Dec 11, 2019  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    FINC 515/5332 - Portfolio Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course blends portfolio theory with the type of practical issues that one will come across in the investment process. Topics include identifying investor objectives and constraints, recognizing risk and return characteristics of investment vehicles, developing strategic asset allocations among equity, fixed-income and risk-free assets, utilizing derivative securities to manage portfolio risk and, if possible, enhance portfolio return, and evaluating portfolio and manager performance relative to investment objectives and appropriate benchmarks. Investment tools, such as economic indicators and regression analysis will be introduced in computer labs.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 545/5333 - Private Equity and Venture Capital (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    The course focuses on private equity and venture capital cycles. Emphasis is placed on the valuation concepts and their application to privately held companies. Case studies are an integral part of the course.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 544/5351 - Corporate Financial Policy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This is an advanced corporate finance course with an emphasis on debt and equity management, security issuance, and distribution policy. Topics include descriptions of types of debt and equity, tradeoffs in the choice of an optimal capital structure; the role of capital structure in competitive strategy; the design of capital structure and securities to control information problems and limit conflicts of interest between different classes of security holders; procedures and costs of issuing securities including initial public offerings, and the determinants of optimal payout policy. The course is intended for those with career objectives in financial management, the corporate finance aspects of investment banking, or general management.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    FINC 517/5352 - Financial Modeling (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course shows how Learn to understand important mathematical models used in finance today including: (1) Deterministic Cash Flow Streams, (2) Fixed Income Securities: duration and convexity, (3) Term structure of interest rates, (4) capital budgeting, dynamic cash flows, (5) Additional options topics , and how to use state of the art optimization and simulation software including : (1)The Excel Solver for Optimization, (2) RISK for Monte Carlo Simulation, (3) Precision Tree for Decision Tree analysis, (4) The GAMS algebraic modeling language.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 514/5353 - Financial Risk Analysis (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course deals with the ways in which risks are quantified and managed by financial institutions. Among the topics covered are the nature of financial institutions and their regulation, market risk, credit risk, operational risk, liquidity risk, and the credit crisis of 2007.
     

  
  •  

    FINC 546/5354 - Financial Analysis, Planning and Valuation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    The course focuses on the framework, concepts and tools for planning business decisions and valuation. Topics discussed include forecasting financial statements, discounted cash flow techniques, alternative valuation methods and the implementation of capital budgets.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  
  •  

    FINC 575/5375 - Independent Study in Financial Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of FINC unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FINC 599/5401 - Thesis (6 cr.)



  
  •  

    FINC 590/5402 - Research Methodology (1 cr.)



  
  •  

    GREN 501/5201 - Global Changes and Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course is an introduction to the whole program. It focuses on sustainable development and global change- vital issues for humanity- with specific attention to the challenges in Egypt of the transition from unsustainable to sustainable development. Topics include rethinking established ways of production and consumption; types of green business, the interrelationship between local and global challenges, business policy and decision making affecting sustainability; finding new ways of greening economics, sustainable transportation, energy, engineering, architecture and construction; agriculture and water resources in a changing global climate; and the role of SMEs.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 502/5202 - Engineering for a Sustainable Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid, industrial and hazardous waste generation and control, with an emphasis on sustainable engineering practices such as environmental impact assessment and performance, waste management, pollution prevention, waste minimization, cleaner production, energy recovery, recycling and reuse.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 503/5203 - Core Concepts & Applications for Social & Environmental Policy (3 cr.)



    Description
    Overview of issues and analytic approaches for social and environmental policy, including programmatic and policy responses to development challenges in the environment, health and social services, and anti-poverty programming, with an emphasis on applications and case studies of experience in the Middle East and North Africa. Application of analytic methods to understand the root causes of barriers to providing social services and protecting the environment, and potential solutions to address these challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 504/5204 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Innovation lies at the heart of economic growth in the modern world. Entrepreneurs with the ability and resourcefulness to establish their own business are critical to the process of innovation. Innovation is not just about starting a new business but it is also about creating and developing Innovative ways of management. Whether you are thinking of starting a new venture or developing innovative mechanisms of management in a large organization, you will need to understand Entrepreneurship and Innovation.
    This course takes students through the various aspects of starting, managing, and growing a business. Whether you want to start a new venture, a new project, or develop an innovative way of management. You will need to write a business plan? This course will teach you how to write a business plan, its benefits and how does it differ from a feasibility study.
    Opportunity identification, clear business and market definition, segmentation, and entry, building a team and creating a suitable organizational form, avoiding common pitfalls, and various strategies for starting or growing a business , are among the numerous facets of entrepreneurship covered in the course.
    Methods employed include individual and group case analysis, writing a business plan, interviews with, and talks by, entrepreneurs, and profiling of successes and failures.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   /  .
  
