Dec 10, 2019  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    EENG 525/5225 - Digital Signal Processing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    Fundamentals of digital signal processing and filter design. Topics covered include Z-transform, Discrete Fourier transform (DFT), fast Fourier transform (FFT), finite impulse response (FIR) filter design, infinite impulse response (IIR) filter design, multirate signal processing, polyphase structures, short-time Fourier analysis, applications to communication systems and speech processing.

  
  •  

    EENG 556/5226 - Networked Control Systems Design & Applications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Introduction to Networked Control Systems, real-time systems, network architecture, wired and wireless network protocols, international standards, NCS in industrial control, NCS in terrestrial transportation systems, Study of different software packages and simulation tools for NCS.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    EENG 522/5230 - Stochastic Processes for Engineers (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Probability and stochastic processes with engineering applications. Topics include review of probability and sampling methods; modeling of random experiments; linear and nonlinear transformations of random vectors; discrete-time and continuous-time random processes including Markov processes; spectral analysis of random signals; estimation theory including Wiener and Kalman filtering;. A simulation project on selected applications will be given.

  
  •  

    EENG 520/5231 - Advanced Digital Communications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    or equivalent.

    Description
    Digital communications over noisy and dispersive channels. Topics covered include digital modulation over band-limited channels and Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI); partial-response signaling; continuous-phase modulation; pulse shaping; flat fading channels; time- and frequency domain equalization. Implementation complexity will be discussed and a simulation project is included.

  
  •  

    EENG 521/5233 - Wireless Communication Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Communication over wireless channels. Topics include indoor and outdoor propagation models and path loss analysis; time- and frequency-selective fading channels; Fading countermeasures including diversity, Rake, adaptive modulation and coding, and interleaving; spread-spectrum communications; synchronization; current topics will be discussed and wireless communications standards will be cited. Simulation projects and literature readings are included.

  
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    EENG 524/5234 - Enabling Technologies for High Date Rate Communications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    MIMO and space-time coding; multicarrier modulation, OFDM, OFDMA, and SC-FDMA; interference suppression; current and emerging topcis will be discussed. Wireless standards will be cited including 4G, WLAN/MAN/RAN. Practical receiver techniques will be discussed. Simulation projects and literature readings are included.


     

  
  •  

    EENG 526/5236 - Information Theory and Coding (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    Introduction to information theory and source and channel codes and their decoders. Topics include measures of information, entropy, and channel capacity in single and multiple antenna systems; Shannon’s source and channel coding theorems; Rate distortion theory; Linear block codes including Reed-Solomon codes; convolutional codes; Turbo codes and LDPC codes. Emphasis on decoder implementation and reference to usage of different codes in communications standards.


     

  
  •  

    EENG 530/5238 - Advanced Computer Networks (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    An overview of the internet layered architecture and functionality, network architecture classifications, advanced routing strategies with emphasis on state-of-the-art routing techniques, multimedia networking, quality of service (QoS) issues, securing network access via techniques such as VPN, some wireless building blocks of the internet-of-things e.g. MANET and WSN.
     

  
  •  

    EENG 541/5241 - Microwave Circuit Analysis and Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Microwave circuit theory and techniques. Emphasis on microwave integrated circuits (MIC). Maxwell’s equations, planar transmission lines, transmission line theory, impedance, scattering and transmission parameters, Smith chart, impedance matching, power dividers and directional couplers, active two port networks, devices for microwave amplification. Low noise amplifier design, power amplifier design, stability of microwave circuits.

  
  •  

    EENG 547/5247 - RF and Microwave Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    The general hardware components, system parameters, and architectures of RF and microwave wireless systems. Practical examples of components and system configurations. Communication systems are used to illustrate the applications. Design of basic RF transceiver systems. Requirements allocation to RF units.

  
  •  

    EENG 548/5248 - RF Integrated Circuit Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Introduction to RF terminology, technology tradeoffs in RFIC design. Architecture and design of radio receivers and transmitters. Low noise amplifiers, power amplifiers, mixers, oscillators, and frequency synthesizers.

  
  •  

    EENG 549/5249 - Antennas Design and Applications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or equivalent.

    Description
    Introduction to frequency spectrum, Maxwell’s equations, propagation in free space, infinitesimal dipole antennas, antennas parameters. Aspects of wired antenna will be covered: small dipole, finite length dipole, image theory, monopole, folded dipole, matching techniques, infinitesimal loop antenna, small loop antennas, and helical antennas. Review on rectangular waveguides, rectangular horn, equivalence theory, Love’s equivalence theory, H-plane sectoral horn, E-plane sectoral horn, pyramidal horn, parabolic reflectors. Two element array, uniform array, array factor, broadside and end fire arrays, phase scanning arrays, non uniform array, Binomial array, Dolph–Chebyshev array in addition to broadband antennas such as Yagi-Uda, log-periodic antennas. The course will introduce the fundamentals of microstrip antennas.

