Aug 11, 2020  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    ECON 525/5201 - Research Workshop (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,  and  

    Description
    Research methodology: collection of data, analysis of information, measurement, and testing hypotheses. Completion of a major research term paper.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 599/5202 - Research Guidance and Thesis (6 cr.)



  
  •  

    ECON 502/5211 - Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Axioms of consumer preferences and rational utility representation. Derivation of Marshallian, Hicksian and Engel demands. Consumer theory under uncertainty. Advanced theory of the firm. Market structure and competition including Counot, Bertrand, and Stackelberg competition for homogeneous and differentiated products. The Envelope Theorem and its applications including Roy, Sheppard, and Hotelling Lemmas. The equilibrium number of firms and business cycle behavior. General equilibrium theory.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 519/5213 - Project Evaluation (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    Analysis of economic criteria (cost benefit analysis) applied in evaluating development projects for economic policy and planning, following a review of the project cycle from inception to impact evaluation.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 520/5215 - Competitive Strategy and Game Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Analysis of competitive strategy and game theory including Nash equilibrium and its refinements. Subgame perfection, Bayesian equilibrium, and information uncertainty. Repeated games. Game theory applications to various economic themes such as in trade, labor, industry, education, stock markets, insurance, and R & D.

    When Offered
    Offered in Spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 530/5217 - Health Economics in Developing Countries (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    This course explores health economics and its unique features in relation to the developing world. Students will learn about the supply and demand for services provided by the health care sector and gain an understanding of the markets for health professionals and health care provider firms specifically extant in the developing world. The course will also explore the roles of insurance, managed care and HMO’s, professional licensure, for-profit and not-for-profit provider firms, and asymmetric information problems in health care markets. Finally, the course will explore issues within the developing world pertaining to regulation, government financing of health care, and health care reform.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 531/5219 - Health Care Financing (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or (   and  )

    Description
    This course explores how health care systems in the developing world raise revenue, the advantages and disadvantages of varying methods of doing so, and how health systems strike a balance between public and private revenue sources. The course also explores how policy makers choose which services to include in publicly-financed health systems, the allocation of resources to those ‘purchasing’ health care, and the degree to which there is a role for competition in this realm. This course will also explore how resources are allocated to health care providers and the incentives associated with different payment methods.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 501/5221 - Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Analysis of the equilibrium and disequilibrium macroeconomic activity of an open, monetized economy with a government sector. Theories of aggregate consumption and investment behavior.

    When Offered
    Offered in Spring
  
  •  

    ECON 505/5231 - Advanced International Trade (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or (   and  ).

    Description
    Analysis of topics in the pure theory of international trade. International aspects of monetary mechanisms, nature and effects of foreign investment, significance of trade theory and monetary movements for developing countries.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 517/5233 - International Finance (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course focuses on the fundamental open macroeconomic issues whether theoretical or empirical. Topics covered include the economics of exchange rates, models of speculative attacks, Mundell-Fleming model, regime credibility, predicting currency and financial crises, international capital flows, and international contagion.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 504/5241 - Financial Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Analysis of financial assets and institutions. The course emphasizes modern asset valuation theory and the role of financial intermediaries, and their regulation, in the financial system. State-preference theory and optimal portfolio decision mean-variance portfolio theory, measuring portfolio risk and return, Capital Asset Pricing model (CAPM), Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT), Option Pricing Theory, the Black-Scholes formula, Asymmetric information and rational expectations, term structure of interest rates.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 528/5242 - Financial Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    .

    Description
    This course aims to advance students’ understanding of modern econometric techniques related to financial issues. This course will cover frontier tools of financial econometrics and empirical finance. The interaction between financial theory and econometric analysis is emphasized. Topics include: non-normality of financial data, volatility clustering and asymmetric volatility, time series models, Vector Autoregressive (VAR) models and continuous time and threshold models. The course is also designed to train students in formulating, estimating and testing models for financial time series using EViews software.
     

  
  •  

    ECON 500/5251 - The Economic Setting for Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    Does not count for credit in the M.A. degree in Economics. Foundation course dealing with macroeconomic variables and issues concerned with the functioning of an economy, in addition to selected microeconomic aspects pertinent to development. Special attention is given to concepts and tools applicable to challenges facing developing countries whose economies often lack the maturity of more developed countries in terms of institutional and policy settings.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 511/5252 - Economic Development in Middle East Countries (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the economic structures, institutions, and policy challenges in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Topics investigated include: the demographic transition, the participation of women in the workforce, regional migration, growth and structural change, poverty, inequality, and regional integration.
     