  •  

    GREN 505/5205 - Environment and Society (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course uses a broad interdisciplinary approach to analyze the relationship between development and environmental degradation, the ways in which development enhances protection, and the issues of sustainable development. It covers the social movements that may emerge around the environmental concerns, and the social processes that lead to environmental risks.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    GREN 511/5211 - Water Desalination (3 cr.)



    Description
    Description of methods of water analysis and treatment. Study of the properties of water and aqueous solutions. Detailed discussion and analysis of design, maintenance, energy requirements and economics of the major processes of desalination, such as distillation, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 512/5212 - Design of Renewable Energy Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    .

     

    Description
    The world energy scene. Environmental impact of energy use. Wind power, PV and Solar Thermal Electricity and Biomass. Hybrid systems. Renewable energy generation in Power systems. Economics and sustainability.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

      .

  
  •  

    GREN 513/5213 - Solid and Hazardous Wastes Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid wastes – Nature, generation and collection. Local and regional management strategies including recycling and recovery of useful products, landfilling, and incineration. . Hazardous wastes – Nature, generation and collection. Risk assessment. Management strategies including source reduction, treatment, recovery, landfilling, and incineration.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   /  .
  
  •  

    GREN 514/5214 - Green Buildings (3 cr.)



    Description
    Climate change and the building sector, Environmental impacts of the Construction Industry, Concept of Green Buildings, different rating systems, Sustainable Sites, Energy and Atmosphere, Indoor Environmental Quality, Materials & Resources, recycling contents & VOC, Green Building for Existing Buildings, water efficiency, life cycle cost analysis, innovation on design.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 521/5221 - Marketing Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    Highlights the role of marketing as a process for creating value and managing customer relationships. The course addresses the marketing challenge of designing and implementing the best combination of marketing variables to carry out a firm’s strategy in its target markets. Further, this course seeks to develop the student’s skills in applying the analytic perspectives and concepts of marketing to such decisions as: segmentation, targeting, positioning, branding, pricing, distribution and promotion. The goal is to understand how the firm can benefit by creating and delivering value to its customers and stakeholders. The new role of marketing is emphasized including: stakeholder marketing, internal marketing, social marketing, customer relationship management and other recent trends in the market. This course takes an analytical approach to the study of marketing problems of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 522/5222 - Strategic Management of Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Innovation is regarded as a critical source of competitive advantage in an increasingly changing environment. Innovation is production or adoption, assimilation, and exploitation of a value-added novelty in economic and social spheres; renewal and enlargement of products, services, and markets; development of new methods of production; and establishment of new management systems. This course will study the theory and practice of innovation as a process and an outcome based on a comprehensive model of innovation which consists of three determinants: innovation leadership, managerial levers and business processes. The course will examine the impact of accelerating innovation on cost, product quality and marketability; organizational changes required to couple R&D with marketing and commercialization; and the managerial skills and professional expertise needed to develop a sustainable innovation practice within an organization.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   and EENG 5273  .
  
  •  

    GREN 523/5223 - Managing in a Dynamic Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Managing in today’s ever-changing dynamic environment is a challenge. To ensure competitiveness and sustainability, managers would acquire new skills and knowledge. This course covers topics such as management fundamentals, managing the local and global environment, emotional intelligence, organizational learning, ethical considerations, and value pluralism in management.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 524/5224 - Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    It is a basic business finance course, dealing with various aspects of financial decision making. It provides an introduction to time value of money; bond and stock valuation; ratio analysis; financing decisions; capital budgeting; cost of capital; capital structure; risk and return; dividend policy; operating and financial leverage; and working capital management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 531/5231 - Policy for Sustainable Cities (3 cr.)