  
  •  

    EENG 570/5271 - New Product Design and Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course covers the following topics: Development Processes and Organizations, Identifying Customer Needs, Product Specifications, Concept Generation, Concept Selection, Concept Testing, Product Architecture, Industrial Design, Design for Manufacturing, Prototyping, Robust Design, Patents and Intellectual Property, Product Development Economics, Managing Projects. The focus of the course is integration of the marketing, design, and manufacturing functions to create a new product.

  
  •  

    EENG 571/5272 - Technology and Innovation Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is a case based course drawing on best practices in industry and the most up to date and important general management technology and innovation management academic material. Students should be prepared to discuss major technology issues covered in the readings each class. This course is designed to develop strong technology management skills to help managers make good decisions in regard to technology strategy and implementation of technology within their firms. This course is designed to develop general managers with strong abilities to lead in various technological environments and manage the innovation process and projects across and within their own function effectively.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and   .
  
  •  

    EENG 572/5273 - Strategic Management of Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Innovation is regarded as a critical source of competitive advantage in an increasingly changing environment. Innovation is production or adoption, assimilation, and exploitation of a value-added novelty in economic and social spheres; renewal and enlargement of products, services, and markets; development of new methods of production; and establishment of new management systems. This course will study the theory and practice of innovation as a process and an outcome based on a comprehensive model of innovation which consists of three determinants: innovation leadership, managerial levers and business processes. The course will examine the impact of accelerating innovation on cost, product quality and marketability; organizational changes required to couple R&D with marketing and commercialization; and the managerial skills and professional expertise needed to develop a sustainable innovation practice within an organization.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and   .
  
  •  

    EENG 573/5274 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Innovation lies at the heart of economic growth in the modern world. Entrepreneurs with the ability and resourcefulness to establish their own business are critical to the process of innovation. Innovation is not just about starting a new business but it is also about creating and developing Innovative ways of management. Whether you are thinking of starting a new venture or developing innovative mechanisms of management in a large organization, you will need to understand Entrepreneurship and Innovation.
    This course takes students through the various aspects of starting, managing, and growing a business. Whether you want to start a new venture, a new project, or develop an innovative way of management. You will need to write a business plan? This course will teach you how to write a business plan, its benefits and how does it differ from a feasibility study.
    Opportunity identification, clear business and market definition, segmentation, and entry, building a team and creating a suitable organizational form, avoiding common pitfalls, and various strategies for starting or growing a business , are among the numerous facets of entrepreneurship covered in the course.
    Methods employed include individual and group case analysis, writing a business plan, interviews with, and talks by, entrepreneurs, and profiling of successes and failures
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  /   .
  
  •  

    EENG 580/5910 - Graduate Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



  
  •  

    EENG 594/5930 - Advanced Topics in Electronics Engineering (3 cr.)



  
  •  

    EENG 590/5940 - Thesis Seminar I (1 cr.)



  
  •  

    EENG 591/5941 - Thesis Seminar II (2 cr.)



  
  •  

    EENG 599/5980 - Thesis



  
  •  

    EENG 661/6211 - Nanoscale CMOS (3 cr.)



    Description
    The increasing complexity of nanoscale CMOS technology imposes important constraints on the design of analog integrated circuits: while circuit performance using downscaled CMOS is largely improved in terms of speed, other analog figures of merit, such as transistor gain, are degraded. Reduced voltage headroom often requires the adoption of ultra-low-voltage techniques particularly in moderate inversion. Furthermore, variability is an important bottleneck impairing design in scaled technologies. The course covers issues ranging from technology and compact modeling aspects, to analog circuit design retargeting and methodologies for variability reduction using digital tuning, and optimization aspects on the system level.
     

  
  •  

    EENG 619/6219 - Design and Analysis of High-Performance Integrated Circuits (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Issues that arise in the design and anlysis of VLSI circuits at high speeds. Examples are: impact of variations, power management, static and statistical timing analysis, clock distribution and Model Order Reduction. The course will stress intuition in VLSI circuits rather than using blind trial and error approaches. Historic development in key topics and the current state-of-the-art status of these topics, enforcing scientific thinking and problem solving approaches using these real life examples.