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 512/5254 - Economic Growth & Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    (  and   ) or (   and    )

    Description
    Growth models and their limitations in developing countries, role of capital, investment, and inflation in economic development, non-economic factors, criteria, and choices of techniques in the process of development.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    ECON 514/5256 - Ethical Issues in Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or   .

    Description
    This course issues of an ethical nature that are related to the development process, decision-making and implementation of development projects. The course will first consider ethical and moral concepts and their philosophical underpinnings and review different schools of thought. Against this background, selected issues specific to development strategies and practices will be dealt with. The course will make use of case studies to illustrate and help analyze issues of concern.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 522/5257 - Economic Strategies for Sustainable Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    (  and   ) or (  and   )

    Description
    This course explores economic strategies achieving balanced and sustainable development from Keynesian, Structuralist, and Neoclassical perspectives. Development policy concerned with short term resource allocation, medium term economic adjustments, and sustainable long term economic growth with technical progress will be studied. Comparative country studies will conclude the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 526/5258 - Development Research Workshop (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: completion of at least three core courses.

    Description
    Review of research process, dealing with problem/hypothesis definition, data collection/analysis, statistical measurement and testing methods particularly relevant to applied development issues (quantitative and qualitative data) and some exposure to applied econometrics. This is followed by individualized guidance of students’ research proposals and projects. Completion of a research-based paper.

  
  •  

    ECON 590/5259 - Practicum (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of 3 core courses at least.

    Description
    It does not count for credit in the MA degree in Economics. A 200-hour assignment with a relevant development-related institution, to be completed over a 4-6 week period, providing exposure and work experience in a development setting. Students are required to prepare a research-based paper drawing on their practicum experience.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 516/5261 - Mathematical Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to economic models: models of the single sector, the trade cycle, growth with employment, medium- and long-term planning, and cyclical growth. Economic regulation, the treatment of technical progress, input-output models.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 508/5271 - Labor Economics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course delivers an advanced treatment of mainstream and alternative approaches to labor economics emphasizing an integration of theoretical and empirical models. Topics to be covered include the life cycle human capital models, search theoretic models, internal markets, reservation wages, migration, inequality, and poverty.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 518/5281 - Econometrics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Review of the traditional methodology of the general linear model. Maximum-likelihood estimation with applications in limited-dependent variable models, switching regression models, ARCH models, etc. Time-series modeling. Dynamic modeling: the general to specific methodology. Non-stationarity and cointegration. Vector autoregression. Exogeneity and structural invariance. Rational expectations. State-space models and the Kalman filter.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    ECON 507/5282 - Quantitative Methods (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course aims to ensure that students understand, master and apply quantitative techniques used in modeling and decision-making related to development. More specifically, the course introduces the basic concepts of quantitative approaches to decision making. It also utilizes wide applications of quantitative techniques to analyze a variety of economic and social problems. Topics include: regression analyses, factor and cluster analysis, panel data and qualitative models.
     

  
  •  

    ECON 509/5291 - An Advanced History of Economic Thought (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore, using bothprimary and secondary sources, the ideas put forth by the great economic thinkers. Class discussion will center on the immediate social impact of these ideas and the factors influencing the course of their evolutionary or revolutionary change over time. Further, this class will encourage students to think critically about the writings of the great economists and explore the possibility that ideological bias is an inexorable feature of science.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    ECON 506/5299 - Advanced Topics in Economics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Consent of instructor

     

    Description
    Guided readings, research, and discussion in special topics in Economics. May be taken for credit more than once if content changes.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.

  
  •  

    EDUC 511/5201 - Foundations of Educational Research (3 cr.)



    Description
    The fundamental aim of this course is to assist MA candidates to develop the knowledge and skills essential to the identification and critical evaluation of educational research relevant to their professional interests and contexts. In the process, learners will become familiar with key issues in qualitative and quantitative research in the field of international and comparative education, and be able to distinguish between good and poor research.

    Notes
    This pre-requisite course should be taken in the first semester of study.

  
  •  

    EDUC 521/5202 - Social Foundations of Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    Using a multidisciplinary approach, the course will examine the underlying issues within contemporary educational policies, practices and theories of education. The course will draw on humanities and social science disciplines to foster the development of MA student’s interpretive, normative and critical perspectives on education both inside and outside of schools. It will also assist students as they explore the relationship of education (formal and informal) to societal, regional and global issues.

    Notes
    This course is a pre-requisite for all other courses and must be taken in the first semester.

  
  •  

    EDUC 531/5203 - Introduction to International & Comparative Education (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course introduces MA students to the origins and development of the field of international and comparative education. The course addresses current educational concerns both on local and international levels, such as purposes of schooling, educational access and opportunity, education accountability and authority, teacher professionalism, and impact of globalization on education. The course also explores the relationship between education and national development, and deepens student’s understanding of methodological approaches to comparative and international education research.

