS): Established in 2006 in memory of the late Dr. Cynthia Nelson to support graduate students enrolled in the Gender and Women’s Studies program at AUC.
  • David Vernon Bullough Scholarship: Established in 1987 by Mr. and Mrs. Bullough in memory of their son to support Egyptian students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • DHL Egypt Scholarship: Established in 1986 to support an Egyptian student majoring in business administration. The recipient has the opportunity to intern at the DHL office in Cairo during the summer.
  • Douglas Horton Scholarship: Established in 1985 by the Horton family and friends in memory of Mr. Douglas Horton, Chairman of the AUC Board of Trustees from 1944 to 1961, to support an Egyptian student based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Dow Chemical Scholarship: Established in 1986 to support Egyptian students majoring in either chemistry or engineering based on their financial need.
  • Dr. Abdel Hamid El Sawy Scholarship: Established in 1985 by Dr. and Mrs. Abdel Hamid El Sawy ’72, AUC alumni, to support Egyptian students.
  • Dr. Aboul Fetouh Shahine Scholarship: Established in 1987 by Mohamed, Hussein and Hassan Shahine in memory of their father to support Egyptian students.
  • Dr. Akef El Maghraby Public School Scholarship: Established in 2003 to support talented students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Dr. and Mrs. A. Livingston Warnshuis Scholarship: Established in 1986 by family members in memory of Dr. and Mrs. A. Livingston and Ms. M. Chambers Warnshuis to support students based on their academic merit and financial need, with preference given to students from Africa and India.
  • Dr. Nabil Elaraby Fellowship: Established in 2007 to support one Egyptian student applying for or enrolled in the LLM program.
  • Galal El Zorba Public School Scholarship: Established in 2004 to support an outstanding student from an Egyptian public school.
  • General Electric Scholarship: Established in 1984 to support Egyptian students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Georgiana Stevens Scholarship: Established in 1982 by Mrs. Georgiana Stevens as a reflection of her deep interest in the Middle East and Cairo, this scholarship supports Egyptian students.
  • Ghaleb El Farouki Scholarship: Established in 1985 to support a Palestinian student based on his or her financial need.
  • GlobalSantaFe Corporation Public School Scholarship: Established in 2002 to support outstanding engineering students from Egyptian public schools based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • H.E. Mrs. Suzanne Mubarak Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Hayel Saeed Endowed Scholarship: Established in 1994 by alumnus Sheikh Abdul Rahman Hayel Saeed ’68 in commemoration of AUC’s 75th anniversary, this scholarship covers tuition, housing, board, textbooks, medical insurance and local medical services for four Yemeni students who meet the university requirements for admission.
  • Hermann F. Eilts International Scholarship Fund: Established in 2007 in memory of Amb. Herman F. Eilts, a member of AUC’s Board of Trustees, to cover the expenses of undergraduates enrolled in colleges and universities in the United States who have an interest in the Middle East to pursue Middle East studies, political science or history at AUC for one semester/year.
  • Hisham Ezz El Arab Endowed Scholarship Fund: Established in 2010 as a partial scholarship to support one student majoring in accounting, business administration or economics.
  • HSBC Bank Egypt Public School Scholarship Fund: Established in 2007 to support one student from an Egyptian public school who is enrolled in a finance related major such as accounting, business administration or economics. The recipient should maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • IBM Scholarship: Established in 1990 to support Egyptian students.
  • IPR Group of Companies / Dr. Mahmoud K. Dabbous Family Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • John and Gail Gerhart Public School Scholarship Fund: Established in 2002 in honor of Dr. John Gerhart, President of AUC from 1998-2002, to support students from Egyptian public schools.
  • John and Marguerite Harbert Scholarship: Established in 1986 by the late AUC Trustee John M. Harbert III and Mrs. Harbert to support one Egyptian student.
  • Johnson & Johnson Scholarship: Established in 1990 to support students majoring in management based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Magdy Tolba Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student from an Egyptian public school. The recipient should maintain a high GPA.
  • Mahmoud Muftah Scholarship: Established in 1991 by INCOGUM in memory of its marketing manager, Mahmoud Muftah, to support one Egyptian student majoring in business administration.
  • Major General Ahmed Arafa Public School Scholarship: Established in 2005 by members of the Ahmed Arafa family in memory of Major General Ahmed Arafa to support students from Egyptian public schools. The recipients should maintain a GPA of 3.4 or higher.
  • Mansour Group Fellowship (formerly MANTRAC): Established in 1989 to support a master’s degree candidate in business administration based on his or her academic merit.
  • May and Ahmed Heikal Public School Scholarship Fund: Established in 2006 to support ten students from Egyptian public schools.
  • Moataz Al-Alfi Scholarship: Established in 1998 by AUC Trustee Moataz Al-Alfi to support an Egyptian undergraduate enrolled in marketing courses.