  
  •  

    EENG 625/6235 - Detection, Classification, and Estimation Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Bayesian parameter estimation; linear least squares Estimation; Cramer-Rao lower bound; minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE); maximum likelihood estimation (MLE); Kalman filtering; statistical decision theory: Bayes, min-max, Neyman/Pearson, simple and composite hypotheses; optimum (map) demodulation; application to coherent communications, signal processing, and classification including coherent and non-coherent signal detection; M-ary hypotheses testing.

  
  •  

    EENG 694/6930 - Advanced Selected Topics in Electronics Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    Advanced topics selected from current developments in electronics engineering.

  
  •  

    EENG 622/6931 - Advanced Topics in Wireless Communications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course covers advanced and current topics in wireless technology: Practical issues in wireless receiver design including receiver gain optimization, noise figure and intermodulation products, and automatic gain control; Non-idealities in OFDM technology including phase noise, and frequency and phase offset. Selected current and emerging technologies are also covered. Simulation projects and literature readings are required.
     

  
  •  

    EENG 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.
     

  
  •  

    EGPT 199/1099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students as part of the Primary Level Core.

  
  •  

    EGPT 202/2020 - Ancient Egypt: An Introduction (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to history, society, religion, art and architecture of Ancient Egypt, including a description of the nature and character of the field of Egyptology. The continuing impact of Ancient Egypt on subsequent societies and cultures including that of modern Egypt will be examined.

    When Offered
    Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    EGPT 203/2030 - Introduction to Egyptian Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Only open to declared architecture majors and Egyptology majors.

    Description
    A basic class on Egyptian architecture, comprised of a brief introduction to the culture of the ancient Egyptians, followed by a series of lectures dealing with Egyptian architecture, the typology of Egyptian architecture, and the role it played in Egyptian society and culture. The raw materials and tools used by the Egyptians will be covered, as well as some of the motifs used in the buildings, and their ideas about architecture, including their use of light, water, and space in the buildings. The course includes sections on temples, tombs, and, with a brief discussion of urban planning. The course will conclude with a section on Egypt’s legacy to architecture, and how the use of the grammar of architecture changes over time. Field-trips will also constitute an important part of the course and will, in some cases, take the place of class-time.

  
  •  

    EGPT 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 204/2210 - Archaeology: Methods and Theories (3 cr.)



    Description
    The methods and theories of archaeological excavation and interpretation; archaeological evidence of human cultural development; archaeology as a social science.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 250/2250 - Ancient Egyptian Literature in Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course will analyze Ancient Egyptian literary texts -including folk tales, myths, wisdom literature and poetry- in order to present Ancient Egyptian culture through its literature.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 253/2251 - Hieroglyphics I (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces the student to the study of classical Egyptian script, grammar and hieroglyphic texts of the Middle Kingdom.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    EGPT 254/2252 - Hieroglyphics II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course is a continuation of   . Students will concentrate on the verbal forms of classical Egyptian.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    EGPT 301/3010 - Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Instructor’s consent

    Description
    The class examines Egypt’s history and geography and devotes special attention to the effect of geography and natural resources upon the development of Ancient Egyptian history, art, and civilization.
    Prerequisites instructors consent

     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 361/3201 - Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course covers the period between the Predynastic and the Middle Kingdom and includes: reliefs, statuary, architecture, and minor arts, illustrated with images. The class focuses on learning how to look at and to analyze Egyptian art and to place it in its context. This course involves a significant amount of memorization that enables the student to create a mental data-bank that is useful when putting excavated material in context and in analyzing Egyptian art. There will be field-trips to the museum and to Giza and Saqqara durign the semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 362/3202 - Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course covers the period betweem the Middle Kingdom and the Ptolemaic Period. It includes: reliefs, statuary, architecture, and minor arts, illustrated with images. The class focuses on identifying the basic principles of Egyptian art and architecture, learning how to look at and to analyze Egyptian art and to place it in its context. There will be field-trips to the museum and to other sites, possibly including Luxor, during the semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 343/3211 - History of Ancient Egypt I: Pre-Dynastic Through Middle Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the history of Egypt from the Predynastic period to the Middle Kingdom. The course focuses on the ‘official’ history of Egypt rather than the cultural/social history which is covered in a separate course. The scope of ‘official’ history includes: the rise of the Egyptian state, the different rulers of Egypt and their contributions to the state in terms of buildings, religious changes and foreign policy, the economy, social organization, and Egypt’s foreign relations. Literary souces will be augmented by archaeological evidence. Field trips to archaeological sites in the Cairo area are an obligatory aspect of the course.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 344/3212 - History of Ancient Egypt II: Middle Kingdom through Ptolemaic Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers the history of Egypt from the Middle Kingdom to the end of Pharaonic history. The course focuses on the ‘official’ history of Egypt rather than the cultural/social history that is covered in a separate course. The scope of ‘official’ history includes: the different rulers of Egypt and their contributions to the state in terms of buildings, religious changes and foreign policy, the economy, social organization, and Egypt’s foreign relations. Literary sources will be augmented by archaeological evidence. Field trips to archaeological sites are an important component of the course.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 403/4030 - Independent Study in Egyptology (1-3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent research projects in Egyptology, with consent of instructor and student’s adviser.

