Jan 18, 2020  
2013-2014 Academic Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Academic Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 

 For the current year, when searching for courses by code, enter the first digit of the course number followed by an asterisk, for example 3* 

 

 
  
  •  

    BIOL 221/2150 - Genetics (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    The course is designed to cover the basic fundamentals of classical and molecular genetics. This includes principal of segregation, DNA structure and genetic variation, chromosome and gene organization, replication, molecular biology of gene expression, and mechanisms of gene regulation. The course also covers genetics of bacteria and their viruses, human genome variation, biotechnology, transgenic organisms, and ethical issues in genetic research. The laboratory consist of exercises to introduce students to classical and contemporary genetic analysis.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 211/2230 - Molecular and Cell Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       and    or co-requisite.

    Description
    The course is designed to provide a detailed understanding of the structure and function of the cell. This includes mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and regulation of transcription and translational machinery. Protein sorting into functional structural proteins will be addressed with emphasis of post-translational protein modifications. Mechanisms of cell-cell signaling and their role in regulating genomic integrity and cell cycle regulation will be covered in details and consequences of abnormalities in these mechanisms will be discussed. Laboratories include the identification of basic cell structures, laboratory techniques in DNA and protein isolation, characterization and computational tools in molecular biology.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 304/2320 - Biophysics (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Principles, concepts and advances in the physical analysis of life processes. Fundamental and advanced physical and physicochemical treatment of kinetic processes underlying the normal function of biological systems will be addressed to include mechanics, hydrodynamics, electricity, optics and nuclear physics.

  
  •  

    BIOL 214/2340 - General Botany (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course will explore several aspects of plant biology with emphasis on structure, function, reproduction, systematics, plant metabolism and development. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of plant breeding, plant tissue culture and genetic transformation and the generation of genetically-modified crops. Detailed morphological, physiological study and greenhouse experimentation will be covered in the lab. Upon completion of this course, students will gain an appreciation for plant diversity, learning how plants are essential for supporting life on our planet and the potential impact of plant biotechnology on our life.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 302/3040 - Environmental Biology for Engineers (2 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

    Description
    This course covers aspects of soil, water, food, and mineral resources management, waste disposal, energy alternatives, population ecology, and environmental ethics with special emphasis on problems encountered by engineers. Laboratory includes field studies of ecosystems, environmental monitoring instrumentation, solar energy techniques, electronic population modeling and techniques used to deal with human consumption of natural resources.

  
  •  

    BIOL 310/3130 - Molecular Evolution and Population Genetics (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course covers a spectrum of evolutionary forces at the molecular level and their impact on allele frequencies in the population. Topics the course will address include the Hardy-Weinberg principles, linkage disequilibrium, genetic drift, neutral theory of molecular evolution, mutation and natural selection, evolution of gene families, lateral gene transfer, basics of molecular phylogenetics, and origin of viruses and origin of the cell. Laboratory sessions will include computational simulations of evolutionary forces in action, population genetics, and maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inferences.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 315/3280 - Biochemistry (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The living cell, structure of biomolecules and their relationship to biological functions; biochemical energetics; metabolism of major cellular components and their relationship to clinical conditions..

    Cross-listed
    Same as .
    Hours
    Two class periods and one three hour lab period.
  
  •  

    BIOL 307/3310 - Microbiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course provides a broad understanding of the microbial world, its application and implications. The fundamentals and principles of bacteriology, virology and mycology are addressed. Cellular and molecular aspects that contribute to selected infectious diseases and the role of the immune system in preventing such diseases are discussed. Additionally we examine the recent advances in pharmaceutical and biotechnology application of microbes.

     

  
  •  

    BIOL 312/3326 - Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The principal objective of this course is to give the student a solid foundation in understanding the anatomy and physiology of the basic vertebrate body from a functional perspective. The course focuses on describing the anatomy of the major organ systems found in vertebrates and explaining how the physiology of these anatomical systems enables vertebrate bodies to function in their environment. The course will survey model organisms to compare variation in anatomy and physiology associated with different behavioral and ecological requirements. The laboratory will consist of computer learning models, physiological and biomedical experiments with living tissue and specimens to investigate the function of various organ systems, and dissection of preserved and fresh vertebrate specimens, to give students in-depth experience with anatomical identification.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    BIOL 313/3340 - Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Invertebrate Zoology is the study of animals without a backbone. These organisms comprise over 99% of all animal species known. Anatomy, development, behavior, systematics, and phylogeny of diverse invertebrate groups are included in the lectures. The class also covers major groups of protozoa. Discussed examples include both representatives of each phylum and highlights of groups of medical, veterinary, or biotechnological importance. Laboratory sessions emphasize morphology and anatomy through dissections, mounted specimens, and prepared slides.

