Dec 11, 2019  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    EMBA 613/5613 - Leadership & Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    The leadership module moves participants to a deeper understanding of their leadership competencies and personality style through further analysis of assessments with Center for Creative Learning (CCL) coach. Participants will be able to integrate managerial skills and effective concepts of leadership (Traits, Competencies and Ethics) of the work place. They will learn how to understand to better coach others when in leadership role and how to flex their styles as needed to lead others more effectively. They will be able to refine and update their personal development goals, as needed in response to circumstances on the job and further feedback in providing leadership solutions.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 614/5614 - Innovation and Creating the Best Practices of Tomorrow (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It explores a broader, more inclusive view of innovation, enabling the manager to employ innovation as a more effective competitive weapon, leading to an understanding of state-of-the-art “Innovation Process Management” within and between firms and across geographies. It addresses how to make creative energy the goal of the organization and energizes the staff to be creative and see problems not as obstacles but as opportunities for innovation.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 615/5615 - Global Supply Chain Management and Operational Excellence (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module is about supply chain management from suppliers to customers to clients, how to link it with marketing and business strategy and develop Global Business Networks. It addresses operational excellence as a competitive strategy, customer service versus operational efficiency from “built-to-forecast” to “build-to-order” and behavioral operational management
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 616/5616 - Negotiation & Conflict Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It focuses on negotiation as an important process in resolving conflicts that may arise from differences in interests such as goal, priorities or competition from limited resources. It examines stakes, power, interdependence, trust, coalitions, communication, and personal negotiation styles. Participants practice cross-cultural negotiations, dispute resolution, coalition formulation. It addresses multiparty negotiations, extremely competitive negotiations and negotiations via Information Technology (IT).
     

  
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    EMBA 617/5617 - Entrepreneurial Management (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    It covers the challenges involved in managing entrepreneurial ventures, whether they are start-ups, small entrepreneurial firm or units within larger, well-established companies. It focuses on the behaviors and attributes required to operate successfully within entrepreneurial environment. The module addresses the concepts, theory of practice of entrepreneurship in a dynamic international environment. It helps participants to understand the risks and rewards that accompany entrepreneurial activities and develop the skills of leadership while enhancing their own practice.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 618/5618 - Doing Business With The East (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module is live-in week in Hong Kong. Participants will be prepared for new challenges and opportunities that they will face in the business world, especially in China and Asia. The modules include introduction to Asia/China Business, Economic, social and political environments. Emphasis will be on China’s current Economy Development, Change in Business environment and managing in a Chinese context.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 619/5619 - Doing Business With The East (International Live-in Module) (2.75 cr.)



    Description
    The module will be a continuation of above topic. There will be an overview about the Legal and Regulatory issues, managing Joint-Venture Partnerships, Entry strategies, Marketing and Human Resources challenges in China. Practical cases on Legal and Regulatory issues and on Successful Negotiation in China will be studies. Participants will be able to visit companies during their study.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 620/5620 - Corporate Governance & Social Responsibility (2 cr.)



    Description
    This module focuses on how corporate governance, as a set of processes, customs, policies, laws and institutions, affects the way the organization is directed and controlled. It examines how the quality of corporate governance system influences prices shares of the company and the cost of raising capital and how it complies with the legal and regulatory requirements. It addresses some important topics as the separation of ownership and control, property rights, reconciling conflicts between stakeholders and the role of the board of directors in ensuring accountability, fairness and transparency in the firm’s relationship with all its stakeholders.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 621/5621 - Business & Legal Environment (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module relates business to its legal environment. It provides broad analysis of how laws influence management decisions and strategies, how to review the characteristics of various legal structures and how to set the legal framework for doing business. It focuses on how business decisions and transactions should comply with the law. It familiarizes participants with certain basic legal concepts relating to doing business on national and international levels.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 622/5622 - Development & Rationale for Competitive Law (1.75 cr.)