    When Offered
    Offered every semester.
  
  •  

    EGPT 440/4040 - Ancient Egyptian Religion and Ethics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.

    Description
    The course will examine in detail the beliefs and religious institutions of the Ancient Egyptians. Special attention will be devoted to official and popular religions, and to their manifestation in architecture as well as in the literature of Ancient Egypt.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 304/5100 - Culture and Society of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

      and HIST 2902  .

    Description
    The course identifies the basic structure of ancient Egyptian society and culture, and places special emphasis upon the interaction of economics, social organization, environment, law, politics, and religion.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    EGPT 510/5100 - Culture and Society of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course will cover the cultural, technological, and social history of ancient Egypt, with an emphasis on using primary sources and, if appropriate, experimental work. The subject matter covered includes the social organization of Egypt, the economy, agriculture, food, medicine, crafts, building methods, family structure, etc.



     

  
  •  

    EGPT 341/5110 - Egypt in the Late Period (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course will examine the factors that lay behind the collapse of the New Kingdom state and the rise of the Libyan and Nubian dynasties that dominated Egypt from 1200 to 332 BC. Special attention will be devoted to the last dynasties of the Pharaonic tradition (Dynasties XXI-XXX).

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 530/5120 - Graeco-Roman Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will explore the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 342/5120 - History of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Era (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course will study the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD. It will also examine the social consequences of the spread of Christianity in Egypt and the rise of Coptic culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 512/5130 - Art, Societies, and Cultures of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course provides students with an overview of the prehistory and early historical periods of the ancient Near East. Considerable attention is given to the fundamental transitions which occurred in this region. In particular, we will examine: (1) the first emergence of settled village life, hierarchical social organization and the domestication of plants and animals during the Neolithic period; (2) the rise of urban centers, temple and palace elites and writing; (3) the emergence and spread of the states and subsequent militaristic empires which became the dominant political force in the ancient Near East for several millennia. This course examines both archaeological and historical evidence with a heavy emphasis on material culture, primary archaeological and historical data and the process of scholarly interpretation.


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 346/5130 - Societies and Culture of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    The course constitutes a historical overview of the societies and cultures of Egypt, the Mediterranean world and the Middle East, from the emergence of urban society in Iraq in the fourth millennium BC to the rise and fall of the great empires of Babylon, Assyria, the Hitties, Achaemenid Persia, Greece and Rome. Special attention will be paid to the position of Ancient Egyptian civilization within the wider context of Ancient Near Eastern history.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 348/5140 - Societies and Cultures of Ancient Nubia (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent or of instructor.

    Description
    The course will survey the emergence of food-producing societies in Nubia and the Sudan from 6000 BC, and will examine the development of Nubian civilization from the Kerma culture and the kingdoms of Kush and Meröe to the advent of Islam. Special attention will be devoted to the interaction between Egyptian and Nubian civilizations.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 521/5140 - Societies and Cultures of Ancient Nubia (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is intended to serve as a broad survey of the development of history, culture and society in Nubia and the Northern Sudan from the earliest era of food production (ca. 6000-4000 BCE/BC) to the development of the medieval kingdoms of Nubia (ca. 600-700 CE/AD). Special attention will be devoted to the question of the relations — cultural, commercial, technological, political — between Ancient Egypt and Ancient Nubia. For the purposes of this class, the term “Nubia” will mean the long stretch of the Nile Valley that extends between the Nile’s First Cataract (located in Southern Egypt just south of the city of Aswan) and its Sixth Cataract (located in the Sudan some distance north of the city of Khartoum). The term “Nubian” will describe the people of this specific area as well as all the distinctive languages and cultures that flourished here from the beginning of recorded history to the early modern period.