  
  •  

    EDUC 541/5204 - Human Development & Learning Theories for Classroom Teachers (3 cr.)



    Description
    The MA candidates enrolled in the Teacher Education concentration will learn about human growth and development from infancy through adolescence, in order that they will understand the capabilities and needs of their students. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of various aspects of development (including cognitive, linguistic, social/emotional, motor). They will also study current developments in theories of learning, including those derived from neuro-cognitive research, in light of their roles as classroom teachers. Candidates may be exempted from this course if they pass a content-based examination.

  
  •  

    EDUC 551/5205 - Foundations of Instructional Practice for Classroom Teachers (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this course, MA candidates enrolled in the Teacher Education concentration will study major methods of instruction as well as classroom management, lesson planning, meeting the needs of diverse learners, the nature of inquiry learning, and standards-based instruction. Candidates may be exempted from this course if they pass a content-based examination.

  
  •  

    EDUC 532/5211 - Globalization, Development, and Educational Reform in the Arab World (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course surveys policy and reform issues of education in the Arab World, with focus on specific initiatives and how they fit into the context of policy, culture, and economics. The course will examine traditional and non-traditional methods of teaching, school organization, and educational policy-making and will seek to understand how globalized reform initiatives, often instigated through development projects, have impacted those methods. Resulting modes of governance, policy and practice will be analyzed.

  
  •  

    EDUC 533/5212 - Comparative Gender, Adolescent, Youth, and Human Development Policy (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course will explore gender, adolescent youth, and human development policy from a global perspective. The course will examine issues of gender with regard to social and education disparities, as well as women’s rights in comparative and international perspectives. It will also target the changing roles of youth and adolescents in society and the rights and responsibilities of young people. Particular attention will be given to the relationships between educational practices, systems, and policies and their relationship to life-work outcomes.

  
  •  

    EDUC 535/5213 - Educational Evaluation & Assessment (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Contemporary educators are expected to know how to assess and evaluate the knowledge and performance of students, teachers, staff members, and themselves. In today’s reform-minded, information-based society, practitioners must be able to frame problems accurately, collect appropriate data, and analyze the information using acceptable approaches. This course will use a comparative approach, to help MA students learn to analyze ways to: (a) frame a problem using various approaches; (b) identify appropriate data; (c) analyze data; and (d) develop and evaluate alternative solutions to a defined problem. Students will also learn how to utilize current models and methods of assessment in educational contexts.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 536/5214 - Human Rights-based Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course surveys issues and specialized topics in human rights-based education policy, practice, and research. The course focuses on issues of educational availability and access in terms of gender, location, and fees; additionally, it focuses on access to education in conflict areas. The course also focuses on the rights of children in both formal educational environments and within communities. The course will explore these issues through cases and empirical research.

  
  •  

    EDUC 575/5215 - Educational Policy Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    This course explores the policy cycle and contextual factors that influence decisions, by enabling and refining student’s analytic skills. Topics will include the analysis of how policy is created; the ideal and actual forms of the policy cycle; how to create sustainable feedback systems; how to use appropriate analytic approaches to the study of data; and how to use appropriate analytic techniques to analyze policy choices.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 588/5216 - Research-Based Comparative Approaches to Educational Reform (3 cr.)



    Description
    Following an interdisciplinary approach, the course focuses on the reform of educational policy and practices at national, regional, and international levels. The course aims at acquainting students with educational reform trends and approaches including sector reform and school-based reform; developing students’ analytical skills of reform initiatives and outcomes in different countries; developing students’ research skills related to the monitoring and evaluation of reform projects; and promoting the approach of lifelong learning among students as researchers and reflective practitioners.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 534/5217 - Strategic Educational Planning and Development (3 cr.)



    Description
    Education and development are often considered strategically together. This course will examine, from an educational lens, the implications of educational planning in a country’s development. In particular, the course will examine the role of educational policy on the economy, cultural hegemony, and politics. Students will study human capital theory in relationship to various educational strategies. Students will also understand the economic tradeoffs in education as a strategy for development.

  
  •  

    EDUC 585/5219 - Issues in Comparative Education for Policy Planners (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    This course presents MA candidates in the International Education Policy & Planning concentration with major education debates, practices, and challenges which policy planners throughout the world must deal with. The course addresses persistent and emerging themes, such as: planning for nationwide educational reform; financing quality education (public and private); ensuring equitable quality education for all learners; gender and educational equity; lack of infrastructure; adult illiteracy; and the role of multilateral organizations in educational reform in developing countries. 
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 542/5221 - Transformational Leadership (3 cr.)