    Description
    Explores policy choices facing urban managers, planners, and the communities they serve with regard to putting cities on a path to sustainability. Considers how allocation of, control over, and use of key land and financial resources shapes urban development from political economy, governance and space planning perspectives. Examines participatory planning and other methods to engage urban stakeholders in management of cities as well as tools to promote adoption of green technologies in the urban housing, industrial, transport, power, water, and commercial building sectors.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 532/5232 - Greening the Built Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examines core concepts, analytic tools, and program models needed to develop the urban built environment in ways that are socially and environmentally sustainable. Gives particular attention to retrofitting and sustainability upgrades for the existing urban core, developing new communities on a sustainable model, and providing affordable options for low-income urban residents, including upgrading of informal areas as well as new developments. Explores how the spatial distribution of work and housing choices interacts with transport/transit systems, energy use, and infrastructure to shape urban sustainability outcomes.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 533/5233 - Urban Infrastructure Development for Sustainability (3 cr.)



    Description
    Considers how the development of critical infrastructure (power generation and transmission, water/wastewater, transport/transit, and waste management) can be directed toward socially and environmentally sound and economically viable models. Provides an understanding of alternative infrastructure financing, regulation, and implementation models from state provision to public-private partnerships. Explores how infrastructure network choices shape city expansion, urban quality of life, and efficiency outcomes in a dynamic urban context.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 534/5234 - Egyptian Environmental Law (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will give you a broad practical understanding of the Egyptian environmental law. The course is designed to introduce you to the fascinating variety of important environmental challenges addressed by environmental laws, the difficult policy issues surrounding environmental problems, and the legal complexities of environmental regulatory and administrative schemes. Environmental laws can be extremely complex. This course, however, gives you the foundation by covering the “fundamentals” of Egyptian environmental law. You will also develop some critical analytical and research skills (such as analyzing problems and reading statutes) that are transferable to all areas of environmental law.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 541/5241 - World Systems and Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    Theories of the growth of the new international division of labor and its relationship to socioeconomic change in both developed and developing societies.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    GREN 542/5242 - Modern Social Movements (3 cr.)



    Description
    The emergence of modern social movements based on such issues as gender, ecology, race, ethnicity, community control, and identity. The relation between “new” social movements and earlier social movements based on class, national liberation, and revolutionary transformation, with comparison between First and Third World movements.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  
  
  •  

    GREN 543/5243 - Revisiting the Rural (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines the remaking of rural communities in relation to historical shifts in capital and state dynamics, the organization and practice of everyday life, the politics of labor and property, and the production of desire and subjectivity.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    GREN 544/5244 - Cities: Structure and Dynamics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The structure of urban forms, patterns of city life, and the relationship of cities to the wider societies of which they are part.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GREN 571/5251 - Graduate Thesis Seminar I (2 cr.)



    Description
    Seminar on multi-disciplinary research topics, research methodology, thesis writing, and presentations given by invited speakers. Speakers from different backgrounds and experiences will be invited from the involved schools as well as the international partners.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 572/5252 - Graduate Thesis Seminar II (1 cr.)



    Description
    Seminar on research plans given by students to discuss their thesis topics and the results they obtained in their works. In the case of twinning thesis, students should organize together the seminar. However, every student should provide a presentation on his/her part of the research.
     

  
  •  

    GREN 573/5253 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr. + 3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. It must be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.
     

  
  •  

    GWST 500/5100 - Theorizing Gender (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar introduces students to the core theoretical literature and debates in the field of gender and women studies. In addition to laying the intellectual foundation for further academic work in gender and women’s studies, the seminar also engages contemporary debates on traveling theory with a particular focus on the Global South. All GWST MA students are required to take this course in their first semester.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
  •  

    GWST 501/5101 - Approaches to Middle East/ North Africa Gender and Women’s Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course immerses students in the historical, philosophical and theoretical debates within the academic field of Middle East Gender and Women’s Studies. Interdisciplinary approaches as well as varieties of theoretical positions are exposed and discussed critically. Acknowledging the entanglements of regions, scholarly debates and politically struggles, this course locates the Middle East/ North Africa region within its worldly context. Past foci have included “Women’s Rights, Human Rights ” “Critical Urbanism: Gender, Poverty, Violence,” “Practices of Islamic Family Law” “Regulating Bodies.”
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Repeatable
    May be taken more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    GWST 502/5102 - Justice: Histories and Theories (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to justice as a problem in contemporary cultural, legal and philosophical debates.  The course explores the different domains through which justice becomes a universal language of rights, and the resultant compartmentalization of human experiences along parameters in which culture is presumed to be non-existent, rendering different forms of justice, such as gender justice, appendixes to the already known.  The course will engage with questions of distribution of justice – economic, social, political, historical – in the contemporary world with special focus on locating theories of justice in the practice thereof.  It is conceived as laying the intellectual foundation for the GWST gender and justice graduate concentration, for graduate work in IHRL and other related fields.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered every fall.
  