  
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    EGPT 400/5150 - Introduction to Coptic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Coptic represents the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language. The course will include reading of selected texts in two Coptic dialects.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 505/5150 - Introduction to Coptic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or basic hieroglyphs.

    Description
    Coptic represents the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language. The course will include reading of selected texts in two Coptic dialects.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 353/5151 - Hieroglyphics III (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Students will read a number of Egyptian texts and learn how to translate and interpret written documents.

    When Offered
    Offered every fall.
  
  •  

    EGPT 500/5151 - Hieroglyphics III (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    Students will read a number of Egyptian texts and learn how to translate and interpret written documents.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered every fall.

  
  •  

    EGPT 401/5152 - Introduction to Hieratic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Hieratic is a script derived from hieroglyphics used mainly on papyrus. The course is a study of this script through reading selected texts literary, religious, or administrative- related to daily life in ancient Egypt .

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 402/5153 - Hieroglyphics IV (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The course consists of further reading of Egyptian texts with an introduction to the new Egyptian language of the later periods of Pharaonic history. In order to introduce students to epigraphy, they are required to copy and study texts from the Cairo Museum.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    EGPT 501/5153 - Hieroglyphics IV (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Hieroglyphics I-III or equivalent

    Description
    The course consists of further reading of Egyptian texts with an introduction to the new Egyptian language of the later periods of Pharaonic history. In order to introduce students to epigraphy, they are required to copy and study texts from Cairo Museum.


     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
  •  

    EGPT 445/5160 - Selected Topics in Coptic Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course allows instructors to offer a topic in Coptic Studies. The topic will be chosen from year to year in coordination with the departments concerned and the dean of the School of HUSS, and according to the individual interests and areas of expertise of the instructors. Topics chosen may include various aspects of Coptic art and history, monasticism, folklore, or other subjects.

    Cross-listed
    Same as , , , , and  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Repeatable
    The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.
    Notes
    Students in these majors may petition preferably before registration to have the course included in their major requirements.

  
  •  

    EGPT 539/5160 - Selected Topics in Coptic Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course allows instructors to offer a topic in Coptic Studies. The topic will be chosen from year to year in coordination with the departments concerned and the dean of the School of HUSS, and according to the individual interests and areas of expertise of the instructors. Topics chosen may include various aspects of Coptic art and history, monasticism, folklore, or other subjects.
    The course may be taken more than once if the topic changes.
    Students in these majors may petition preferably before registration to have the course included in their major requirements.

    Cross-listed
    Same as , , , , .
  
  •  

    EGPT 459/5170 - Selected Topics in Cultural Resource Management and Museology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course deals with different types of cultural heritage present in Egypt and their physical and cultural environment, and with the various methods of managing them in order to ensure their proper preservation while making them accessible to tourists and scholars. At the instructor’s discretion, the course may also provide an understanding of the role of museums in the modern world and the basic methodology and practice of museum management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 545/5170 - Selected Topics in Cultural Resource Management and Museology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course deals with different types of cultural heritage present in Egypt and their physical and cultural environment, and with the various methods of managing them in order to ensure their proper preservation while making them accessible to tourists and scholars. At the instructor’s discretion, the course may also provide an understanding of the role of museums in the modern world and the basic methodology and practice of museum management.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EGPT 540/5180 - Advanced Method and Theory: Archaeological and Historical (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This seminar is geared to providing a methodological basis and theoretical approach for both the disciplines of archaeology and history. More time and emphasis will be put on the archaeological, however, as it is the more basic discipline in Egyptology.

     


     

  
  •  

    EGPT 491/5191 - Field Work in Egyptological Method and Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor.

    Description
    Preference will be given to majors in Egyptology, anthropology, archaeology. Inquiries concerning the course must be made no fewer than seven months prior to the start of the summer semester for participation in archaeological and/or epigraphic fieldwork in Egypt. Sites and projects will vary.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    EGPT 591/5191 - Field Work in Egyptological Method and Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor.

    Description
    Preference will be given to majors in Egyptology. Field-work may take the form of epigraphy, excavation, survey, or museum work. Inquiries concerning the course must be made no fewer than seven months prior to the start of the summer semester.

     

    Cross-listed
    same as  .
  
  •  

    EGPT 519/5199 - Selected Topics in Ancient Egyptian Art and Culture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The topic of this course changes regularly and can be taken more than once. The subject matter chosen for the course can be any aspect of ancient Egyptian art, architecture, archaeology and culture.