    Description
    In this course students will investigate leadership theories; however, the focus will be to examine the elements of transformational leadership and explore how transformational leaders create successful school change and innovation. Students will analyze case studies and leadership styles. The course content and activities will encourage and promote students to be educational change agents. Students will study leadership traits, styles and strategies in their own leadership and consider the effectiveness of these characteristics in different circumstances and/or cultural settings. Attention will also be directed to using facilitative power to make second order changes.

  
  •  

    EDUC 544/5222 - School Governance and Management (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    This course examines the allocation of resources to support both student and faculty learning and the effective management of school operations to insure a safe and secure environment, conducive to learning. The course will cover the application of research on effective schools, models of supervision and leadership theory and implementation; it will also investigate the interconnectedness of instructional supervision, educational leadership and school governance and management.

  
  •  

    EDUC 546/5223 - Organizational Theory and Educational Institutions (3 cr.)



    Description
    Educational organizations – schools in particular – are complex environments that are considered to have competing demands. This course seeks to identify the organizational facets of educational institutions that either enhance or obstruct meaningful educational reform. By examining sociological, political, economic, and technical features of educational organizations, this course will expose opportunities for leadership-based change.

  
  •  

    EDUC 573/5224 - Research-based Instructional Leadership (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    The task of improving teaching and learning in the classroom is one that all school administrators face. This course explores the theory and practice eof instructional supervision within a school culture and its critical importance to student achievement. It focuses on the principal as the instructional leader in the school.


     

  
  •  

    EDUC 583/5229 - Issues in Comparative Education for Educational Leaders (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    This course presents MA candidates in the Educational Leadership concentration with major education debates, practices, and challenges which school administrators throughout the world face on a daily basis. The course addresses persistent and emerging themes, including: school administration and financing; quality control of educational program planning and implementation; ensuring provision of equitable education for all learners; developing a learning community at the school, especially through engaging all members in the school’s vision; and involving the wider community in school activities, for mutual benefit. 
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 552/5231 - The Potential of Emerging Technologies as Transformative Learning Tools (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course explores the potential of technology as a transformational tool to facilitate more powerful and era-appropriate ways of learning and teaching. The current educational challenges and changing needs of next generation students will be discussed with reference to technology initiatives and established standards. Students will engage with a variety of emerging technologies, assess their pedagogical potential, and design effective learning opportunities to utilize one or more of these technologies. They will also critically evaluate and synthesize research in this area. Finally, the implications of these technologies in terms of equity and diversity will be discussed. Underlying theoretical frameworks as well as design and implementation strategies are considered throughout the course.

  
  •  

    EDUC 554/5232 - Reading and Writing in the Content Area Classroom (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides primary and secondary teachers with various theoretical constructs to understand learning, reading and writing within distinct academic discourse communities. Attention is focused on instructional strategies for incorporating writing and reading support in various content-based classrooms. Additionally, strategies for encouraging richer content-area learning are provided through the use of varied texts and writing assignments.

  
  •  

    EDUC 556/5233 - Action Research (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course will lead students into action research, a form of self-reflective systematic inquiry by practitioners on their own practice. The process of action research will assist students in assessing needs, documenting the steps of inquiry, analyzing data, and making informed decisions that can lead to desired educational outcomes. The course will equip students with research tools that can be used to contribute to school renewal and instructional improvement. Students will also learn about the four types of action research: collaborative, critical, classroom, and participatory. Finally, the course will critically examine a selected number of case students from various regions.

  
  •  

    EDUC 557/5234 - Reaching Diverse and Underserved Learners (3 cr.)



    Description
    Traditional methods of teaching have been unable to meet the needs of all learners. Students with physical and learning disabilities, students for whom the language of instruction is not their first language, and students who come from impoverished backgrounds all tend to struggle to learn and demonstrate academic proficiency in traditional models of education. This course explores the methods of differentiation and the theoretical foundations of special education, second language instruction, and education of impoverished students. It provides an introduction to each of these areas by providing explicit classroom strategies while providing the underlying theoretical conditions for these strategies.

  
  •  

    EDUC 581/5239 - Issues in Comparative Education for Classroom Teachers (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Completion of Core Courses.