    Description
    This module looks at how competition law fits in a larger context of economic policy. It covers the development and rationale for international competition law for firms, with reference to developing countries’ competition law as well as relevant provisions in the Egyptian competition policy and covers agreements between firms (cartels, joint ventures, mergers), monopolization, and public enforcement of law by competition authorities, private enforcement in the courts and the coordination of private and public enforcement.
     

  
  •  

    EMBA 623/5623 - Adapting to Global Environment - Integration Consultation Project (4 cr.)



    Description
    Participants undertake a successful “consulting” project within their own organization, identifying a challenge or an opportunity they seek to address and undertaking the appropriate analysis leading to a recommended course of action. Participants are encouraged to apply and integrate several analytical tools and organizational skills learned in various courses of the program. It provides concrete tools and concepts for projects management. The module is taught in an interactive case-based format. Participants are expected to actively participate while providing insights from their own experiences with project management. Participants will understand why many projects fail, know the critical success factors, be able to define and analyze work breakdown structures and critical paths for projects, and understand the impact of uncertainty on project management.
     

  
  •  

    ENGL 100/0210 - Academic English for Freshmen (0 cr.)



    Description
    ENGL 0210 is a non-credit, concurrent, conference-centered course in which classes meet four days a week for a total of 12 (in-class) instructional hours, in addition to weekly conferences with the teacher. A student who for any reason misses more than 10 days (or the equivalent of 36 contact hours) will be dropped from the course. A student who is dropped will be allowed to retake the course the following semester. Sessions are devoted to the comprehension and summary of university-level texts, the introduction to basic research tools, the writing of essays on science and humanities topics and remedial grammar, within the context of individual teacher-student conferences. Freshmen taking ENGL 0210 may enroll in no more than two academic courses with a maximum of 7 academic course credits. Any student who withdraws from ENGL 0210 must also withdraw from the two other academic courses.


    For new students, placement in Academic English for Freshmen is determined by their score on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-Based Test (TOEFL-iBT) For students enrolled in the intensive English program, placement in Academic English for Freshmen is determined by their scores on the IEP exit test. All students who have been admitted into ENGL 0210 must satisfactorily complete the course work within a time period not to exceed two full semesters and a summer session. Students taking ENGL 0210 in summer may not enroll in any other academic course.
     

  
  •  

    ENGL 123/0310 - Effective Writing (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  •  

    ENGL 124/0311 - Academic Reading (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  •  

    ENGL 125/0312 - Listening and Speaking (for Graduates) (0 cr.)



  
  •  

    ENGL 199/0399 - Selected Topic for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all first-year students as part of the Primary Level Core.

    Notes
    May be taken concurrently with   .

  
  •  

    ENGR 101/1001 - Introduction to Engineering (1 cr.)



    Description
    History of engineering. Engineering fields of specialization and curricula. The engineering profession: team work, professionalism, ethics, licensing, communication and societal obligations. Engineering support personnel and activities. Engineering approach to problem solving. Examples of major engineering projects. Course project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    The course must be taken in the year of admission to the engineering program.

  
  •  

    ENGR 115/1005 - Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Drawing (2 cr.)



    Description
    Introductory descriptive geometry. Orthographic and pictorial drawing. Sectional views, auxiliary views, and conventions. Dimensioning. Free hand sketching, and both manual and computer-aided drafting.

    Hours
    One class period and one three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 212/2102 - Engineering Mechanics I (Statics) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Fundamentals of mechanics. Equilibrium of practices, forces in space, equivalent systems, equilibrium of rigid bodies, distributed forces, center of gravity, internal actions, analysis of simple structures and machine parts. Friction. Moment of inertia.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 214/2104 - Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Kinematics and kinetics of a particle, system of particles, and rigid bodies. Energy and momentum methods. Engineering applications.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 229/2112 - Strength and Testing of Materials (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Concept of stress and strain in components, mechanical behavior of materials under tensile, compressive, and shear loads, hardness, impact loading, fracture and fatigue. Analysis of stresses and the corresponding deformations in components, axial loading, torsion, bending, and transverse loading. Statically indeterminate problems. Transformation of plane stresses, and Mohr’s circle..