     

  
  •  

    EGPT 499/5199 - Selected Topics in Egyptology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: junior standing and/or consent of instructor.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    EGPT 522/5220 - Ancient Egyptian Religion and Ethics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will investigate ancient Egyptian religious beliefs and practices, their origin, and development. The great mythic Solar Cycle of creation and Osirian Cycle of betrayal and revenge, death and rebirth are discussed, as well as the place of the myriad local and minor Gods and Goddesses within Egyptian mythology. The interaction of sacred and secular in Egyptian society is considered through the nature of divine kingship, large temple institutions, and funerary foundations. The relationship between the state cults and private worship by noble and commoner is explored, and the nature and potency of ancient Egyptian magic and curses investigated. The nature and development of Egyptian funerary beliefs are also detailed.

  
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    EGPT 525/5230 - Settlement and Daily Life in Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar introduces students to the material culture of the ancient Egyptians, specifically that of their settlements and daily life. The seminar concentrates on the archaeological evidence from settlements of the three most important periods of ancient Egyptian civilization: the Old, Middle and New Kingdoms. The seminar will first discuss urban settlement patterns in ancient Egypt, and secondly the processes by which material assemblages form in settlements. The plans and structure of dwellings will also be considered along with the material evidence found inside of them.


     

  
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    EGPT 526/5240 - Death and Burial in Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course will cover the funerary practices and beliefs of ancient Egypt from the Old Kingdom to the Graeco-Roman period. The subject matter covered will include the process of mummification and the spells used during the operation; the development of coffins, sarcophagi, amulets, canopic jars, canopic chests, shabtis, and other tomb furnishings; the evolution of the tomb, both royal and private, and any symbolic values that might be attached to the decoration and architecture; funerals, the cult of the dead, economic foundations supporting the tomb, and the religious rituals associated with funerals, the afterlife, and the mortuary cult. Experimental archaeology (mummification) might be involved in this class.

     

  
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    EGPT 532/5310 - Classical Art and Archaeology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the techniques and methods of Classical Archaeology as revealed through an examination of the major monuments and artefacts of the Greek and Roman world from Prehistory to the Late Empire. Architecture, sculpture, fresco painting, and the minor arts are examined at such sights as Mycenae, Olympia, Athens, Pompeii, and Rome.

  
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    EGPT 531/5320 - The Romano-Byzantine World and Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to familiarise students with the material and historical culture of the Late Antique and Byzantine periods, with an emphasis on the geographical area of the eastern Mediterranean and Egypt. This course includes direct experience with actual works of Late Antique and Byzantine visual culture.

  
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    EGPT 533/5330 - Coptic Art and Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of the instructor.

    Description
    A course designed to introduce students to Coptic art and architecture, with an emphasis on monasticism. Field trips are required.


     

  
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    EGPT 541/5420 - Material Culture: Looking at Artifacts in Context (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course will provide an overview of different types of objects from funerary, ritual, and quotidian contexts, with special museum sessions. It is designed to familiarize students with different types of material culture of ancient Egypt so that they can identify and work with objects confidently, in museums or on excavations.

     

  
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    EGPT 542/5430 - Site Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    This course is intended for students to learn about the history of a site in preparation for working at it, or on excavated material from it. They will choose sites and research its excavation history, as well as tracing back any documentation culled from the accounts of Eastern and Western travellers and historians. Understanding, using, and critiquing site reports will form part of the course, as well as learning to ask questions of the data. Site visits, local accounts, and modern imaging techniques should be used in order to understand and explore the past and present of the chosen site.
     

  
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    EGPT 560/5440 - The Iconography of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    A course In Egyptian art.

    Description
    The civilization of ancient Egypt left behind a vast material culture, both inscribed and decorated. An important part of a student’s understanding of ancient Egypt is to be able to recognize and understand the attributes and symbols recorded and depicted on ancient Egyptian monuments. This class is designed to draw upon students’ understanding of hieroglyphs, art and religion, and apply their knowledge to the comprehension of the iconography in tombs, temples, and in the minor arts.

     

  
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    EGPT 504/5510 - Advanced Hieratic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or equivalent.

    Description
    The class consists of more advanced readings from the different stages of the hieratic writing, the different hands encountered, and the different categories of texts. Although this course will focus primarily on Palaeography, the translation of these texts will also familiarize students with aspects of the culture they may not necessarily have come across as undergraduates. They will also enhance their training in grammar and improve their knowledge of the Ancient Egyptian Language in general.


     

  
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    EGPT 502/5520 - Introduction to Demotic (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Equivalency to advanced hieroglyphs.