    Description
    This course presents MA candidates in the Pre-K—12 Teacher Education concentration with major education debates, practices, and challenges which teachers throughout the world are faced with on a daily basis. The course addresses persistent and emerging themes, such as: professionalization of teachers and on-going career preparation; integrating technology into instructional practice; formal and informal learning; the role of assessment in instruction; standards-based instruction; and the on-going process of building school-home relationships which can help enhance student learning.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 562/5241 - Pedagogy & Theory of Modern Teaching & Learning in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides students with an overview of trends, theories, principles, and practices in higher education instruction, including online learning and associated instructional models. Beginning with a focus on adult learning theory, as well as learning theories especially associated with traditional university aged students, the course will provide both general and disciplinary specific trends in content delivery and skill development. The course will examine new models of delivery in context both of learning theories and institutional missions. Students will conduct a research project that involves classroom observation, student outcome data analysis, and teacher and learner interviews all with the purpose of providing specific guidance on instructional improvement from both and organizational and a classroom perspective.

     

  
  •  

    EDUC 563/5242 - Theories of Student Development in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course examines patterns of intellectual, identity, and social development among older adolescents and adults, and how these relate to learning and development of desired outcomes of postsecondary education. It is designed to introduce graduate students to major theoretical perspectives, the research based on these theories, and how this body of theory and research can be used to guide the design of educational policies and practices in colleges and universities to promote college student learning and development.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 564/5243 - Policy and administration in Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course provides an overview of both the organizational theories associated with higher education and the trends and practices in policy and administration of higher education. The course begins with the role of governance and how it influences organizational structure, policy and leadership. In addition, the course provides comparative knowledge on the impact of policies and organizational structures on recourse allocation, learning outcomes, student satisfaction, labor market satisfaction and other characteristics.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 561/5249 - Issues in Comparative Education for Higher Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course provides and introduction to the higher education sector in a comparative international context, focusing on policy, institutional replication, global rankings, organizational structures, equity, and finance. Students will apply frameworks of comparative research on higher education, as well as various approaches to analyze reform, policy, practice and outcomes.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 595/5281 - Supervised Fieldwork (3 cr.)



    Description
    This practical course provides participants with opportunities to interact in fieldwork settings, whether as classroom teachers or school-level educational leaders. Students complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork, with the distribution of activities based on the student’s background and interests, and with the agreement of the student’s advisor. Each student must participate in at least three different types of fieldwork activities, which could include peer observation, group-based interaction, observation by a qualified supervisor or mentor, or other parallel activity. Required of MA students who have never taken a documented fieldwork course with extensive classroom and/or school-based experience.
     

    Notes
    This course will be graded Pass-Fail.

  
  •  

    EDUC 580/5282 - Independent Study in International & Comparative Education (3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent study in various areas of International & Comparative Education. To be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings are assigned, assignments are required, and frequent consultations are held.
     

  
  •  

    EDUC 593/5293 - Capstone Project (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    .

    Description
    Students undertake a capstone project related to their concentration in the International & Comparative Education MA program, approved by student’s advisor and two faculty readers. The final capstone project should be submitted in writing an orally defended to the faculty of the Graduate School of Education. The project can be applied, or it can be a work of original research.
     

  
  •  

    EENG 210/2101 - Digital Logic Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      . Concurrent with  

    Description
    The nature of digital logic and numbering systems. Boolean algebra, Karnaugh map, decision-making elements, memory elements, latches, flip-flops, design of combinational and sequential circuits, integrated circuits and logic families, shift registers, counters and combinational circuits, adders, subtracters, multiplication and division circuits, memory types. Exposure to logic design automation software. Introduction to FPGAs and HDL.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall, spring and summer.
  
  •  

    EENG 215/2105 - Circuit Analysis I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Ohm’s law, Kirshoff’s law, Mesh current method, node-voltage method, superposition theorem, reciprocity theorem, Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, maximum power transfer theorem, compensation theorem, T and II networks, transformation equations II to T and T to II. Transients in RC and RL circuits, time constants, mutual inductance and transformers. Time domain behavior of inductance and capacitance, energy storage.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 216/2106 - Circuit Analysis II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and concurrent with   and  

    Description
    Alternating current circuit analysis using complex numbers (phasors), complex impedance and complex admittance. Series resonance and parallel resonance, half power points, sharpness of resonance, the Q-factor, maximum power to an alternating current load, Decibels, power level measurements. The s-plane and poles and zeroes of the transfer function. Forced and natural response of circuits using complex frequency analysis. Three-phase circuits. Two-port networks and the y, z, h and ABCD parameters. Reciprocal networks. Laplace transform techniques.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 218L/2108L - Digital Logic Design Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    The laboratory component will cover experiments in digital design and experiments illustrating material of course   .

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall, spring and summer.
  
  •  

    EENG 219L/2109L - Circuit Analysis Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    Experiments illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 315/3105 - Electronics I: Basic Electronic Devices & Circuits (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Devices and Basic Circuits: Introduction to Electronics, Operational Amplifiers, Diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT’s), Field Effect Transistors (FET’s).