  •  

    GWST 503/5103 - Histories and Theories of Gender and Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    The aim of this foundation seminar is to introduce students to the historical, theoretical and empirical perspectives and experiences that inform current programs and polices in the filed of gender and development.  The course is divided into four sub-modules each of which will present key concepts in the analysis of social relations between men and women in the context of development thinking.  Each module will present these theoretical perspectives with reference to concrete empirical applications.

    When Offered
    Offered every fall.
  
  •  

    GWST 504/5104 - Gender and Migration (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar provides an in depth engagement with the growing sub-field of Gender and Migration. Themes covered include: international gendered labor markets, migration to and from the Middle East, domestic labor, trafficking, displacement through conflict and development, remittances, and human rights. This is a joint course offered by the Center for Migration Studies and Refugee Studies and the Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    GWST 506/5106 - Reading Capital (3 cr.)



    Description
    The primary goal of this course is to develop adequate tools for understanding the gendering of political economies in the contemporary world. The course provides a reading in the genealogies of capital in order to critically engage emergent political, economic and social forms.

  
  •  

    GWST 507/5107 - Critical Geographies: Reading the Global South (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar explores the spatial and its social, political and gendered effects with a particular focus on dispossession. It introduces students to critical work about space in the social sciences aimed towards social transformation.
     

  
  •  

    GWST 508/5108 - Women and Human Rights (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar explores the historical development of the notion of the human from the 1950’s to the present. It introduces students to women’s struggles for incorporation into human rights discourses, the consolidation of dominant regulatory processes, and their contemporary critical feminist engagements.
     

  
  •  

    GWST 570/5170 - Special Topics in Gender and Women’s Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Alternating selected topics.

    Repeatable
    May be taken more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    GWST 580/5180 - Independent Study and Readings (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Approval of IGWS Graduate Advisory Committee.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    GWST 505/5205 - Gender and Feminist Research Methodologies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to gender and feminist approaches to dominant theories of knowledge and research methodologies in the social sciences.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    GWST 599/5299 - Research Guidance and Thesis (no cr.)



    Description
    Consultation for students in problems related to their thesis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students.

  
  •  

    HIST 110/1101 - World Cultures (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the development and diffusion of culture throughout the world from the great ancient civilizations to the present. The focus will be on making connections across time and space and developing a deeper understanding of the human community in all its aspects: political, social, economic, cultural and environmental.

  
  •  

    HIST 111/1102 - Big History for Freshmen (3 cr.)



    Description
    A study of the earth, the universe and human civilizations that tries to understand how human beings are connected to their environments and the billions of years of historical evolution that preceded their appearance on the planet. Beginning with big bang cosmology and continuing all the way through to the future, it is an attempt to put everything - and everyone - into perspective.

  
  •  

    HIST 122/1103 - Words That Made History: Great Speeches of the 20th Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    Readings and recordings of historic speeches. Studies the lives of the speakers, the contexts in which the speeches were delivered, the rhetoric of the speeches, and the impact the speeches had, both on events and on the English language.

  
  •  

    HIST 123/1201 - Family History in the Modern Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    Focuses on research and fieldwork. Acquaints students with interview techniques and methods in oral and family history. By integrating their own family stories into various conceptual and chronological frameworks, students will discover how history relates to them.

  
  •  

    HIST 209/2019 - Introduction to American Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to key events and texts in the history and culture of the United States. Using films, literature and historical texts, the course will examine American culture within a historical context.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 299/2096 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in International/World Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.

  
  •  

    HIST 299/2097 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Arab World Studies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.
     

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.

  
  •  

    HIST 299/2099 - Selected Topics for the Core Curriculum in Humanities (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    Notes
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.

  
  •  

    HIST 207/2104 - World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    The development of human society from 11,000 BCE to the present. Using archaeology, anthropology, ethno-biology and traditional history, this course examines the civilizations of Polynesia, China, India, Africa, Meso-America, South America, the United States, Europe and the Middle East in order to explain why some societies today are politically, economically and technologically more powerful than others.