    Description
    Demotic is a cursive script derived from Hieratic, and rooted in Hieroglyphics. It emerged in the 7th century B.C. and remained in use in parallel with Hieroglyphics and Hieratic, and later also with Coptic until the Byzantine Period, when the latter language took over. The Egyptian Language in its Demotic manifestation has further developed and new grammatical forms and vocabulary have appeared. In this class students will learn Demotic and work on a series of different texts.


     

  
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    EGPT 503/5530 - Introduction to Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
         or equivalent.

    Description
    Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs are mostly used for historic or religious texts of the Greco-Roman Period. Although the hieroglyphic signs are mostly known, the scribes assign different phonetic values to them based on a different system that needs to be understood and practiced. Religious texts in the Greco Roman Period are written in a more elaborate manner, with more details and explanatory glosses and are, therefore very important for a better understanding of Ancient Egyptian religion and its development across time.

  
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    EGPT 506/5540 - Advanced Coptic Texts (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Basic Coptic.

    Description
    An advanced course in Coptic that permits students to read a variety of texts. The subject matter changes regularly, and the course can be taken more than once as long as the material is different.

     

  
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    EGPT 561/5550 - Advanced Readings in Ancient Egyptian religion Texts (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
           

    Description
    This course is designed to study ancient Egyptian religious texts in depth, including their form, their content, their various usages, whether in temple rituals, in funerary religion, or in magical compositions etc. and the development of the religious expression across history. By the end of the course students should have learned about religion as well as modes of expression of certain beliefs, as well as grammatical structures unique to sacred forms of expression.

     

  
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    EGPT 562/5560 - Advanced Readings in historical literature from the Old Kingdom to the Late period (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
           

    Description
    This course is designed to cover readings from all period of Egyptian history to expose students to different types of historical literature, and to allow them to be able to select the period they prefer for further research.

     

  
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    EGPT 598/5991 - Research Seminar: Research Design and Writing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor.

    Description
    The course is intended to give students an opportunity to clarify and structure their thesis planning, particularly by way of identifying the major problem they wish to explore, its possible scope and dimensions, and justifying the theoretical perspectives and methodology appropriate for the purpose. This course will also ensure that students are taught the expectations and the culture of their specific academic discipline so that they can participate successfully in it.

  
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    EGPT 599/5992 - Thesis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of required coursework.

    Description
    For the MA degree in Egyptology a thesis of 25,000 words, exclusive of Bibliography and appendices is required on a topic that has been approved by the thesis committee. The committee should be made of the chief and second advisor. Additional advisors will be added if extra specialties are needed.

  
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    ELIN 98/0101 - Intermediate English (0 cr.)



  
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    ELIN 99/0102 - Advanced English (0 cr.)



  
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    ELIN 120/0301 - Intermediate English (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
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    ELIN 121/0302 - Advanced English (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
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    EMBA 601/5601 - Change Management and Global Transformation (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on planning, implementing and managing change in a fast-changing dynamic environment of today. It assists executives to understand challenges, tools, and burdens associated with initializing and implementing major changes in the organization. It addresses change efforts, reconstructing and reengineering and organizational adaptation decisions and developing action plans for making smooth transformation process and preventing resistance to change from employees and providing effective leadership of people in the organization.
     

  
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    EMBA 602/5602 - Team-work & Communication (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module focuses on team building and growth, performance, effective strategies for better group decision making, team leadership, resolving conflict within and across teams, evaluating and rewarding teams performance and developing a team-focused organizational culture. It aims at improving participants’ ability to lead high-performing teams through effective design and development. They will gain in-depth knowledge of practices of successful teamwork and will examine why other teams fail to deliver their expected results. They will learn how organizations can encourage innovation, strategic decision-making, and co-operation with other organizations through the use of teams and effective communication.
     

  
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    EMBA 603/5603 - Data Analysis and Analytical Decision Modeling for Optimizing Decisions (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on exploring the use of sample data, survey, regression analysis, decision models and statistical methods for estimating, predicting, and forecasting and making business decision. It will also include applications to total quality management, polling, employee attitude surveys, market research, operation and finance. It improves participants modeling skills, which are the key to success. Participants learn about weaknesses and strengths of quantitative models. It provides them with a reality check on the forecasts, enables ‘what if’ analysis and provides an integrated view of business, and is a key step in valuation.
     

  
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    EMBA 604/5604 - Managerial Economics (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module covers the basics of microeconomics (supply, demand, market price and output, production, cost and market equilibrium) and the international macroeconomics and monetary environment within which business operate. It provides intensive overview of economic analysis of firms, industries, markets, forms of competition, role of industry structure, the influence of government policies. It provides framework that participants use to understand the performance of international economies and financial markets, linkage among countries through trade, exchange rates and the balance of payment, business cycles and rescissions, inflation and deflation, and the effects of the governments’ macroeconomic policies.
     