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 316/3106 - Electronics II: Analog Circuits (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      , concurrent with   .

    Description
    Differential and Multistage Amplifiers, Frequency Response, Feedback, Output Stages and Power Amplifiers, Analog Integrated Circuits, Filters and Tuned Amplifiers, Signal Generators and Waveform Shaping Circuits.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 318/3108 - VLSI Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Introduction to fabrication techniques for silicon very large integrated circuits (VLSI), Introduction to MOS transistor. Details of CMOS inverter, transmission gates. Design of Complex CMOS gates; combinational and sequential design techniques in VLSI. CMOS technology and rationale behind various design rules. Design and synthesis using hardware description languages  (HDL) such as Verilog. Use CAD tools to design, layout, check and simulate some basic circuits. Design, layout and simulation of a project.

    Hours
    Two class periods and one three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 319L/3109L - Electronics Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with   .

    Description
    Experiments illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 320/3201 - Linear Systems Analysis (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Basic properties of signals and systems, linearity, stability, step and impulse response,superposition integral, block diagrams, Fourier series and Fourier transform for discrete and continuous time signals, sampling theorem. Experiments are conducted using MATLAB in the computer lab to illustrate the material covered in the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 321/3202 - Automatic Control (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Principles of closed-loop feedback control systems, block diagrams, signal graphs, state variable to solution of free and forced response of linear systems, general feedback theory, transfer functions of components, Eigen-Value problems, criteria for designs, systems study in the domains, Nyquist criterion, Routh criterion, root locus theory and compensation methods. Several experiments are conducted in the Control Lab to illustrate material covered in the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 341/3401 - Electromagnetic Theory I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and  

    Description
    Electric field and potential. Gauss’s law; divergence. Conductors, dielectrics and capacitance. Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations. Electrostatic analogs. Magnetic field and vector potential. Time varying fields; displacement current. Maxwell’s equations in differential form.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 352/3502 - Computer Ogranization and Assembly Language Programming (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Explaining the state of the art computer systems focusing on major components: CPU,I/O, and memory. In-depth discussion of the instructions set architecture of the MIPS microprocessors. This includes different types of assembly instructions doing basic arithmetic, data movement, decision making, and jumping. Discussing different performance matrices of microprocessors and how to measure and analyze performance and evaluate speedups. Going through basic computer arithmetic covering integer and floating point operations. Discussing I/O ports, I/O  devices and controllers, DMA channels, priority interrupts. Also discussing different I/O technologies, such as magnetic disks, flash disks, and optical storage. It also discusses the latest trends in microprocessors design and programming (such as SIMD and MIMD).

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 360/3601 - Power and Machines (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Power system components, Electromagnetic fundamentals and magnetic circuits theory, basic concepts and operating characteristics of transformers, AC machine fundamentals, equivalent circuit and operating characteristics of synchronous machines (generators and motors), theory of operation and basic concepts of induction motors, transmission line parameters, transmission line models and terminal characteristics, power system representation, fault analysis and protection system elements.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 410/4101 - Solid-State Devices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

    Description
    Theory of semiconductor surfaces, field effect transistors, application in static logic design, semiconductor sensors and transducers.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 413/4103 - Testing of Digital Circuits (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Basic concepts behind testing digital circuits. Causes of permanent and temporary failures. Test pattern generation techniques including exhaustive, Pseudo-exhaustive, Path sensitization, Critical path, Random and Pseudo-random Testing. Design for testability methods for testing Integrated Circuits. Techniques for testing Printed circuit boards.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 414/4104 - High Level Digital ASIC Design Using CAD (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Design of digital application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS) using synthesis CAD tools. Topics include the following: design flow, hierarchical design, hardware description languages such as VHDL, synthesis, design verification, IC test, chip-scale synchronous design, field programmable gate arrays, mask programmable gate arrays, CMOS circuits and IC process technology. For the project, students will design and implement a significant digital system using field programmable gate arrays.

    Hours
    Two class periods and one three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 415/4105 - Integrated Circuit Fabrication: Materials and Processes (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Microfabrication techniques for silicon very large integrated circuits (VLSI), unit processes including lithography, native film growth, diffusion, ion implantation, thin film deposition and etching. Metal interconnects. Process integration for CMOS, BiCMOS, ECL and MEMS.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 416/4106 - Advanced ASIC Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course covers advanced topics related  to netlist synthesis, place & route, timing verification, clock tree insertion, power grid distribution, floorplanning of cell-based ASIC design. Other advanced verification techniques topics related to the design automation flow will be covered. Students will design a standard cell library using Verilog for their project.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 420/4301 - Fundamentals of Communications I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       and   , concurrent with   .