    Hours
    Three class periods and one three-hour lab period
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 261/2122 - Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid flow. Conservation of momentum, energy, continuity and Bernoulli’s equations. Viscous efforts for laminar and turbulent flow. Steady state closed conduit and open channel flow.

    Hours
    Two class periods and one three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 313/3202 - Engineering Analysis and Computation I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Solution of sets of linear equations, roots of equations, curve fitting (interpolation), numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, boundary value problems and introduction to the finite difference method of computer programs for problem solving. It includes a programming based project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 318/3212 - General Electrical Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Active, reactive and apparent power, three-phase systems, electrical measurements, transformers, motors: types, performance and selection generation, transmission and distribution of Electrical Energy, protective and earthing systems, energy management and cost.



     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 345/3222 - Engineering Economy (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Economic and cost concepts, the time value of money, single, multiple and series of cash flows, gradients, functional notation, nominal and effective interest rates, continuous compounding, rates of return. Computation and applications, economic feasibility of projects and worth of investments, comparison of alternatives. Replacement, deprecation and B.E. analysis. Introduction to risk analysis.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    ENGR 364/3322 - Fundamentals of Thermofluids (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      . Open for Electronics Engineering major only.

    Description
    Introduction to thermodynamics concepts and definitions; pure substance and ideal gases; the first law of thermodynamics, the concepts of the second law of thermodynamics, continuity; momentum and energy equations; introduction to laminar and turbulent flows; flow in conduits; introduction to turbomachinery; conduction heat transfer: one-dimensional and fins; forced and natural convention heat transfer.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ENGR 494/4990 - Entrepreneurial Development and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    This capstone course provides a general introduction to Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation. It develops a perception of being an “entrepreneur” in the mind of the student. Students analyze the concepts, elements, processes and behaviors associated with successful entrepreneurship, and develop an insight into how to evaluate and launch ventures and enterprises in all sectors, including business, culture, and society. The course is structured around lectures, interactive sessions, visiting speakers, case study analysis, and community-based learning. The skills of critical and creative thinking, communication, presentation, analysis, synthesis and persuasion are emphasized.

  
  •  

    ENGR 511/5202 - Computational Methods in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Numerical solution of sets of algebraic and transcendental equations, eigen system analysis, numerical integration and differentiation. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, numerical solution of partial differential equations, optimization methods. Applications using MATLAB.

  
  •  

    ENGR 518/5204 - Engineering Statistics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, test of hypotheses, regression, correlation, and nonparametric statistics.

  
  •  

    ENGR 512/5210 - Experimental Methods in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Types of experiments. Physical models: type, scale, material selection. Experimental setups. Measurements: electrical measurements and sensing devices; pressure and flow measurements; temperature and thermal measurements; force, strain and motion measurements; computer data storage. Design of experiments: review of statistical inference, single factor experiments, randomized block and Latin square designs, factorial designs. Regression.

  
  •  

    ENGR 516/5240 - Engineering for a Sustainable Environment (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid, industrial and hazardous waste generation and control, with an emphasis on sustainable engineering practices such as environmental impact assessment and performance, waste management, pollution prevention, waste minimization, cleaner production, energy recovery, recycling and reuse.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    ENGR 590/5940 - Graduate Thesis Seminar I (2 cr.)



    Description
    Seminars on research topics, research methodology and thesis writing, and presentations given by invited speakers.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    ENGR 591/5941 - Graduate Thesis Seminar II (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Seminars on research topics given by invited speakers and on research plans given by students to discuss their thesis topics and the results they obtained in their work.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    ENTR 203/2101 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the concept of entrepreneurship as well as the specificities of managing a small business compared to a large one. The student will develop a general understanding of entrepreneurship as an economic activity and the role it plays as a catalyst of economic growth and social development. The personal traits and behaviors, and the organizational characteristics associated with successful entrepreneurship will be analyzed and discussed. The student will also be introduced to different organizational aspects and managerial activities related to launching and managing a small business.
     