  
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    EMBA 605/5605 - Strategic Accounting (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module addresses corporate financial reports as an important means of communication with investors and with managers in making tactical and strategic decisions. It focuses on the development, analysis and use of these reports and what assumptions and concepts accountants use to prepare them, and why they use those assumptions and concepts. It introduces basic costs concepts and develops techniques such as cost drivers, activity-based accounting, customer profitability, value-add and values chain analysis, and target costing. Other topics may include mergers and acquisitions, purchase and pooling, free cash flow and financial statement analysis, studies the nature, design and decision-facilitating role of cost systems and focuses on the effects of strategy, technology and the environment on cost system designs. Tools such as budgets, variance analysis, benchmarking, transfer pricing and balanced scorecard are used to illustrate planning, control and performance measurement systems that facilitate successful implementation of organization’s strategies
     

  
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    EMBA 606/5606 - Financial Management (2 cr.)



    Description
    It introduces the basic principles of finance. It addresses topics as discounting techniques and applications, evaluation of capital expenditure, estimating cost of capital, bond and stock valuation and investment decisions under uncertainty. Participants are expected by the end of this module to apply basic valuation formulas to standard financial instruments.
     

  
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    EMBA 607/5607 - Corporate Financial Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It analysis corporate financial decisions. It introduces the structure of markets, the evaluation of assets and concepts of risk-adjusted returns. It addresses essential topics as market efficiency, capital structure, dividend and stock repurchase policy, and firms’ use of options and convertible securities. By the end of this module, participants should be able to understand the underlying analytical framework for corporate finance.
     

  
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    EMBA 608/5608 - Talent Management, Coaching & Mentoring (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The act of management is all about amplifying the human capability of an organization. This module addresses the people side of business from a general management perspective. Within the context of newer thinking in “Talent management and Organizational Performance”, the module integrates concepts from strategy, organizational behavior, talent management, motivation, incentives, empowerment, leadership, organizational design, and transformation. It assist the participants in developing a deeper understanding of how human capability (talent) can be amplified or dampened by the enabling or disabling attributes of the intangible assets of a company (structure, leadership, culture, information, networks, beliefs, values, and reward systems); and it equips the participants with management practices, approaches and coaching and mentoring skills, that can be employed to optimize the various inter-related levers of talent and organizational performance.
     

  
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    EMBA 609/5609 - Managerial Decision Making and Operation Management (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module introduces operation from the general managers’ point of view rather than operation specialist. It approaches the integration, efficiency and effectiveness of managerial functions in support of development of the organization’s strategic goals, improving business decisions and achieving competitive advantage. It discusses operating systems: production process, process design and flow analysis, inventory concepts and models, time-to-market and responsiveness, project management, effects of uncertainty and waiting lines in producing an organization’s products and services. It focuses on quality management and statistical quality controls, as well as recent process-improvement ideas. Case studies are used to highlight central issues.
     

  
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    EMBA 610/5610 - Global Marketing Management (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module examines strategies over the product lifecycle including growth strategies for mature and declining markets, and defensive strategies. It addresses the importance of companies being market-driven and customer focused and presents current theories and practices of marketing management. Participants will be able to have an integrative strategic view of marketing, including the impact of globalization, information technologies and challenges to implement them.
     

  
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    EMBA 611/5611 - Competitive & Corporate Strategy (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    Corporate Strategy focuses on business policy by a firm and the development and implementation of a business strategy that will allow the firm to achieve its goals and objectives. Achieving these goals and objectives usually occurs within a competitive context, in which other rival organizations seek similar if not the same ends (e.g. market share, profits, control of scarce resources, etc.). How a firm stands against its rivals’ attempts and how it develops and implements a competitive strategy. Topics include industry analysis and competitive advantage as it derives from the firm’s strategic investments, resources allocation, and organizational coalitions.
     

  
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    EMBA 612/5612 - E- Business & Managers’ Toolkit (2 cr.)



    Description
    The module examines application of information resources and technology in organizations. The objective is to familiarize participants with key concepts in the use and management of Information Technology (IT). Topics covered include selected aspects of hardware, software, organizing data and information, telecommunication, electronic commerce, transaction processing systems, decision support systems, business intelligence systems and systems development. Participants will learn how do information technologies create value and affect the structure of competition.
     

 

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