  
  •  

    BIOL 320/3341 - Animal Behavior (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Study of ethology with emphasis on its development, control and function. Laboratory includes observations and descriptions, qualification techniques and experimentation.

  
  •  

    BIOL 301/3360 - Animal Physiology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    A comparative approach to the nutrient procurement, temperature, osmotic and ionic regulation, regulation of fluids, respiratory, circulatory, and digestive systems, reproduction, hormonal and nervous control, behavior, and biological rhythms of animals. Laboratory emphasizes the physiology of invertebrates and vertebrates.

  
  •  

    BIOL 303/3370 - Developmental Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the mechanisms that direct the development of multicellular organisms from a single cell. The course covers the fundamental processes operating during embryonic development including cellular differentiation, development of specialized tissues, morphogenesis, and organogenesis at the cellular and molecular levels. Special attention will be on the understanding of key experiments that contributed to the current knowledge of the basic principles implicated in the development of the organism. Laboratory includes examination of various developmental biology aspects at the molecular, cellular and morphological levels.
     

  
  •  

    BIOL 341/3510 - Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr lab)



    Prerequisites
     ,   ,   .

    Description
    Ecology is the study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and the interactions with the environment that determine those distributions and abundances. The class discusses ecological interactions and mechanisms at organismal, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Chemical, physical, evolutional, and human-driven factors that influence the natural world are explained. A laboratory emphasizing collection, analysis and interpretation of data is included and intended to expose students to a broad array of ecological techniques.

  
  •  

    BIOL 305/3540 - Environmental Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       or instructor’s consent.

    Description
    Examination of degradation and pollution of natural environments. Aspects of soil, water, food, and mineral resources management, waste disposal, energy alternatives, population ecology, and environmental ethics. Laboratory to include field studies of ecosystems, environmental monitoring instrumentation, solar energy techniques, electronic population modeling, techniques used to deal with human consumption of natural resources.

  
  •  

    BIOL 306/3541 - Environmental Biology of the Red Sea (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: students must be good swimmers and consent of the instructor.

    Description
    This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary course for students with an interest in coastal and marine environmental issues. Topics covered include marine biology, ecology, geology, paleontology, climatology, and oceanography. Using the Red Sea as a model, students will receive extensive field experience in evaluating the impact of natural phenomena and human activities on coastal and marine environmental planning, management, and monitoring, as well as in the preparation of environmental impact assessments.

    Notes
    Laboratories and field trips to the Red Sea are essential to the course.

  
  •  

    BIOL 345/3542 - GIS For Biologists (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

    Description
    .Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Biologists is designed to introduce the student to the use and application of computer based mapping and analysis technology to ecological data. The application of GIS technology requires program operation skills, computerization of data and relevant biological information. The course is designed to provide “hands-on” skill development in the use and application of GIS.

  
  •  

    BIOL 399/3910 - Guided Studies in Environmental Biology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Under faculty guidance, students will carry out a project on an environmentally related topic. The students will present their results by submitting a common/individual report or by passing an examination, as determined by the supervisor.

    Cross-listed
    Same as 
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    BIOL 411/4150 - Molecular Biology of the Gene (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
       and    or co-requisite.

    Description
    A comprehensive molecular biology course with emphasis on principles, processes and methodologies leading to the formation of central concepts of molecular genetics. Students are presented to the latest models of describing gene structure, genome organization and regulation of gene and protein expression, in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Current topics such as epigenetics, RNA interference and transgenics are also exposed. Laboratory sessions cover modern techniques in recombinant DNA technology related to gene cloning, protein expression, and omics.

  
  •  

    BIOL 415/4230 - Immunology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The students are introduced to the basic principles of immunology, including the structure and function of the immune system at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ system levels and the processes involved in the host defense against infection. This includes antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, B-and T-cell receptors, antibody formation and immunity, cytotoxic responses, and regulation of the immune response. Students are also introduced to the applied aspects of immunology, which include immunoassay design, flow cytometry and LUMENIX technology. Special topics are also highlighted and discussed including cancer immunology, immunotherapy, autoimmunity, immunomics and vaccination. Laboratories include practical experience with the anatomy and histology of the lymphoid tissues, cell isolation, identification and serological and cellular immune techniques as well as basic tissue culture techniques.