  
  •  

    ENTR 303/3201 - Principles of Entrepreneurial Finance (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course teaches about financing of new entrepreneurial ventures. The course will examine both the entrepreneur’s and investor’s perspective with special emphasis on the venture capital process.
     

  
  •  

    ENTR 413/4102 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is an interdisciplinary course combining skills from all areas of business. It focuses on the creation of new business ventures with an emphasis on personal rather than corporate goals. Special focus is placed on problems encountered by the entrepreneurs in the Middle East and development of solutions to those problems. The course also prepares students for intrapreneur or entrepreneur business careers in startups and small and large corporations. It offers and understanding of the stages of business formation and what activities are appropriate at each stage of business development to meet financial goals including preparations of feasibility studies for business start-ups.

  
  •  

    ENTR 417/4301 - Entrepreneurship Lab: Developing and Launching a New Venture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     ,    and   .

    Description
    This course is specially intended for non-business students, minors in entrepreneurship, and students writing business plans for new ventures. It concentrates on the mechanics of constructing a creative, realistic and effective business plans for a new concept that the student team has generated and developed. Thus, it is intended as a “hands-on” experience that explores the process that a person must go through to put together a proper business plan for a start-up venture.
     

  
  •  

    ENVE 561/5250 - Water Quality Control (3 cr.)



    Description
    Water quality parameters: standards and analysis; theory and basic processes for modeling fate and transport of pollutants in surface water bodies; integrated water pollution control strategies.

  
  •  

    ENVE 562/5251 - Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Theory and design of unit operations and processes in environmental engineering, emphasizing water and wastewater treatment; namely: physical, chemical and biological unit processes, sludge handling processes.   

    Cross-listed
    Same as   but with additional requirements for graduate students.
  
  •  

    ENVE 564/5252 - Air Pollution Control Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Air pollutants sources, sinks, and residence time. Costs of air pollution. Control strategies and systems design. Mathematical models of air pollution. Monitoring and control instruments.

  
  •  

    ENVE 565/5253 - Air Pollution and Combustion (3 cr.)



    Description
    Air pollution and combustion, combustion generated pollutants, greenhouse effect, fuel alternatives, effects of air pollution on health and vegetation, other forms of energy sources, technologies for emission reduction and control.

  
  •  

    ENVE 566/5254 - Solid and Hazardous Wastes Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Solid wastes – Nature, generation and collection.  Local and regional management strategies including recycling and recovery of useful products, landfilling, and incineration.  Hazardous wastes – Nature, generation and collection.  Risk assessment.  Management strategies including source reduction, treatment, recovery, landfilling, and incineration. 

    Cross-listed
    Same as   but with additional requirements for graduate students.

    Same as

      .

  
  •  

    ENVE 567/5255 - Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    Chemical principles for quantitative solution of environmental engineering problems with a focus on aqueous systems. Concept of chemical equilibrium is developed to determine mass distribution of environmentally significant substances. Applications of acid-base, coordination, oxidation-reduction, and organic distribution reactions are developed for water and wastewater systems.

  
  •  

    ENVE 568/5256 - Noise Pollution Fundamentals, Measurements and Control (3 cr.)



    Description
    Properties of sound waves in free fields and enclosures; effects of noise on people; quantitative measurement of noise characteristics and impact; noise reduction indoors and outdoors; noise control regulations.

  
  •  

    ENVE 569/5258 - Groundwater Hydrology and Contamination (3 cr.)



    Description
    Groundwater and well hydraulics with applications to water supply and control of contaminants; groundwater contamination; development, solution and application of contaminant transport equations; groundwater remediation; introduction to unsaturated flow.