  
  •  

    HIST 211/2202 - History In The Making (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course offers introductory history topics, each taught in a separate section. Topics focus on major historical events or movements and will be traced through contemporary literary or visual documentary records and representations of those closely involved. Topics will also examine the way interpretation of such materials may alter over time. Topics will change according to instructor and students should consult current course schedules.

  
  •  

    HIST 246/2203 - Survey of Arab History (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents the history of the Arabic-speaking Middle East from pre-Islamic times to the modern era, with emphasis on the principal political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments and their relevance to the contemporary Middle East. The course introduces students to historical methodology and different interpretive approaches. It attempts to foster a critical attitude toward sources and provides a context in which students can apply skills and concepts acquired in other.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 247/2204 - The Making of the Modern Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    A historical tour of how we got where we are today. The course starts with the late pre-modern Arab world and Ottoman empire, and moves through various forms of threat, influence, change, and modernization to the present. Events in the Arab world are examined in their wider, global context.

  
  •  

    HIST 250/2301 - Colonial and Postcolonial Africa



    Description
    This course will examine the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the eve of the European colonization to the present day. In combining a thematic and chronological approach students will discover the complex history of various people and regions in Africa during this period. Topics range from the imperial scramble to colonize Africa to the integration of African societies into the colonial and global economy; from Western perceptions of Africa and Africans to the social, political and economical impacts of colonial policies; and from Africans’ struggles for freedom during decolonization to Africa’s post independence experience.
     

  
  •  

    HIST 203/2401 - Western Civilization from Antiquity to Medieval Europe (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the history of western society from ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages with emphasis on the ideas and institutions that led to the growth and expansion of European civilization.

  
  •  

    HIST 204/2402 - Europe from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment (1337-1789) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the history of Europe from the start of the Hundred Years War to the French Revolution. It examines the major developments of European politics, society and culture as it moved from the late Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period (including the Renaissance and the Age of Enlightenment) to the beginning of the Age of Revolution.




  
  •  

    HIST 205/2403 - Europe in the Age of Revolution and Reform (1789-1914) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Course explores Europe’s so-called “Long 19th century” from the French Revolution to World War I including many of the phenomena that came to define the century such as capitalism, nationalism, socialism, feminism and imperialism.

     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .

  
  •  

    HIST 206/2404 - Europe in International Politics in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    This Course explores major development in European and international socio-economic politics from the end of the 1800s to the present day. It introduces the key events and trends of this tumultuous century including wars, revolutions, and ideological movements.

     

    Cross-listed
    Same as

     .

  
  •  

    HIST 201/2501 - History of American Civilization to the Nineteenth Century (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of American cultural roots from the period of exploration through the foundation of a federal American republic, social and industrial challenges, the question of slavery, and the crisis of civil war.

  
  •  

    HIST 202/2502 - History of Modern American Civilization (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of events leading to the creation of a distinct American culture as the United States meets the challenges of moral crisis, the industrial revolution, and world leadership from the nineteenth century to the present.

  
  •  

    HIST 210/2602 - Religions of the World (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the academic study of religion. By looking at the history, beliefs, practices, institutions and cultural expressions of a number of different religions, students will broaden their understanding of religions other than their own, and of the diversity of the human religious experience. Students will learn to appreciate the variety of religions in the world, and the similarities and differences between them.

  
  •  

    HIST 212/2604 - The Quest for the Historical Jesus (3 cr.)



    Description
    Investigates the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth within the context of Second Temple Judaism and Greco-Roman culture. Considers a range of pre-modern and modern interpretations of Jesus and the emergence of Christianity.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 225/2701 - East Asian History



    Description
    Introduction to the cultural histories of China, Korea, and Japan from earliest times until the present, including political, social, intellectual and material culture.

  
  •  

    HIST 243/2901 - History I: Pre-Dynastic Through Middle Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Description
    The history of Pharaonic Egypt from predynastic times to the end of the Middle Kingdom will be covered. Literary sources will be augmented by archeological evidence

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
    Notes
    Field trips to archeological sites in the Cairo area are an obligatory aspect of the course.

  
  •  

    HIST 244/2902 - History II: Middle Kingdom Through New Kingdom Egypt (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of the instructor.

    Description
    The course will focus on the history of Pharaonic Egypt from the Middle Kingdom to the decline of the New Kingdom and will examine the texts, monuments and artifacts that underline our understanding of this era.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
    Notes
    Field trips to the Cairo Museum and other relevant sites are a required part of the course.