  
  •  

    BIOL 430/4330 - Tumor Biology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    The course provides a broad knowledge on the biological principals underlying tumor and cancer formation. The basic science of tumor at the cellular, molecular and genetic level will be addressed. The course allows students to understand the fundamental mechanisms that underlie eukaryotic cell multiplication, cell senescence and cell death, including the alterations that are involved in the initiation of uncontrolled growth and carcinogenesis. In addition, cell cycle surveillance mechanisms that ensure genomic integrity and the signaling pathways that regulate tumor development and spread will be covered.

  
  •  

    BIOL 420/4490 - Genomics and Bioinformatics (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Bioinformatics is the application of computational methods and tools to, retrieve, and analyze large quantities of sequence datasets. The course covers genomic public databases and resources, sequence alignment, protein structure and function prediction, and analysis of microarray gene expression. Concepts of programming for bioinformatics are introduced. Laboratory session are designed to provide the students with hand-on experience solving practical problems such as characterization of gene interest, identification of differentially expressed genes, prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, and tracking spatial and temporal dynamics of a virus.

  
  •  

    BIOL 440/4540 - Marine Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Examination of the ecology of marine ecosystems. Relationship of physical and chemical processes of marine systems to biological processes in both pelagic and benthic regions. Where possible, examples will be drawn from the Mediterranean and the Red seas.

    Notes
    Includes an extended field trip to marine research institute for “hands-on” experience in marine biological research.

  
  •  

    BIOL 445/4541 - Desert Ecology (3 cr. + 1 cr. lab)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Examination of the ecology of desert ecosystems with particular reference to Middle-Eastern deserts. Emphasis is placed on the strategies employed by desert-living organisms which allow them to survive and prosper under desert conditions. Field trips are an integral part of this course.

  
  •  

    BIOL 410/4910 - Guided Studies in Biology (1-4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Description
    Under the guidance of a faculty member and with the approval of the Chair, the student undertakes readings or research on a specific topic in biology. The student should demonstrate achievements by presenting results, submitting a report, or passing an examination as determined by the supervisor.

  
  •  

    BIOL 408/4930 - Selected Topics in Biology (1-4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

    Description
    Topics in biology chosen according to the special interests of the student and faculty.

    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit more than once if the content changes.
  
  •  

    BIOL 495/4980 - Senior Research Thesis (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Senior standing in biology.

    Description
    Students select a research topic according to their field of interest and the availability of advisers and facilities. A research proposal is submitted to include a literature review on the topic and the design of a laboratory and/or field investigation.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall
    Repeatable
    .
  
  •  

    BIOL 496/4981 - Seminar in Biology (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The senior research thesis project is executed and presented in the form of an oral presentation and a poster session in the annual biology department senior thesis conference. A final report, written similar to an original research manuscript, to include the execution, results and conclusion of the project will be submitted.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    BIOT 501/5201 - Biochemistry (3 cr.)



    Description
    A basic course introducing the student to chemical bonds, structure of biomolecules, the structure and function of cellular components, protein structure and folding, carbohydrates metabolism, fatty acids oxidation, the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, cellular metabolism, energy production, cellular regulatory processes, signal transduction cascades, and photosynthesis.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  .
  
  •  

    BIOT 502/5202 - Cell and Molecular Biology (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course is designed to introduce the student to structure and function of the basic unit of life, the cell. This includes organelle biogenesis, cytoskeleton and cell motility, protein and lipid trafficking, membrane and ion transport, energy flow within the cell, cell cycle, division, and programmed cell death. In addition, to the passage of information from gene to protein will be addressed.

  
  •  

    BIOT 503/5203 - Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course, taught by a team of instructors, covers different areas of biotechnology. This course introduces students to the different aspects of the biotechnology revolution including principles of recombinant DNA technology, protein engineering, directed mutagenesis, manipulation of gene expression, microbial synthesis of biologics, biomass utilization, large scale production of proteins, transgenic animals, and the human genome project. In addition, this course introduces students to bioinformatics and bioengineering.

  
  •  

    BIOT 504/5204 - Experimental Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    This course consists of two class periods and one three-hour lab period. It introduces students to the experimental methods used in investigation and research in biotechnology applications. The laboratory section will provide students with hands-on experimentations in major techniques in molecular biology such as DNA and RNA isolation, protein purification, DNA and protein electrophoresis, nucleic acid hybridization and polymerase chain reaction.

  
  •  

    BIOT 505/5205 - Basics of Bioentrepreneurship (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course covers four modules: business aspects of biotechnology, regulatory issues, patenting biotechnology inventions, and bioethics.

  
  •  

    BIOT 521/5206 - Fundamentals of Bioinformatics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisites: Familiarity with molecular biology, calculus, basic probability and statistics.