    Description
    Review of signal representation and classification, time and frequency domains, Fourier transform; Energy and power spectral density. Basics of analog communication: amplitude, angle, and pulse modulation; modulators and demodulators; frequency division multiplexing. Introduction to digital communication: Review of sampling and quantization; pulse code modulation (PCM), Delta Modulation, Differential PCM, time division multiplexing, line codes; the matched filter. Introduction to Random Processes. Noise in communication systems.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 421/4302 - Fundamentals of Communications II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Fundamentals of Digital Communications. Geometric Representation of Signals; Binary and M-ary Modulation and their Performance Analysis and Spectral Efficiency M-ary baseband transmission. Introduction to Information Theory and Source and Channel Coding; Block and convolutional codes. Introduction to Spread-spectrum communications and discrete multitone (DMT). Several experiments are conducted in the Communication Lab to illustrate the material covered in the course.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 404L/4304L - Photonics and Optical Communication Laboratory (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with   .

    Description
    Experiments in fiber optics illustrating concepts pertaining to fiber dispersion, attenuation measurements, characterization of light sources (LEDs and Laser diodes) and detectors (photodiodes), optical multiplexing and demultiplexing, optical and interferometric sensors.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 432/4306 - Computer Communication Networks (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Practical and theoretical issues related to networking. Topics cover introduction to computer network architecture, OSI model, relevant protocols including data link layer, network layer and transport layer protocols, the ISDN network, the SS7 protocol, high-speed networks including BISDN, and ATM, congestion and control algorithms, quality of service guarantees for throughput and delay. Internet protocol IP, transport layer protocols TCP and UDP, routing and Ethernet, queuing and error correction. Local and wide area networks.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 433/4308 - Telecommunications Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Fundamentals of telecommunication systems: Telephone system fundamentals. Basics of voice over IP networks (VOIP). Cordless telephones, modems and digital subscriber lines (DSL). Satellite Communications and wireless networks.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 434/4310 - Optical Communication Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   , concurrent with   .

    Description
    Operating principles of optical communication systems and fiber optic communication technology. Characteristics of optical fibers, laser diodes, and laser modulation, laser and fiber amplifiers, detection and demodulation, dispersion compensation, and network topologies. System topology, star networks, bus networks, layered architectures, all-optical networks.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 436/4312 - Mobile Communication Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The development of mobile communications systems. Structure of radio communications systems. Techniques in radio communications. Cellular telephony. Mobile radio networks. Packet-switched mobile data communications. Channel capacity in mobile communications. Propagation modeling in mobile communications. Coding and diversity for wireless communications. Wireless communication standards. Wireless LAN’s.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 439L/4314L - Communications Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    Experiments illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 442/4402 - Electromagnetic Waves (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Maxwell’s equations. Plane waves in lossless and lossy media. Skin effect, flow of electromagnetic power. Poyting’s theorem. Reflection and refraction. Guided waves. Boundary value problems, TEM waves, hollow waveguides, cavity resonators, microstrip waveguides, optical fibers. Interaction of field with matter and particles. Antennas and radiation of electromagnetic energy. Elements of radio transmission systems and radar. Several experiments are conducted in the Microwave Lab to illustrate material covered in the course. Boundary Value problems.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 447/4407 - Microwave Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to microwave engineering and wave equation review. Wave propagation and cutoff considerations. Transmission line power and mode limits. Planar and microstrip lines. Obstacles in transmission lines. Impedance matching and tuning. Quarter-wave transformer design. Microstrip transitions. Transmission line and cavity resonators. Sacttering-parameters and applications. Microwave transistor amplifier gain and stability design. Microwave filter design by insertion loss method.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 453/4503 - Microcontroller System Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       ,  ,  and concurrent with   .

    Description
    Microcontroller architecture (Pic, Motorola 68HC11). Interrupts, serial and parallel Input/Output, Timers, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog conversion, Watchdog timers, I/O expansion, Interfacing to keypads and display devices, AC control, Introduction to RISC AND CISC.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 455/4505 - Computer Architecture (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      ,   concurrent with   .

    Description
    The objectives of this course are to introduce the principles of Modern Computer Architecture and design. Topics to be discussed include Instruction Set Architectures, Arithmetic Logic Unit design, CPU data path design, CPU pipelining, memory hierarchy, cache and virtual memory, and introduction to I/O.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 456/4506 - Digital Control Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite:   and   (for EENG students);   and   (for MENG students).