  
  •  

    ENVE 580/5910 - Independent Study in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

    Notes
    (Students may sign for up to 3 credits towards fulfilling M. Sc. requirements).

  
  •  

    ENVE 592/5930 - Advanced Topics in Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    Topics to be chosen every year according to specific interests.

    Repeatable
    May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    ENVE 599/5980 - Research Guidance Thesis (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis.

    Repeatable
    Must be taken twice for credit.
  
  •  

    ENVE 662/6250 - Advanced Treatment Processes (3 cr.)



    Description
    Description, design, and applications of advanced technologies for removal of contaminants from environmental media; membrane technologies – nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, membrane bioreactors; adsorption; biological activated carbon; biofilters; pulsators; tube settlers; advanced oxidation processes – ozonation, UV radiation, photo-oxidation, chemical oxidation and reduction; cryogenic and thermal processes.
     

  
  •  

    ENVE 680/6910 - Independent Study in Environmental Engineering (3 cr. Max.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of environmental engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.
     

  
  •  

    ENVE 692/6930 - Advanced Selected Topics in Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.
     

  
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    ENVE 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.
     

  
  •  

    EUST 504/5501 - European Union Law (3 cr.)



    Description
    Introduction to the major institutions and decision making procedures of the European Union’s constitutional structure as well as the foundational doctrines and processes developed by the EU judicial system.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    EUST 506/5502 - Seminar on Practical Diplomacy (Arranged with European embassies and institutions) (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar is conducted with occasional seminar visits to local European embassies and institutions. In-class work includes study of local and international diplomatic processes, student presentations, and a final paper. All students prepare for visits and write reports. Students must be prepared to leave AUC early on days when visits are scheduled.

  
  •  

    EUST 508/5503 - Seminar on the European Union (3 cr.)



    Description
    This seminar course includes occasional speakers from local European embassies and institutes. Topics may include constitutional, political, economic, social, cultural, and defense issues. Class-work includes preparation for student presentations on these and other current EU issues.

  
  •  

    EUST 511/5504 - Special Topics in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century European Studies (3 cr.)



    Description
    Content differs according to topics.

    Cross-listed
    Same as 
  
  •  

    EUST 513/5505 - The European Systems of Human Rights Protection (3 cr.)



    Description
    Examination of the procedures and substantive law contained in conventions, treaties, reports, judgments, and other documents will be examined for a comprehensive understanding of the development of human rights law in Europe. These human rights systems are considered in relation to their origins in social and political movements and their subsequent effects on politics and society.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
  
  •  

    FILM 199/1099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concern and accessible to all first-year students as part of the Primary Level Core.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FILM 299/2099 - Selected Topics for Core Curriculum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Course addressing broad intellectual concerns and accessible to all students, irrespective of major.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FILM 213/2113 - Introduction to Visual Cultures (3 cr.)



    Description
    Introduces students to the study of visual cultures in such arenas as film and video, photography, painting and sculpture, the built environment, advertising and fashion, and social media/internet. Students will learn how to analyze visual materials across media, interpret meanings, and gain experience in applying critical concepts to these understandings.
     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   ,  .
  
  •  

    FILM 220/2120 - Introduction to Film (3 cr.)



    Description
    An introduction to the art of cinema, covering basic film history, theory, aesthetics, and production. Dramatic narrative (fiction), documentary (non-fiction), and avant-garde subjects are analyzed in detail, and relevant films are screened in class to stimulate discussion.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Required for the minor in film.

  
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    FILM 200/2200 - Analogue and Digital Practices (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces students to the basic skills in various traditional and contemporary mediums: screen printing, digital photography, digital imaging, video and sound editing. The aim is to offer hands-on basic skills in analogue and digital practices including film, visual arts and graphic design.