    Description
    This course should introduce students to the fundamental theories and practices of bioinformatics. Lectures should focus on the basic knowledge required in this field, including the need for databases, access to genome information, sources of data, and tools for data mining. The course should also cover identification of both lower order and higher order informational patterns in DNA and approaches to linking genome data to information on gene function. Emphasis will be placed on how to use the databases and tools. Students should use the PERL programming language in this course.

  
  •  

    BIOT 531/5207 - Molecular Diagnosis (3 cr.)



    Description
    Topics include diagnosis of genetic disorders, infectious diseases, malignant diseases, and forensic applications such as paternity testing, DNA fingerprinting. Aspects of quality control, quality assurance, regulatory issues, and intellectual properties will be also covered.

  
  •  

    BIOT 541/5208 - Molecular Genetics (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces genetics studies in molecular biotechnology; introduction to Mendalian genetics, eukaryotic gene regulation, genome project and model organisms utilized in research studies, cytogenetics, cellular genomic instability in carcinogenesis and molecular genetic based therapeutic approaches.

  
  •  

    BIOT 533/5209 - Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacogenetics (3 cr.)



    Description
    Principles of pharmacology, drug efficacy, pharmacogenetics of major drug groups, application of pharamcogenomics and proteomics to clinical practice.

  
  •  

    BIOT 543/5210 - Microbial Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Description
    The course introduces current advances in bacteriology, mycology and virology. This covers from medical applications, environmental application of microbes to microbial quality control and assurance in biotechnology products. In addition topics include the use of microbes in recombinant DNA technology, protein production in prokaryotes, fermentation technology, antimicrobial peptides and its applications in medical microbiology.

  
  •  

    BIOT 511/5211 - Bioengineering (3 cr.)



    Description
    The application of the concepts and methods of the physical sciences and mathematics in an engineering approach to problems in the life sciences.

  
  •  

    BIOT 580/5910 - Independent Study In Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of biotechnoloyg may be assigned to individual students or to groups. Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

    Notes
    Students may sign up for up to 3 credits towards fulfilling M.Sc. requirements.

  
  •  

    BIOT 551/5930 - Selected Topics in Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Pre-requisite: consent of instructor, graduate standing.

    Description
    Topics chosen according to special interests of faculty and students.

    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit more than once if content changes.
  
  •  

    BIOT 590/5940 - Graduate Seminar I (2 cr.)



    Description
    Seminars on research topics, research methodology, and thesis writing and presentations given by invited speakers.

  
  •  

    BIOT 591/5941 - Graduate Seminar II (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Seminars on research topics given by invited speakers and on research plans given by students to discuss their thesis topics and the results obtained in their work.

  
  •  

    BIOT 599/5980 - Research Guidance and Thesis (3 cr. + 3 cr.)



    Description
    Consultation on problems related to student thesis.

    Notes
    Must be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.

  
  •  

    BIOT 620/6206 - Computational Genomics and Transcriptomics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    The course is designed to provide graduate students with the essential concepts and skills for processing, analyzing, and visualizing biologcial data generated by modern high-throughput transcriptomic and genomic technologies such as microarray and next-generation sequencing. The open-source statistical platform R and the BioConductor package will be used throughout the course for the practical sessions. The course will focus on how to extract meaningful information from microarray and RNA-Seq data (e.g., differentially expressed genes, alternative splice forms, and polymorphism). Different data visualization methods will be covered from simple summarizing graphs to interaction networks of cellular elements. Practical exercises will use publically published data and simulated data with applications crossing from cancer genomics to environmental genomics. Target audience is biomedical and computational sciences graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    BIOT 601/6930 - Current Topics in Biotechnology (3 cr.)



    Description
     

    This course provides a comprehensive and thorough understanding of recent trends in biotechnology research and development. Frontier areas in biotechnological applications as bioremediation, genetically modified organisms, molecular medicine and nano-biotechnology will be addressed.

  
  •  

    BIOT 602/6931 - Reading and Conference Course (3 cr.)



    Description
    Contemporary biotechnology topics, addressed from current primary literature will be discussed. Dogmas and disputes in biological, medical and/or agricultural sciences will be addressed to generate student discussions.

  
  •  

    BIOT 699/6980 - Research Guidance Dissertation (3 cr.)



    Description
     

    Consultation on problems related to student thesis. To be taken 11 times for credit.

  
  •  

    CASA 411/4101 - Modern Standard Arabic (4 cr.)



    Description
    This course integrates the four language skills to help students develop their ability to produce and comprehend both oral and written discourse at the advanced/advanced high level. The material addresses linguistic needs at this level and provides students with opportunities to further develop their understanding of the various aspects of Egyptian culture.

    When Offered
    Offered in summer.
  