  
  •  

    HIST 320/3105 - Big History (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    The course will not be open to students who have already taken   .

    Description
    A study of the earth, the universe and human civilizations that tries to understand how human beings are connected to their environments and the billions of years of historical evolution that preceded their appearance on the planet. Beginning with big bang cosmology and continuing all the way through to the future, it is an attempt to put everything - and everyone - into perspective.

  
  •  

    HIST 319/3205 - Islamic Spain and North Africa (711-1492 A.D.) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is an introduction to the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Muslim Spain and North Africa. Its emphasis is on explaining how interactions among different ethnic groups (Arabs, Berbers, and Iberian natives) and different confessional communities (Jews, Christians, and Muslims) created social situations that made the Western Muslim lands unique in Islamic history.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 330/3206 - Urban Landscapes in the Modern Middle East/North Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course presents diverse histories of cities in the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the impact of French and British colonialism to Arab nationalism. It introduces students to central themes in modern urban history with emphasis on the city and the production of modern lives, rural migration and the transformation of the city, women and men in the city, and urban crisis and social movements.

  
  •  

    HIST 331/3207 - History of Palestine/Israel (3 cr.)



    Description
    This survey course covers the history of modern Palestine and Israel. It is based on a comparative approach that allows students to engage with primary materials, secondary historical texts, literary narratives, and cinematic representations. This course provides students with the historical and theoretical tools to learn about and engage formations of nation and history in Palestine/Israel.

  
  •  

    HIST 333/3208 - Zionism and Modern Judaism (3 cr.)



    Description
    The Zionist ideology and movement in its own terms, and in the context of modern Judaism. The course places Zionism in its historical and religious contexts, and examines its varieties. The Zionist movement is followed from its origins to the establishment of Israel. Related aspects of Israeli politics are then examined, with especial reference to ideological and religious debates.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 343/3210 - Birth of Muslim Community and Rise of the Arab Caliphates (3 cr.)



    Description
    The rise of Islam and Arab expansion, the classical period of Islamic civilization during its first centuries to the period of Abbasid political disintegration.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    HIST 344/3211 - Caliphs and Sultans in the Age of Crusades and Mongols (3 cr.)



    Description
    The later Abbasid caliphate, the rise of Shi’ism and the Fatimids, Sunni consolidation under the Seljuks and Ayyubids, external threats to dar al-Islam; the rise of Mamluks .

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    HIST 345/3212 - Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids and Mughols (3 cr.)



    Description
    The decline of the Mamluks; the Timurids in Persia; the age of gunpowder: the Safavid Ottoman, and Moghul empires and their decline.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    HIST 355/3213 - State and Society in the Middle East, 1699-1914 (3 cr.)



    Description
    The Ottoman Empire and Iran: continuities and transformations. Imperial administration and relations with Europe. Challenges to the premodern order: regional and global economies; social and cultural trends

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 356/3214 - State and Society in the Middle East, 1906-present (3 cr.)



    Description
    Beginning with the Young Turk and Iran’s Constitutional revolutions, this course follows the fate of Middle Eastern societies and states during the twentieth century, with a special focus on colonialism and nationalism; independence movements and decolonization; the Arab-Israeli conflict; society, politics, and culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    HIST 357/3288 - Selected topics in Middle East History (3 cr.)



    Description
    Focuses on theme or topic in the history of the Middle East. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    HIST 350/3302 - Violence, War, and Conflict in Modern Africa (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore the complexities of violent conflicts on the African continent in the past 125 years. As violence, conflicts and wars seem to be crucial elements of Africa’s modern history; students will for example investigate if this means that Africans are inherently more violent than the rest of the world – or if such an assumption only disguises the complex historical roots of war and conflicts? Moreover, students will also discover that Africans have historically resisted violence and oppression just as often as they have promoted it. Students can expect to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary material and will be introduced to different African regions to get a deeper understanding of contexts of violence in Africa’s past and present. By the end of the course students will be able to critically analyze common narratives about “the violent continent” reproduced by mass media.
     

  
  •  

    HIST 307/3405 - The Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation (3 cr.)



    Description
    An investigation of the development of European culture in the High Middle Ages and an examination of the ways in which European society was transformed by the intellectual and religious movements known as the Renaissance and the Reformation.