     

    Cross-listed
    Same as   ,  .
    Notes
    *Registration in this course is contingent upon consent of the director of the program

  
  •  

    FILM 341/3041 - Anthropology and Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The history and practice of film in anthropology; film as ethnography; comparison of films and analytical ethnographies.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FILM 370/3070 - Selected Topics in Film (3 cr.)



    Description
    In-depth examination of specific topics in film determined by the special interests and expertise of the faculty..

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes
  
  •  

    FILM 310/3110 - History of World Cinema (3 cr.)



    Description
    A survey of international narrative cinema, from the silent period to the present. Individual films, film movements and film genres will be studied, and important films from the respective periods will be screened in whole or in part.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall or spring.
  
  •  

    FILM 320/3120 - Cinema in Egypt and the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines various aspects of cinema in Egypt and the Arab World in order to understand its history, and determine the themes, the styles, and the character of this cinema which has been historically among the most influential in national world cinemas. Topics could include areas such as New Arab Cinemas, classical Egyptian cinema, the Arab film industry, independent Arab cinema, among others.

  
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    FILM 330/3130 - Film Theory and Criticism (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of the Director of the Film Program.

    Description
    A historical study of the major theoretical approaches to motion picture art, Including early analysis of film aesthetics, structure, and form, as well as modernist political critiques of cinema. Films will be screened class to facilitate understanding of the readings.

    When Offered
    Offered in the fall or spring.
  
  •  

    FILM 340/3140 - Documentary Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or consent of the Director of the Film Program.

    Description
    A Study of the non-fiction film, Its international history, theoretical approaches to its structure and effects, and current issues in documentary production. Class screenings will be used to expose students to important and relevant examples of documentary cinema.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    FILM 360/3160 - The Filmmaker (3 cr.)



    Description
    A detailed study of the themes, the characteristic style, development, and influence of the director within the world of cinema. The course will assess, compare, and/or contrast combinations of two to three filmmakers. Themes could inclulde empahsis on filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorcese, the Coen Brothers, Youssef Chahine, George Romero, George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Ingmar Bergman, Salah Abou-Seif, Pier Paolo Pasolini, among others.

  
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    FILM 390/3190 - Film Genres (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines questions relating to one or several generic forms and conventions, drawing examples from Hollywood as well as a variety of world cinemas. Topics could include the Musical, Comedy, Horror, Film Noir, Western, Historical Epic genres, etc.

  
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    FILM 351/3251 - Digital Editing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on developing practical as well as aesthetic skills for digital forms of film editing. Students will engage in several assignments and exercises manifesting their capacity to work on various applications of editing techniques.

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    FILM 353/3253 - Digital Cinematography (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on developing the practical as well as aesthetic skills necessary for digital cinematography. As part of a fast emerging and increasingly dominant form of filmmaking, digital cinematography has become key in contemporary mainstream, alternative and independent filmmaking. Students will perform assignments and exercises manifesting their capacity to work with various applications of cinematographic techniques and their integration with lighting design and camera movement.
     

  
  •  

    FILM 357/3257 - Screenwriting (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       

    Description
    Provides an overview of the role of storytelling in filmmaking practice, introducing students to the techniques used by screenwriters to craft stories in both fiction and non-fiction and television programs and other moving picture media.
     

  
  •  

    FILM 352/3352 - The Film Industry (3 cr.)



    Description
    The organization of the production, distribution and exhibition practices of various film industries. May include an examination of the relationship between a national film industry and other visual media; changing technologies and their impact on the medium; connections and intersections between the film industry and other economic industries and dynamics.
     

  
  •  

    FILM 354/3354 - Film Audience and Reception (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or consent of Visual Cultures Director.

    Description
    The course maps aspects of spectatorship, audience, and reception approaches as they intersect with experiences and study of cinema. The course provides students with tools to appreciate film as an interactive medium of communication. It explored these approaches with emphasis on spectatorial agency. Resistant and subversive reading, and hegemonic and counter-hegemonic readership and production.
     

  
  •  

    FILM 450/4250 - Senior Film Project (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    At least three courses from the’Film Production’ list.