  •  

    CASA 401/4301 - Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (4 cr.)



    Description
    This course further develops students’ skills in Egyptian colloquial Arabic in general while emphasizing the shared features between ECA and MSA. The course concentrates on increasing students’ vocabulary and command of syntax, with a higher level of fluency. The material designed to train students to emulate the speech of educated native speakers in a wide range of social situations.

    When Offered
    Offered in summer.
  
  •  

    CASA 531/5121 - Reading, Writing And Vocabulary Building (5 cr.)



    Description
    This course fosters and further develops the student’s ability to read long, authentic texts on a wide range of topics with minimal dependency on the dictionary. Students are trained to extend their reading strategies and knowledge of different genres and styles. Special emphasis is placed upon vocabulary building and the idiomatic use Arabic. The writing component is integrated whereby students employ and manipulate syntactic and morphological structures studied in the reading component, in addition to various cohesive devices, to produce complex sentences at the paragraph and text level, according to the mores of connected Arabic written discourse.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CASA 521/5151 - Listening And Speaking (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course further develops students’ skill in comprehending large chunks of authentic spoken MSA in different forms of discourse (reports, interviews, debates, etc.). It integrates listening and speaking skills by training students to carry out discussion on various topics of general and personal interest. The course includes a number of live lectures given by specialists in different fields of interests.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CASA 522/5152 - Academic Listening and Speaking (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    This course fosters and further develops the students’ ability to understand the main ideas and most details of connected academic and discourse in a variety of fields. It does so by teaching strategies to sustain both comprehension and delivery of propositionally and linguistically complex extended aural/oral discourse. These include training students to recognize and use cohesive devices signaling the sequence of thought in a given text, enabling them to follow MSA-ECA code-switching and code-mixing patterns, as well as sensitizing them to the socio-cultural nuances embedded in the spoken message.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CASA 551/5201 - Advanced Translation (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course fosters and develops students’ skills in translating written texts of different genres. Attention is given to points of contrast, idiomatic usage, and semantic fields of corresponding vocabulary in English and Arabic. Most work is done on translating from Arabic into English, with special attention given to developing the skills necessary for the preservation of the finer nuances of meaning when rendering a text from one language to another.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CASA 552/5261 - Advanced Media (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course further develops the students’ critical reading skills of linguistically and conceptually complex texts in Arabic printed media. It does so by exposing the students to different text types on a variety of topics, many outside their respective immediate spheres of interest or specialization. It encourages learners to make inferences based on comprehension of the facts presented in a text through sensitizing them to the socio-cultural nuances embedded in the written message. The course also focuses on vocabulary building and trains learners to recognize the special stylistics properties of media language.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CASA 541/5271 - Advanced Writing (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course fosters and develops students’ ability to write, with a high degree of precision and detail, on a variety of academic topics. It also trains them to observe the well-defined rules of Arabic letter-writing. The course teaches the students to write extended research papers, reports and essays, performing various language functions beyond descriptions, comparisons etc., such as argumentation, hypothesizing, refutation etc. Students are trained to appraise samples of authentic written material and model their own written production on them, demonstrating a solid command of grammar (syntax and morphology), vocabulary use, spelling, cohesive devices and general stylistic norms of Arabic discourse.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring
  
  •  

    CASA 501/5301 - Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course further develops students’ skill to communicate in Egyptian colloquial. It concentrates on complex vocabulary and syntax and enables students to communicate with native speakers in a wide range of situations with high level of accuracy and fluency. Special emphasis is placed upon educated Egyptian Arabic as well as appropriateness of speech, and cultural competency.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
  
  •  

    CASA 502/5411 - Advanced Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (3 cr.)



    Description
    This course further develops students’ ability to communicate with native speakers in a wide range of situations with a higher degree of accuracy, fluency, and cultural appropriateness. The course trains students to comprehend and discuss topics of general and personal interest. The materials used reflect the dynamics of Egyptian society and focus on educated Egyptian Arabic.

    When Offered
    Offered in Spring.
  
  •  

    CASA 555/5601 - CASA Students without Borders (2 cr.)



    Description
    This course empowers students to engage in significant learning experiences, develop intercultural competence, work on superior level language proficiency skills, and establish social networks by engaging in the target language community through a project related to their academic and/or professional interests. Each student will design and complete a project related to their academic and/or professional interests that requires their engagment with the target language community. The project will span the fall and spring semesters. Each student will work with a supervising teacher with whom they will write a contract specifying the nature of their project. The project may include volunteer service in a local organization. Projects involving service to the community are highly encouraged.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CASA 553/5991 - Selected Topics in Arabic (3 cr.)