  • Mohamed El Beleidy Scholarship: Established in 1985 by the late Dr. Mostafa El Beleidy in memory of his father to support an Egyptian student based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Mohammad Abughazaleh Palestinian Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support five deserving and talented students from the Palestinian Occupied Territories.
  • Mustafa Abdel-Wadood Public School Scholarship: Established in 2007 to support one student from an Egyptian public school. The recipient should maintain a high GPA.
  • Nadia Niazi Mostafa Fellowship in Islamic Art and Architecture: Established in 2001 to support a second year Egyptian graduate student in the Department of Arab and Islamic Civilizations who specializes in Islamic Art and Architecture based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • P&G Scholarship: Established in 1998 to support students based on financial need.
  • Parents Association (PA) Scholarship: Established by the 1997-1999 PA Board to support junior or senior students who face emergency situations and financial crisis during the course of their study at AUC.
  • PepsiCo Scholarship: Established in 1982 to support an Egyptian student majoring in business administration or marketing based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Philip Morris Mansour Group Scholarship: Established in 1995 to support students enrolled in programs at the School of Continuing Education based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • R. D. Matthews Scholarship: Established in 1982 in honor of the first four Americans who taught at AUC for a two-year term during the 1920’s, Mr. Roderic Matthews, Mr. Ralph Douglas, Dr. Earl Moser and Dr. Herbert Vandersall, this scholarship supports Egyptian students.
  • RAM Scholarship: Established by an anonymous donor in 1985 to support a Palestinian student majoring in engineering or computer science.
  • Raytheon Scholarship: Established in 1986 to support an Egyptian student in the engineering department.
  • Riad Kamal Palestinian Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support five Palestinian students.
  • Roger E. Tamraz Scholarship: Established in 1982 by former AUC Trustee, Roger Tamraz, to support an Egyptian student.
  • Santa Fe International Scholarship: Established in 1995 to support Egyptian students majoring in the humanities or social sciences.
  • Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowships: Established in 1993 to support graduate students in economics, public administration, the social sciences or the humanities.
  • Shell Scholarship: Established in 1996 to support an Egyptian student based on his or her academic merit and financial need.
  • Sheta Scholarship: Established in 1983 by Mohamed and Mona Sheta, the parents of two AUC alumni, to support Egyptian students.
  • Simpson Scholarships for the Junior Year Abroad Program in Egyptology: Established in 2003 to support five junior or senior undergraduates enrolled in the Year Abroad Program in Egyptology at AUC based on their academic achievement.
  • Stone & Webster Scholarship: Established in 1985 to support Egyptian students.
  • Taher Family Scholarships: Established in 2005 to support Palestinian students based on their financial need. Preference is given to those who intend to return to Palestine after graduation or engage in a future occupation that would assist in the economic development of the area.
  • Tarek Juffali Fellows Program: Established in 2010 to support graduate students studying international counseling and community psychology.
  • Thomas A. Lamont Scholarship: Established in 1998 by the Board of Trustees and friends in memory of Dr. Thomas Lamont who served AUC with distinction, both in his capacity as teacher and as senior administrator, from 1975 to 1998. The scholarship supports English and comparative literature seniors whose performance during the first three years demonstrates outstanding ability and excellent academic achievement.
  • Torgersen Scholarship: Established in 1993 to support Egyptian students in the sciences based on their financial need.
  • Vanessa B. Korany Scholarship in the Graduate School of Education: Established in 2009 as a partial scholarship to support two female students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Wafiya El Hassany Scholarships: Established in 1992 by AUC alumna, Mrs. Wafiya El Hassany ’48 ’50, to support one Egyptian male student and one female student, preferably Palestinian, based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Warner-Lambert Scholarship: Established in 1986 to support students based on their academic merit and financial need.
  • Wasef Jabsheh Jordanian/Palestinian Scholarship Fund: Established in 2006 to support students from Jordan or Palestine.
  • Wefaq Fahmy Public School Scholarship: Established in 2009 to cover tuition and books for a student from Egyptian public schools. The recipient should maintain a high GPA.
  • Xerox Foundation Scholarship: Established in 1986 to support Egyptian and foreign students.
  • Yahiya Arafa Public School Scholarship: Established in 2006 to support one student from an Egyptian public school.
  • Yasmina Scholarship: Established in 1990 to support Egyptian students.
  • Youssef Nabih Scholarship in Accounting: Established in 2004 to support the graduating senior with the highest GPA in the accounting department.
  • Youssef Nabih Scholarship: Established in 1987 to support students based on their academic merit and financial need.