    Description
    Senior students work on making their own film projects with the participation of other film students. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will develop their project through pre-production, production, post-production phases. Attention will be given to quality excellence rather than quantity and length films.
     

  
  •  

    FILM 452/4352 - The Arab and Egyptian Film Industries: National and Global Perspectives (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Fourth year level in the Film major or the consent of the Program Director.

    Description
    A study of the nature of the Arab and Egyptian Film industry. Emphasis will be on the evolution of the Arab motion picture industry in the twentieth century and how it is situated in contemporary popular culture. Other topics include Egyptian cinema’s relationship to Hollywood, the audience for Egyptian and Arab films, the role of the state cinematic funding, distribution and production systems, the impact of new technologies, and how the structure of the Egyptian and Arab film industries compares with those of other countries.
     

    Notes
    This course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    FILM 456/4356 - Experiential Learning in Film (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Fourth year level in the Film major or the consent of the Program Director.

    Description
    This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to combine interests in film studies research with experimental learning opportunities in the community and workplace ( internships, paid employment or volunteer position).
     

  
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    FILM 470/4370 - Advanced Seminar in Film Study and Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Fourth year level in the Film Major or consent of the Film Program Director.

    Description
    This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to combine interests in film studies research with experimental learning opportunities in the community and workplace ( internships, paid employment or volunteer position).
     

  
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    FILM 402/4402 - Independent Study (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: departmental approval required.

    Description
    With departmental approval, advanced students may arrange an individualized course topic to be completed under faculty supervision.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    An overall minimum B average is required for admission to the course

  
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    FINC 303/2101 - Business Finance I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      , (   or   ) and  

    Description
    The study of the principles of finance and their application to business enterprises. Special emphasis on financial analysis, management of working capital, cost of capital, capital budgeting, long term financing, dividend policy and internal finance.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 404/3201 - Investment Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to the theory of investments. Topics include risk and return, the theory of portfolio selection, asset pricing models, valuation for stocks, bond pricing and the term structure of interest rates and options.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 405/3401 - Applied Banking (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Measuring returns and risks in banking, evaluation of a bank’s performance, introduction to lending techniques and risk rating methods. Analyzing creditworthiness of business firms and financial institutions. Credit-management techniques such as asset protection, asset conversion and cash-flow analysis are introduced.

    When Offered
    Offered twice a year.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 408/3501 - International Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The effect of the international financial environment on the major financial decisions of business. The international financial institution and their effect on firms operating in the international environment.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 410/4202 - Capital Markets (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the structure and mechanics of financial markets coupled with a practical perspective of the use of finacial tools and their applications. It will introduce students to capital markets with global applications to various financial instruments including debt, equity and derivative securities, such as forwards, futures, and options. The course, as well, aims to widen students understanding of the various risks encountered by financial institutions and the means by which they are mitigated and managed.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in courses is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in courses specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 412/4203 - Options and Derivatives (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Overview of basic derivative securities; forwards, futures and options. The focus is on the valuation of these securities and the use of derivatives for hedging risks. More complex derivatives may be covered.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 415/4204 - Portfolio Theory and its Applications (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Portfolio Theory provides students with basic concepts and models of financial theory and introduces them to the evaluation of quantity risk and return decisions. Subjects that are offered in this course: Capital assets Pricing Theory; Arbitrage Pricing Theory; Derivatives and Portfolio Selection and Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 414/4301 - Corporate Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course introduces students to basic concepts of corporate finance in the Egyptian environment. The course will cover the theory and application of capital budgeting techniques and capital structure choice of firms.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 470/4970 - Special Topics in Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

    Description
    Considers selected topics of current relevance in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 475/4975 - Independent Study in Financial Management (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of FINC unit head and chair.

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussions on specific selected topic in Financial Management.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
    Notes
    Enrollment in is limited, and priority is given to students seeking the Bachelor of Business Administration degree or the Bachelor of Accounting degree, students enrolling in specified as collateral requirements in other majors, and students who have declared business administration as a minor.