    Description
    Each course addresses a different topic of interest to advanced plus/superior Arabic language students. Topics covered are chosen by the students each semester. Some examples of topics include: Arab literature, politics in the Middle East, and religious studies.

    When Offered
    Offered in spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 215/2251 - Drawing for Construction Engineering and Architecture (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Architectural and structural drawings. Roads and hydraulic works drawings. Construction details. Electro-mechanical drawings for construction.

    Hours
    One three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 280/2311 - Construction Surveying (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Principles of plane surveying; methods of measuring distances, angles and differences in heights (levels); traverse computations; setting out horizontal and vertical curves; earthwork computation; setting out engineering structures and construction projects.

    Hours
    Two class periods and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 325/3010 - Mechanical Engineering in Construction (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to energy transformation systems. Sizing, matching and installation of mechanical, plumbing, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and machining systems.

    Hours
    One class period and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 301/3111 - Structural Analysis (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   or concurrent

    Description
    Analysis of statically determinate structures under static loads, member forces in trusses, shear and moment diagrams, live loads and influence lines, deflections, analysis of statically indeterminate structures by three-moment equation, the method of consistent deformation, slope-deflection, and moment distribution. Approximate analysis of statically indeterminate structures. Matrix force and displacement methods with computer applications.

    Hours
    Three class periods and three-hour tutorial.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring
  
  •  

    CENG 302/3112 - Structural Analysis and Design Principles for Architects (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or concurrent.

    Description
    Classification and analysis of determinate structures including; trusses, beams, frames, arches and cables. Computation of deflections. Analysis of structure using commercial software. Principles of limit states design. Properties of concrete and construction material. Distribution of loads and arrangement of structural elements in reinforced concrete buildings.
     

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring
  
  •  

    CENG 305/3151 - Structural Design for Architects I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Reinforced Concrete Design: Flexural theory of reinforced concrete beams. Design of singly reinforced sections, design and detailing of: beams, solid slabs and short columns. Structural Steel Design: properties of steel, load and resistance factor design of steel structures, structural systems, and computation of loads and load combinations. Design of: Tension of compression members. Behavior of beams and beam columns. Types of Connections.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 306/3152 - Structural Design for Architects II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Structural systems for gravity loads: flat slab, hollow block slabs, paneled beams, stairs, frames. Structural systems for lateral loads: frames, shear wall and combined systems. Foundation systems: introduction to soil types and soil exploration, foundation design consideration, types of foundation systems, design of shallow foundations.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 307/3153 - Structural Design (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Properties of plain and reinforced concrete, behavior of composite sections, ultimate strength and working stress design of structural elements, beams, columns, one-way and two-way solid slabs, detailing of reinforcing steel. Concept of elastic design of steel structures, structural systems for steel buildings and bridges, elastic design and analysis of steel tension members, compression members, beams, columns, and connections.

    Hours
    Three class periods and three-hour tutorials.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring
  
  •  

    CENG 323/3211 - Construction Materials and Quality Control I (4 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Types and properties of construction materials and components. Concepts of quality control, statistical evaluation and corresponding experimental work. Aggregates types, sources and quality. Inorganic cements. Concrete mix design, admixtures and quality control. Asphalt cement, asphalt concrete mix design and quality control. Steel in construction. Masonry materials, timber, insulation materials and coatings.

    Hours
    Three class periods and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 331/3312 - Geology for Engineers (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Minerals and rock types, superficial deposits, interpretation of geologic maps, structural geology, geologic exploration, ground water cycle, geology of Egypt and greater Cairo.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 311/3511 - Fundamentals of Hydraulic Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    (or concurrent).

    Description
    Introduction to water resources projects, pipelines and pipe networks, pumps, open channel flow, hydraulic structures, water flow in soil media, seepage, wells and dewatering systems.

    Hours
    Two class periods and three hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 454/4113 - Structural Mechanics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Review of states of stresses, shear center, principles of fracture mechanics; energy principles with applications to beam deflection and analysis of beams on elastic foundation; principals of structural dynamics; structural stability principles, buckling analysis, and P-Delta effect; introduction to theory of plates and shells.

  
  •  

    CENG 426/4155 - Steel and Concrete Bridges (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Types of bridges. Loads; dead, live, impact, wind and other loading. Basic design and construction of various types of bridges; truss, beam and plate girder, slab, box girder. bearings and expansion details.

  
  •  

    CENG 427/4156 - Prefabricated, Water and Prestressed Concrete Structures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Prefabricated concrete; design methods, tolerance, floor and roof systems, wall panels and construction joints. Concrete water structures; design considerations and parameters, water tightness, construction of circular and rectangular tanks. Prestressed concrete; basic principles, methods and systems of prestressing, partial loss of prestressing, analysis and design for flexural, shear, bond and bearing.