  
  •  

    HIST 308/3406 - Europe in the Age of Reason (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the ways in which European intellectual developments during the Enlightenment were connected with socio-political changes in the seventeenth, eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

  
  •  

    HIST 360/3408 - Rise and Fall of Nazi Germany (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    This course explores the rise and fall of perhaps the most destructive regime in the history of Modern Europe. It traces the Nazi Party from its rise to power to downfall, exploring the politics and ideologies that come to define life in both Nazi Germany and Nazi occupied Europe. We will pay particular attention to the development of Nazi racial policies and the events that led to the Holocaust. Through the readings, writings, assignments and in class-projects, the student will learn to think critically about not only how and why the Nazis were able to come to power but also how the Nazis were able to put into motion their program of racial genocide across Europe.
     

  
  •  

    HIST 309/3504 - History of American Political Thought (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   or  

    Description
    An examination of the major themes in American political thought and ideology from 1607 to the present with an emphasis on the ways in which conceptions of personal freedom, congregationalism, individualism, social Darwinism, civil liberties, civil rights, progressivism, liberalism, conservatism, populism, or anti-communism either reflected or influenced political action.

  
  •  

    HIST 342/3903 - History of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Era (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    This course will study the history of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period and the momentous confrontation between Greek and Egyptian culture between 300 BC and 700 AD. It will also examine the social consequences of the spread of Christianity in Egypt and the rise of Coptic culture.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    HIST 346/3904 - Societies and Cultures of the Ancient Near East (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , or instructor’s consent

    Description
    The course constitutes a historical overview of the societies and cultures of Egypt, the Mediterranean World and the Middle East, from the emergence of urban society in Iraq in the fourth millennium BCE to the rise and fall of the great empires of Babylon, Assyria, the Hitties, Archaemenid Persia, Greece and Rome. Special attention will be paid to the position of Ancient Egyptian civilization within the wider context of Ancient Near Eastern History.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    HIST 425/4106 - Food in World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    An inter-disciplinary examination of the role of food in human history beginning with the agricultural revolution and including such topics as the Columbian exchange, industrialization, the rise of the restaurant, food as cultural identity, food policy and the state, fast food, gender roles, health and nutrition, and the emergence of modern attitudes towards food and the body.


     

  
  •  

    HIST 430/4107 - The Environment in World History (3 cr.)



    Description
    An examination of the relationship between humans and the environment from the Agricultural Revolution (c. 10,000 BCE) to the present with an emphasis on the Industrial Revolution and the modern world.

  
  •  

    HIST 405/4188 - Selected Topics in World History (3 cr.)



    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.

  
  •  

    HIST 415/4215 - The Marriage Crisis and the Middle East (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines how men and women imagine their nations through marriage and understand their rights and duties in the twentieth-century Middle East. It shows how marriage is a lens that reflects and critiques larger socioeconomic and political issues. It also contributes to our historical understanding of the “marriage crisis”, which continues to dominate public debates today.

  
  •  

    HIST 435/4216 - Social and Political History of Modern Cairo (3 cr.)



    Description
    The History of Cairo with an emphasis on social, political and economic developments in the twentieth century.

  
  •  

    HIST 440/4217 - Colonialism and Imperialism in the Middle East and South Asia (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course deals with the history of colonialism and imperialism in the Middle East and South Asia. Its basic premise is that the colonial encounter was a formative one for both colonizer and colonized. We will be studying not only the political and military aspects of that encounter, but also its ideological and cultural ones. Topics touched upon include: Orientalism, imperialism and culture, medicine, law, urban planning, and gender.

  
  •  

    HIST 454/4219 - Modern Movements in Islam (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or    or equivalent background.

    Description
    Trends of thought and activism that developed throughout the Muslim world from the eighteenth century onward and identified themselves as Islamic. This course looks at intellectual roots, affiliations, and differences. It investigates modernity, reform, statehood, and social change as addressed by state and non-state actors, in theory and in practice.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    HIST 460/4220 - Selected Topics in Middle Eastern History, 600-1250 A. D. (3 cr.)



    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 463/4221 - Selected Topics in the History of Islamic Thought and Institutions (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 462/4288 - Selected Topics in the History of the Modern Middle East (3 cr.)



    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
  
  •  

    HIST 461/4289 - Selected Topics in Middle Eastern History, 1250-1800 A. D. (3 cr.)



    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit when content changes.
 

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