 

Special Awards

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Contributions from donors provide a number of endowed and annual awards. Eligible students may apply at the departments where these awards are offered.

  • Abdulla Mohamed Lamloum’80 Prize in Economics: A cash award given to the highest-ranking graduating senior in economics.
  • Tewfick Pasha Doss ’77 Award in English Literature: An annual award given alternately to the best graduate thesis in English and comparative literature or political science.
  • Ahmed El Mehallawi Family Award in Outstanding Academic Achievement and Community Service: A semiannual cash award given to a graduating senior who has demonstrated excellent academic achievement and has enrolled in extracurricular activities including community service.
  • Ahmed Fakhry ’89 Award in Egyptology: A cash award given to the most outstanding Egyptology junior.
  • Ahmed Zewail HD ’93 Prize for Excellence in Sciences and Humanities: A semiannual cash award given to an honors graduate whose academic accomplishments demonstrate extraordinary commitment to the pursuit of scientific inquiry and the affirmation of human values.
  • Anand Mehta ’92 Award in MUN Participation: An award to support Egyptian students participating in Model United Nations (MUN) conferences abroad.
  • Bahgat Hassanein Award in Construction Engineering: A semiannual cash award given to the top-ranking student in construction engineering.
  • Beatrice and Roger Carlson Prize in Academic Merit: A cash prize given to a female student who has demonstrated academic excellence. The prize money is to be used for the purchase of books.
  • Dr. Abdel Rahman El Sawy Award: A semiannual award given to the graduating senior with the highest GPA in the engineering department who also received a Public School Scholarship Fund (PSSF) scholarship.
  • Duggan Memorial Fund for AUC Library Staff: An award given to provide training and development for library staff.
  • Frank G. Wisner Award for Scholarly Excellence: An annual cash award given to the graduate student who writes the best thesis on a topic related to modern Egypt.
  • Madalyn Lamont Literary Award: A cash award given to students with an outstanding creative achievement in poetry, drama, fiction or essay-writing.
  • Mohamed El Beleidy Academic Award: A seminannual cash award given to the graduating senior with the highest GPA.
  • Nadia Niazi Mostafa Award in Islamic Art and Architecture: An award given to a second-year Egyptian student enrolled in the Arabic Studies graduate program who specializes in Islamic Art and Architecture and wishes to pursue full time study in the program. The recipients should maintain a GPA of 3.2 or higher.
  • Nadia Younes Award for Public and Humanitarian Service: Established in 2004 in memory of Nadia Younes, this award recognizes the graduating senior who has exhibited the highest commitment to community and humanitarian service.
  • Naguib Mahfouz HD ’95 Medal for Literature: Established in 1997 to reflect the commitment of the AUC Press to bring the best Arabic literature to the attention of the widest possible foreign audience. This is an annual award consisting of a silver medal and cash prize given to the best contemporary novel published in Arabic and is presented by the AUC Press on December 11, the date of Naguib Mahfouz’s birthday.
  • Noreen Anwar Prize in English Writing: A cash prize awarded to the student with the best research paper in the Freshman Writing Program (FWP).
  • Parents Association Cup: A semiannual cup given to a graduating senior who demonstrated outstanding academic achievement and contributed to student activities.
  • President’s Cup: A semiannual cup given to students who achieved the highest GPA during their years of study at the university.
  • Reda Salama Prize in Literature and Science: Two annual cash prizes given to the best literature and best science students in the School of Continuing Education Secondary-School Program.
  • Samiha El Barkouky Award in Egyptology: An award given to a graduating Egyptology senior who demonstrated academic merit with a GPA of 3.3 or higher.
  • Vanessa B. Korany ’04 Award for Development and Creativity: Established in 2009, this is a cash award given to the best thesis proposal covering and integrating the fields of political science, economics, development, arts and education.

 

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