  
  •  

    CENG 428/4157 - Tall Buildings and Large Span Structures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or  

    Description
    Structural systems for modern tall buildings: gravity load systems; transfer floor systems; lateral load systems for resisting wind and earthquake forces; design considerations for tall buildings. Roof systems for large span areas and arenas: shell structures; folded plates; tensile structures and canopies.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CENG 452/4158 - Structural Systems and Advanced Design (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or  

    Description
    Structural design process, structural performance criteria, choice of structural system, design topics for reinforced concrete and steel structures including: rigid frames, ribbed and flat floor systems, torsion, biaxial bending, deflections, composite construction.

  
  •  

    CENG 453/4212 - Construction Materials and Quality Control II (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Various types of advanced concrete, metals, and highway materials.  Examples are concrete admixtures, special concretes, special construction alloys, soil stabilizers, and bituminous materials and high strength low alloy steels. Advanced mechanics of components incorporating innovative materials.  Environmental-friendly use of materials and incorporation of waste materials. Advanced quality control techniques. Laboratory experiments are conducted for demonstration purposes.

  
  •  

    CENG 479/4213 - Assessment, Protection and Repair of Structures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and    

    Description

    Types, mechanisms and analysis of deterioration of concrete and steel structures, approaches and means of damage assessment, assessing structural stability and integrity of existing structures, development of sound strategy for repair and restoration. Protection and repair materials, techniques, design and economic aspects. 

    Cross-listed
    Same as  , but with additional requirements for graduate students.
  
  •  

    CENG 423/4252 - Methods and Equipment for Construction I (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or    or  and concurrent with   or  .

    Description
    Site management. Techniques of building construction; methods, materials, tools and equipment; traditional, mechanized and prefabrication construction systems. Construction detailing. Selection, sizing, matching and operation of construction equipment.

    Hours
    Two class periods and three-hour field trip period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 424/4253 - Methods and Equipment for Construction II (2 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Civil construction; methods, materials, tools and equipment; traditional and modern construction technologies. Evaluation and selection of appropriate construction technology. Sizing, operation and maintenance of construction equipment, design of temporary construction elements such as: concrete formwork, scaffolding systems, cofferdams.

    Cross-listed
    Same as CENG 5246  with special course assignments for graduate students.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 411/4313 - Soil Mechanics (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Index properties and engineering classification, composition and structure of soils; stresses in soil, stress-strain properties of soils; shear strength, and consolidation. Experimental measurements. Lab and field compaction.

    Hours
    Two class periods and three-hour lab period.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 461/4314 - Design and Construction of Foundations and Retaining Structures (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Earth pressure theories; bases for design of retaining structures; fundamental problems of slope stability; types of foundations systems and design criteria; design of shallow foundations and deep foundations; construction methods; effects of construction of nearby structures.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 462/4315 - Applications in Geotechnical Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
       or concurrent.

    Description
    Geotechnical analysis and design concepts applied to engineering projects: stability of natural and man-made soil and rock slopes, reinforced earth, deep soil stabilization, cofferdams, mat foundation, deep foundation under various loading conditions.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CENG 431/4351 - Transportation Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Introduction to transportation planning and engineering; transportation planning tools, concepts of geometric and structural design and construction of highways, and concepts of geometric design of railways.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 481/4352 - Highway Facilities (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Analysis of factors in developing highway transportation facilities, traffic estimates and assignment, problems of highway geometric and design standards, planning and location principles, intersection design factors, structural design of pavement and highway maintenance.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CENG 441/4410 - Introduction to Construction Management and Cost Estimating (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   or   .

    Description
    Introduction to construction management: participants involved types of construction project life cycle. Estimating techniques and procedures: approximate estimating, quantity surveying, detailed estimating procedure, costing of labor, material, equipment, overhead costs, cash flow analysis, financing costs, cost recording and cost accounts, Quality Management, and Safety Management; basics of company’s organization and HR management.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 442/4420 - Construction Project Specifications, Bids, and Contracts (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Participants in a construction contract. Contract definition. Types of contracts; formation principles of a contract, performance or breach of contractual obligations. Analysis and comparison of the different kinds of construction contracts. Bidding logistics. Legal organizational structures. Different types and uses of specifications. Different forms of contracts utilized in construction.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 444/4430 - Risk Management and Bidding Strategies (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and  

    Description
    Introduction to Risk and Uncertainty. Process of Risk Management: Risk Identification, Risk Analysis (Qualitative and Quantitative), Risk Response Planning, Risk Monitoring and Control, Tools and Techniques: Decision Tree, modeling, optimization, linear programming, network optimization, and inventory models. Monte Carlo Simulation and Application. Accounting for Project Risks. Introduction to Risk Analysis packages (Crystal Ball, PERT Master). Analyzing the Bidding Behavior of Key Competitors and Estimating Optimum Markup.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 446/4440 - Techniques of Planning, Scheduling and Control (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      .