  
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    FINC 527/5201 - Managerial Economics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course aims at applying economic principles to managerial decision making. The course covers topics such as demand, costs and market structure and their relation to pricing, product choice and resource allocation. This course also covers Macroeconomic topics such as saving, investment and the rate of interest; the theory of inflation; and economic growth.

  
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    FINC 540/5202 - Financial Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    It is a basic business finance course, dealing with various aspects of financial decision making. It provides an introduction to time value of money; bond and stock valuation; ratio analysis; financing decisions; capital budgeting; cost of capital; capital structure; risk and return; dividend policy; operating and financial leverage; and working capital management.

    Cross-listed
    Same as   .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    FINC 541/5203 - Investments (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    This course will examine four different types of asset markets: equity markets, fixed income markets, futures markets and options markets. It will focus on the valuation of assets in these markets, the empirical evidence on asset valuation models, and strategies that can be employed to achieve various investment goals.


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.

  
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    FINC 535/5204 - Applied Financial Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course introduces the main econometric methods and techniques used in the analysis of issues related to finance. The course will cover econometric models and their application to various financial problems such as: the testing of market efficiency, empirical testing of the various asset pricing models (CAPM, Fama French, APT), measuring and forecasting volatility of bond and stock returns (ARCH and GARCH models) and tests for market contagion amongst others.
     

  
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    FINC 542/5311 - International Financial Markets (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    This is a course on international financial markets and exchange rates. Topics include pricing in the foreign currency and use of forward exchange for hedging short-term returns and market efficiency in the international money markets, foreign currency options, international capital asset pricing, pricing of foreign currency bonds, currency swaps, syndicated loans, foreign currency financing and exposure management


     

     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.

  
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    FINC 543/5312 - Financial Institutions and Markets (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   , ,      ,   and  .

    Description
    This course will analyze the role of financial markets and financial institutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be on debt contracts and securities and on innovations in the bond and money markets. The functions of commercial banks, investment banks, and other financial intermediaries will be covered. Aspects of the regulation of these institutions will also be examined.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
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    FINC 512/5313 - Options and Derivatives (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers a list of advanced topics in derivative securities. It assumes that students have taken an introductory course in derivatives as well as an introduction to fixed-income markets. The first part of the course develops numerical techniques which are used to implement pricing methodologies. The techniques are applied to exotic options and real options. The second part of the course develops term structure models and options based on fixed income securities.


     

  
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    FINC 516/5314 - Real Estate Finance (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces main elements of real estate Finance. It begins with a comprehensive introduction of mortgage from the perspective of capital market investors. The mortgage basics are then used in investment analysis of income producing properties. The public debt and equity are introduced in the third part of this course.
     

  
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    FINC 518/5315 - Islamic Finance (3 cr.)



    Description
    Islamic Finance is one of the fastest growing and most innovative financial disciplines in the international financial markets. It is growing at a rate of 15-20 % each year. It is one of the least understood both by the western financial community and indeed by those in Islamic communities. This course offers a clear and understandable examination of this dynamic area of finance. It will help participants to fully understand the fundamental principles underlying modern Islamic finance, as well as modern practices prevailing in this industry.
     

  
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    FINC 513/5331 - Fixed Income Securities (3 cr.)



    Description
    This is a course on fixed-income securities and related derivatives. It covers basic analytical tools in fixed-income markets. Topics include relative pricing of fixed-income securities, forward rates, yield-to-maturity, yield-curve trading strategies and immunization techniques. It also discusses term structure models, fixed-income securities with embedded options, and derivatives with fixed-income underlying securities. Instruments to be discussed are forward rate agreements, bond and interest rate futures, interest rate swaps, fixed-income options, mortgage-backed securities, and credit derivatives. The course emphasizes analytical techniques, rather than institutional details.
     

 

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