    Description
    Advantages of using PLCs in industrial automation, Basic components of a PLC, Interfacing sensors and actuators to PLCs, Programming of PLCs by ladder logic, Internal markers, Timers, Counters, Conditional jumps and Master Control function, PLC program design, PLC program development for control applications, Advanced Sequential Control Techniques, Data handling instructions, A/D and D/A PLC modules, Basic elements of DCS, Differences between DCS and SCADA, Foundation Field bus and Profibus.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    EENG 458L/4508L - Computer Architecture Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    The laboratory will cover experiments in computer architecture and hardware design and experiments illustrating material of Course   .

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 459L/4509L - Microcontroller System Design Lab (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Concurrent with  

    Description
    Experiments illustrating material of course   .

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 460/4601 - Product Design and Development (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior level standing.

    Description
    The focus of the course is integration of the marketing, design, and manufacturing functions to create a new product. The course is intended to provide you with the following benefits:

    • Competence with a set a tools and methods for product design and development.
    • Confidence in your own abilities to create a new product.
    • Awareness of the role of multiple functions in creating a new product (e.g. marketing, industrial design, engineering, production).
    • Ability to coordinate multiple, interdisciplinary tasks in order to achieve a common objective.
    • Reinforcement of specific knowledge from other courses through practice and reflection in an action-oriented setting.
    • Enhanced team working skills.

     

  
  •  

    EENG 480/4920 - Special Problems in Electronics Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor

    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of electronics engineering may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
  
  •  

    EENG 494/4930 - Selected topics in Electronics Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Description
    Course content will be selected each semester from current developments in the field of electronics engineering.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally
  
  •  

    EENG 497/4950 - Industrial Internship (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: completion of 100 credit hours.

    Description
    Each student is required to be trained for 15 hours in the Mechanical Engineering workshops to study the fundamentals of manufacturing processes (forming, welding and machining). Each student is also required to spend a minimum of eight weeks in industrial training in Egypt or abroad. A complete account of the experience is reported, presented and evaluated.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 490/4980 - Senior Project I (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Description
    A capstone project. Topics are selected by groups of students according to their area of interest and the advisor’s approval. Projects address solutions to open-ended applications using an integrated engineering approach.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 491/4981 - Senior Project II (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    A continuation of the capstone project.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    EENG 510/5210 - Advanced Solid-State Devices (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Graduate standing in engineering and physics. Electromagnetics, vector algebra, differential equations, and MATLAB programming.

    Description
    This course covers crystal structures, band gap theory, ionic equilibrium theory, fundamentals of carrier transport, compound semiconductors III-V. This course will make special emphasis on the properties of various types of junctions (p-n junctions, heterojunctions, metal-semiconductor junctions) leading to various electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), metal oxide-semiconductor FETS (MOSFETs), high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), etc. Short Channel effects and nanoscale phenomena will be emphasized throughout the course and their impact on device modeling in analog and digital circuits.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    EENG 516/5216 - Analog Integrated Circuit Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Design techniques for analog and mixed-signal VLSI circuits. Amplifiers: operational amplifiers, transconductance amplifiers, finite gain amplifiers and current amplifiers. Linear building block: differential amplifiers, current mirrors, references, cascoding and buffering. Performance characterization of linear integrated circuits: offset, noise, sensitivity and stability. Layout considerations, simulation, yield and modeling for high-performance linear integrated circuits. CAD tools: Cadence.

  
  •  

    EENG 517/5217 - Digital Integrated Circuit Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course provides an introduction to the design of digital integrated circuits. Topics covered include: (1) The Diode (DC and Dynamic Behavior), (2) The MOSFET (DC and Dynamic Behavior as well as short channel effects), (3) The CMOS inverter (Static and Dynamic Behavior - Power/Speed Tradeoffs), (4) Combinational Logic Gates (Static CMOS Design, Transistor Sizing, Static vs. Dynamic logic styles, Power/Speed Tradeoffs), Sequential Logic Circuits (Static and Dynamic circuits/flipflops, Power/Speed Tradeoffs) and Low Power Circuit Techniques.

  
  •  

    EENG 518/5218 - Advanced Integrated Circuit Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The objective of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge of designing emerging nanoelectronic devices and using these devices to build future computing systems. After an introduction to CMOS devices and circuits, the course will cover CMOS design and simulation topics. More attention will be paid to the applications of these devices in the implementation of future computers. The memory and logic architectures that take advantage of the properties of the emerging devices will be discussed. Particularly, signal integrity and timing issues, as well as power consumption will be emphasized.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    EENG 553/5223 - Fault-tolerant Computing and Reliability Modeling (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Faults, errors, fault modeling, redundancy techniques, error detecting and correcting codes, self-checking circuits, reliability and availability modeling, performability.

 

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