    Description
    Project definition and work breakdown structure, deterministic and probabilistic scheduling and control models and techniques. Resource allocation and levelling, optimal schedules, documentation and reporting, time and cost control, progress monitoring and evaluation. Computer applications.

    Cross-listed
    Same as CENG 5246  with special course assignments for graduate students.
    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 447/4450 - Design, Modeling and Simulation of Construction Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Building Information Modeling, Computer modeling of construction processes, 4D Simulation of construction operations, Productivity modeling, measuring and forecasting, Sequencing and coordination of construction systems, Post-Optimality Analysis of Integer and Linear Programming Models in construction, discrete event simulation of construction processes.

    Hours
    Two one-hour class periods and three-hour lab period.
  
  •  

    CENG 448/4460 - Financial Management and Accounting for Construction (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Basic accounting terminology, accounting cycle and process, financial statements and analysis, unique aspects of accounting for the construction industry methods of revenue recognition for construction, percentage of completion computations, unbalanced items in construction: costs in excess and billings in excess.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 449/4470 - Contract Administration (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      or concurrent.

    Description
    Construction project parties’ responsibilities pursuant to Civil Code and the Law of Tenders and Auctions (No. 89/1998), tendering procedures, contract negotiation and drafting, document control, international form of contracts (FIDIC), management of the variation process, Claims preparation and evaluation, disputes resolution methods.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CENG 471/4551 - Environmental and Sanitary Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Water quality.  Material balance relationships and water pollution control.  Water demand. Drinking water: collection, treatment, distribution and quality assurance.  Domestic and industrial wastewater collection, treatment and disposal.  Environmental Impact Assessment.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 472/4552 - Design of Water Resources Systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
     

    Description
    Introduction to water resources engineering.  Design of irrigation systems and canals.  Hydraulic structures: types, functions, hydraulic design, environmental impact.  Urban and rural drainage systems associated with public infrastructure projects: types, design considerations, and hydraulic design.

    When Offered
    Offered occasionally.
  
  •  

    CENG 473/4553 - Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
        concurrent.

    Description
    Theory and design of unit operations and processes in environmental engineering, emphasizing water and wastewater treatment; namely: physical, chemical and biological unit processes, sludge handling processes.

    Cross-listed
    Same as  , but with additional requirements for graduate students.
  
  •  

    CENG 474/4554 - Computer-aided design and construction of environmental and sanitary systems (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
      and   .

    Description
    Sanitary, storm water and combined sewerage systems: selection, elements, layout, computer-assisted hydraulic modeling and design. Water supply and distribution systems: hydraulic modeling and design. Pipeline asset management, GIS application in pipeline management and Life Cycle Cost Analysis. Pipeline rehabilitation and repair methods. Planning and construction considerations.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 475/4555 - Solid and Hazardous Wastes Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Pre-requisites:  Senior standing.  

    Description
    Solid wastes – Nature, generation and collection.  Local and regional management strategies including recycling and recovery of useful products, landfilling, and incineration.  .  Hazardous wastes – Nature, generation and collection.  Risk assessment.  Management strategies including source reduction, treatment, recovery, landfilling, and incineration. 

    Cross-listed
    Same as , but with additional requirements for graduate students.

    Same as

      .

  
  •  

    CENG 494/4911 - Selected Topics in Construction Engineering (3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Description
    Specialized topics in construction engineering will be selected and presented.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
  
  •  

    CENG 480/4921 - Special Problems in Construction Engineering (1-3 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department chair on the basis of a well-defined proposal.

    Description
    Independent study in various problem areas of construction may be assigned to individual students or groups.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall and spring.
    Repeatable
    May be repeated for credit if content changes.
    Notes
    Readings assigned and frequent consultations held.

  
  •  

    CENG 497/4951 - Practical Training (1 cr.)



    Prerequisites
    Prerequisite: completion of 96 credit hours.

    Description
    Each student is required to spend a minimum of eight weeks in industrial training in Egypt or abroad. A complete account of the experience is reported, presented and evaluated. Professional ethics: theories and analysis of ethical case studies.

    When Offered
    Offered in fall.
 

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